Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a script I am requiring from a node.js script, which I want to keep javascript engine independent.

So, for example, I want to do:

exports.x = y;

only if it's running under node.js. how can I perform this test?

Edit: When posting this question, I didn't know the node.js modules feature is based on commonjs.

For the specific example I gave a more accurate question would've been:

How can a script tell whether it has been required as a commonjs module?

share|improve this question
3  
I've no idea why you are trying to do this, but as a rule of thumb you should be using feature detection rather then engine detection. quirksmode.org/js/support.html –  Quentin Nov 19 '10 at 11:44
    
This is actually a request on how to implement feature detection, but the question poorly describes itself. –  monokrome Jan 23 '13 at 21:30

13 Answers 13

up vote 34 down vote accepted

This is how the Underscore.js library does it (by looking for CommonJS support):

Edit: to your updated question:

(function () {

    // Establish the root object, `window` in the browser, or `global` on the server.
    var root = this; 

    // Create a refeence to this
    var _ = new Object();

    var isNode = false;

    // Export the Underscore object for **CommonJS**, with backwards-compatibility
    // for the old `require()` API. If we're not in CommonJS, add `_` to the
    // global object.
    if (typeof module !== 'undefined' && module.exports) {
            module.exports = _;
            root._ = _;
            isNode = true;
    } else {
            root._ = _;
    }
})();

Example here retains the Module pattern.

share|improve this answer
3  
This detects CommonJS support, which browsers may support. –  mikemaccana Dec 24 '12 at 14:05
2  
There is a problem here and nailer "nailed it". I'm trying CommonJS in the browser, and the module loader I'm using defines module.exports, so this solution would incorrectly tell me I'm in node. –  Mark Melville Dec 31 '12 at 23:02
    
@MarkMelville arguably, this is exactly what the OP is asking so therefore not a problem. –  Ross Jan 1 '13 at 17:37
7  
Poor wording on my part. I mean there is a problem with this solution. The OP may have accepted it, but I do not. –  Mark Melville Jan 3 '13 at 23:40

Well there's no reliable way to detect running in Node.js since every website could easily declare the same variables, yet, since there's no window object in Node.js by default you can go the other way around and check whether you're running inside a Browser.

This is what I use for libs that should work both in a Browser and under Node.js:

if (typeof window === 'undefined') {
    exports.foo = {};

} else {
    window.foo = {};
}

It might still explode in case that window is defined in Node.js but there's no good reason for someone do this, since you would explicitly need to leave out var or set the property on the global object.

EDIT

For detecting whether your script has been required as a CommonJS module, that's again not easy. Only thing commonJS specifies is that A: The modules will be included via a call to the function require and B: The modules exports things via properties on the exports object. Now how that is implement is left to the underlying system. Node.js wraps the modules content in an anonymous funciton.

function (exports, require, module, __filename, __dirname) { 

See: https://github.com/ry/node/blob/master/src/node.js#L325

But don't go there by trying to detect that via some crazy arguments.callee.toString() stuff, instead just use my example code above which checks for the Browser, Node.js is a way cleaner environment so it's unlikely that window will be declared there.

share|improve this answer
1  
About "Node.js is a way cleaner environment so it's unlikely that window will be declared there.": well, I just came here looking for a way to find out whether my script was running in a browser emulated by node.js + JSDOM or in a plain browser... The reason is that I have an infinite loop using setTimeout to check the URL location, which is fine in a browser, but keeps the node.js script running forever... So there might be a window in a node.js script after all :) –  Eric Bréchemier Feb 1 '11 at 18:18
    
@Eric I highly doubt it will be there in the global scope, so unless you import something as window in the first line of your module you should not have any problems. You could also run an anonymous function and check the [[Class]] of this inside it (works only in non-strict mode) See "Class" under: bonsaiden.github.com/JavaScript-Garden/#typeof –  Ivo Wetzel Feb 1 '11 at 18:28
1  
My issue differs slightly from the OP's: I am not requiring the script, it is loaded by JSDOM with the emulated window as global context... It is still run by node.js + V8, just in a different context than usual modules. –  Eric Bréchemier Feb 1 '11 at 20:01
    
@Eric Hm, you should still be able to employ the this trick though, since JSDOM has no way to alter the way JS works in that regard. –  Ivo Wetzel Feb 1 '11 at 20:54
1  
Probably... I went another direction: 1) detect support for onhashchange ("onhashchange" in window) to avoid creating the infinite loop 2) simulate support by setting the onhashchange property on emulated window in main node.js script. –  Eric Bréchemier Feb 1 '11 at 22:00

