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Here is my basic example:

class Foo {

    public $toy = "car";

    public function run() {
        $this->toy = "train";
        $bar = new Bar();
        $bar->run();
    }   
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    public function run() {
        echo $this->toy;
    }
}

$foo = new Foo();
$foo->run();

For some reason it will always echo car not train. What is the reason for this?

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because you are creating a new Bar instance inside Foo::run. Changes you make to the Foo instance have no effect on the Bar instance. They are two different instances.
You can also see it this way: Whenever you instantiate an object from the child class, a new instance of the parent class will be created.

You can make the property static though, then it will be shared between all instances:

class Foo {

    public static $toy = "car";

    public function run() {
        self::$toy = "train";
        $bar = new Bar();
        $bar->run();
    }   
}

class Bar extends Foo {
    public function run() {
        echo self::$toy;
    }
}
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I added a point here for a better, more logic explenation... –  Kennethvr Nov 19 '10 at 10:07
    
is there any way to do this without making it static? –  fire Nov 19 '10 at 11:20
    
@fire: Not if you want to have two different instances share a value. You could do it via third object that is referenced by both instances but whether that is convenient or not depends on the actual context. –  Felix Kling Nov 19 '10 at 12:20
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Foo run creates an object Bar, which has toy, initialized with car. So, the result is car, as expected.

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What you do is "delegation": You create a new instance and call this instead of the parents method. What you are looking for is

parent::run();

This will call the parents method.

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