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template<typename T> struct A {
    auto func() -> decltype(T::func()) {
        return T::func();
    }
};
class B : public A<B> {
    void func() {
    }
};

Seems pretty simple to me. But MSVC fails to compile.

visual studio 2010\projects\temp\temp\main.cpp(4): error C2039: 'func' : is not a member of 'B'
visual studio 2010\projects\temp\temp\main.cpp(8) : see declaration of 'B'
visual studio 2010\projects\temp\temp\main.cpp(8) : see reference to class template instantiation 'A<T>' being compiled
          with
          [
              T=B
          ]
visual studio 2010\projects\temp\temp\main.cpp(4): error C3861: 'func': identifier not found

Even though the compiler will happily accept calling the function. The below sample compiles fine.

template<typename T> struct A {
    void func() {
        return T::func();
    }
};
class B : public A<B> {
    void func() {
    }
};

I've got the same issue trying to use any types from the template argument.

template<typename T> struct A {
    typedef typename T::something something;
};
class B : public A<B> {
    typedef char something;
};

visual studio 2010\projects\temp\temp\main.cpp(4): error C2039: 'something' : is not a member of 'B'

Whereas class B clearly defines a type called "something". The compiler is perfectly happy to call functions on an object of type T, T& or T*, but I can't seem to access any types from T.

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The compiler will not happily instantiate A<B>::func, we covered this in your previous question. –  Fred Nurk Nov 20 '10 at 21:04
    
You can think of this as a race condition: the instantiation of A<B> depends on the definition of B because A<B>::func's return type depends on B::func's return type, yet defining B (and thus declaring B::func) depends on A<B> as a base class. –  Fred Nurk Nov 20 '10 at 21:14
    
@Fred: You're right about my CRTP fail. But if you want to have the answer accepted, you'll have to post it as one, instead of a comment. –  Puppy Nov 21 '10 at 0:03
    
I didn't think that was worth an answer, and it needs to be double-checked with 0x. –  Fred Nurk Nov 21 '10 at 2:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You are trying to use T::func before it was declared. That's why the compiler shouts at you. Notice that when you derive from a class, the class is generated if it comes from a class template. And the implicit generation of the class (which is called implicit instantiation) necessiates the generation of declarations for all its members (so the compiler knows the sizeof value of the class, and can perform lookup into it).

So it also instantiates the declaration auto func() -> decltype(T::func()) and surely fails here.

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There seem to be several issues with your code, one of which looks like a VS10 bug.

  1. You're calling T::func() from A without casting A to T, this is needed as part of CRTP since A doesn't derive from T. -- FixL return static_cast<T*>(this)->func();
  2. What you're passing to decltype looks like a static function invocation while func is in fact an instance function. Since decltype doesn't actually run the function you should do something like this decltype(static_cast<T*>(nullptr)->func())
  3. func is private in B and can't be called from A -- Fix: change A to be a struct
  4. This looks like a bug in VS10, even after all these fixes I get an error that you're trying to use an undefined class B in the decltype.

As a workaround can you refactor func out into a base class? (now we need two template parameters, one for casting to and one for decltype thus creating a new idiom CRTPEX)

struct Base { 
    void func() { }
};

template<typename T, typename U> struct A {
    auto func() -> decltype(static_cast<T*>(nullptr)->func()) {
        return static_cast<U*>(this)->func();
    }
};


struct B : public A<Base, B>, public Base {
};

I see that g++ also chokes on this decltype can anyone confirm that this is a defect? If so I will open a bug for Microsoft. It is my understanding that the following code is valid but neither g++ nor VC10 compile it.

template<typename T> struct A {
    auto func() -> decltype(static_cast<T*>(nullptr)->func()) {
        return static_cast<T*>(this)->func();
    }
};

struct B : public A<B> {
    void func() {}
};
share|improve this answer
    
If you have found a bug in Visual C++, please consider filing a bug report at connect.microsoft.com (if you do file a bug, post a link here so people know it's been reported). –  James McNellis Nov 21 '10 at 9:25
    
@James, I was in the middle of submitting a bug but found that the behaviour is the same in g++ (see my edit to the question). –  Motti Nov 21 '10 at 9:36
    
No, you can't. If you try that, you get an internal MSBuild error. –  Puppy Nov 21 '10 at 10:04
    
@DeadMG, "no you can't" what? Can you be more specific? –  Motti Nov 21 '10 at 10:07
    
@Motti: Sorry- mistake. You can't do the Base thing, because you can't cast an A<Base> to a Base. –  Puppy Nov 21 '10 at 10:11

First, I think that the close-to-proper code is:

template<typename T> struct A {
    auto func()
     -> decltype(static_cast<T*>(this)->func()) 
    {
        return static_cast<T*>(this)->func();
    }
};
class B : public A<B> {
    void func(){
    }
};

As Motti pointed out. However that still fails, and I think for the reason that the return type of the base has to be known when B is declated to inherit from A<B>, but since B is not defined yet, it becomes a chicken and egg problem.

However, it may be finally be possible in C++1y by using simply auto (without decltype), I tried with gcc-4.8.2

template<typename T> struct A {
    auto func()
    //c++1y// -> decltype(static_cast<T*>(this)->func()) 
    {
        return static_cast<T*>(this)->func();
    }
};
class B : public A<B> {
    void func(){
    }
};

This compiles (c++ -std=c++1y) and runs:

int main(){
  B b; b.func();
}

Two disclaimers: I don't know why this works. I don't know how standard it is.

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