Most of the proposed solutions can actually be faked. A robust way is to check the internal Class property of the global object using the Object.prototype.toString. The internal class can't be faked in JavaScript:

var isNode = 
    typeof global !== "undefined" && 
    {}.toString.call(global) == '[object global]';
share|improve this answer
    
This will come back true under browserify. –  Jackson Gariety Jan 2 at 6:28
1  
Did you test that? I can't see how browserify can change the internal class of an object. This would require changing code in the JavaScript VM or overwriting Object.prototype.toString which is really bad practice. –  Fabian Jakobs Jan 2 at 9:54
    
I tested it. Here's what browserify does: var global=typeof self !== "undefined" ? self : typeof window !== "undefined" ? window : {}; –  Vanuan Jan 30 at 15:33
    
You see, in Chrome, ({}.toString.call(window)) is equal "[object global]". –  Vanuan Jan 30 at 15:43
    
It's strange, because window.toString() produces "[object Window]" –  Vanuan Jan 30 at 15:45

The problem with trying to figure out what environment your code is running in is that any object can be modified and declared making it close to impossible to figure out which objects are native to the environment, and which have been modified by the program.

However, there are a few tricks we can use to figure out for sure what environment you are in.

Lets start out with the generally accepted solution that's used in the underscore library:

typeof module !== 'undefined' && module.exports

This technique is actually perfectly fine for the server side, as when the require function is called, it resets the this object to an empty object, and redefines module for you again, meaning you don't have to worry about any outside tampering. As long as your code is loaded in with require, you are safe.

However, this falls apart on the browser, as anyone can easily define module to make it seem like it's the object you are looking for. On one hand this might be the behavior you want, but it also dictates what variables the library user can use in the global scope. Maybe someone wants to use a variable with the name module that has exports inside of it for another use. It's unlikely, but who are we to judge what variables someone else can use, just because another environment uses that variable name?

The trick however, is that if we are assuming that your script is being loaded in the global scope (which it will be if it's loaded via a script tag) a variable cannot be reserved in an outer closure, because the browser does not allow that. Now remember in node, the this object is an empty object, yet, the module variable is still available. That is because it's declared in an outer closure. So we can then fix underscore's check by adding an extra check:

this.module !== module

With this, if someone declares module in the global scope in the browser, it will be placed in the this object, which will cause the test to fail, because this.module, will be the same object as module. On node, this.module does not exist, and module exists within an outer closure, so the test will succeed, as they are not equivalent.

Thus, the final test is:

typeof module !== 'undefined' && this.module !== module

Note: While this now allows the module variable to be used freely in the global scope, it is still possible to bypass this on the browser by creating a new closure and declaring module within that, then loading the script within that closure. At that point the user is fully replicating the node environment and hopefully knows what they are doing and is trying to do a node style require. If the code is called in a script tag, it will still be safe from any new outer closures.

share|improve this answer

Here's my variation on what's above:

(function(publish) {
    "use strict";

    function House(no) {
        this.no = no;
    };

    House.prototype.toString = function() {
        return "House #"+this.no;
    };

    publish(House);

})((typeof module == 'undefined' || (typeof window != 'undefined' && this == window))
    ? function(a) {this["House"] = a;}
    : function(a) {module.exports = a;});

To use it, you modify the "House" on the second last line to be whatever you want the name of the module to be in the browser and publish whatever you want the value of the module to be (usually a constructor or an object literal).

In browsers the global object is window, and it has a reference to itself (there's a window.window which is == window). It seems to me that this is unlikely to occur unless you're in a browser or in an environment that wants you to believe you're in a browser. In all other cases, if there is a global 'module' variable declared, it uses that otherwise it uses the global object.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for: typeof window != 'undefined' && this === window –  Cédric Belin May 15 at 4:40

I'm using process to check for node.js like so

if (typeof(process) !== 'undefined' && process.version === 'v0.9.9') {
  console.log('You are running Node.js');
} else {
  // check for browser
}

or

if (typeof(process) !== 'undefined' && process.title === 'node') {
  console.log('You are running Node.js');
} else {
  // check for browser
}

Documented here

share|improve this answer
    
process.title can be changed –  Ben Barkay Apr 18 '13 at 23:35
    
Then check for the title you changed it to. Or use process.version –  Chris Apr 19 '13 at 7:12
    
If you're writing for a library (like you should), you will not be able to expect what the title should be –  Ben Barkay Apr 19 '13 at 15:57

How can a script tell whether it has been required as a commonjs module?

Related: to check whether it has been required as a module vs run directly in node, you can check require.main !== module. http://nodejs.org/docs/latest/api/modules.html#accessing_the_main_module

share|improve this answer
    
This was useful to me, thanks. –  kybernetikos Mar 30 '12 at 16:29

The following should work and can't be intentionally replicated in the browser:

if(typeof process === 'object' && process + '' === '[object process]'){
    // is node
}
else{
    // not node
}

Bam.

share|improve this answer

What about using the process object and checking execPath for node?

process.execPath

This is the absolute pathname of the executable that started the process.

Example:

/usr/local/bin/node

share|improve this answer

Edit: Regarding your updated question: "How can a script tell whether it has been required as a commonjs module?" I don't think it can. You can check whether exports is an object (if (typeof exports === "object")), since the spec requires that it be provided to modules, but all that tells you is that ... exports is an object. :-)


Original answer:

I'm sure there's some NodeJS-specific symbol (EventEmitter, perhaps no, you have to use require to get the events module; see below) that you could check for, but as David said, ideally you're better off detecting the feature (rather than environment) if it makes any sense to do so.

Update: Perhaps something like:

if (typeof require === "function"
    && typeof Buffer === "function"
    && typeof Buffer.byteLength === "function"
    && typeof Buffer.prototype !== "undefined"
    && typeof Buffer.prototype.write === "function") {

But that just tells you that you're in an environment with require and something very, very much like NodeJS's Buffer. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
I can still break that by setting up all that stuff in a Website... that's just overkill ;) Checking for being in a Browser is easier since the Node environment is cleaner. –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 19 '10 at 12:10
    
@Ivo: Yes, see my last sentence. I can just as easily break your check by defining a window variable within a NodeJS application. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Nov 19 '10 at 12:15
    
@T.J Crowder Still Node.js is a cleaner environment it's stupid to define a window global there, and I haven't encountered something like that yet. Also you have full control over your Node.js code, but not over the users Browser. –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 19 '10 at 12:19
    
@Ivo: I wouldn't be at all surprised if someone defined window in a NodeJS module, so they could include code that relied on window being the global object and didn't want to modify that code. I wouldn't do it, you wouldn't, but I bet someone has. :-) Or they've just used window to mean something else entirely. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 19 '10 at 12:21
1  
@Ivo: yuiblog.com/blog/2010/04/09/… is one reason why the window object may be defined in node.js –  slebetman Nov 19 '10 at 14:35

Very old post, but i just solved it by wrapping the require statements in a try - catch

    try {

           var fs = require('fs')

} catch(e) {
       alert('you are not in node !!!')
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you explain why this works? –  suspectus Jul 24 at 20:57
    
Y'know.... not only node uses require()... –  Adam Robertson Aug 7 at 19:03

This is a pretty safe and straight-forward way of assuring compatibility between server-side and client-side javascript, that will also work with browserify, RequireJS or CommonJS included client-side:

(function(){

  // `this` now refers to `global` if we're in NodeJS
  // or `window` if we're in the browser.

}).call(function(){
  return (typeof module !== "undefined" &&
    module.exports &&
    typeof window === 'undefined')
    global : window;
})
share|improve this answer

Take the source of node.js and change it to define a variable like runningOnNodeJS. Check for that variable in your code.

If you can't have your own private version of node.js, open a feature request in the project. Ask that they define a variable which gives you the version of node.js that you're running in. Then check for that variable.

share|improve this answer
    
That again doesn't solve his (basically unsolvable) problem, I can again just create such a variable in the Browser. Better way would be to prevent scripts from creating a window global, guess I gonna file a feature request on that one. –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 19 '10 at 12:52
    
There you go: github.com/ry/node/issues/issue/437 –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 19 '10 at 13:04
    
@Ivo: That's a bad idea that would break code that uses jsdom (github.com/tmpvar/jsdom) to do server side dom manipulation using familiar libraries like YUI and jQuery. And there are code currently in production that does this. –  slebetman Nov 19 '10 at 14:39
    
@slebetman No it will not break jsdom. I'm speaking of global, like in no var statement global, the example code there uses the var statement, people who just leak it into the global namespace, well they don't get the concept of self-contained modules then –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 19 '10 at 15:03
    
@Ivo that's kind of violent, it's like saying we should take the ability to eat cakes because people get fat overeating them. You must clutter the global namespace to achieve a library that will work inter-module. Or you could wrap it all up in a single module, but then what's the point? –  Ben Barkay Apr 10 '13 at 8:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.