Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know that is a weird question, and probably there is not an answer. I'm trying to execute the rest of the try block after an exception was caught and the except block was executed.

Example:

[...]
try:
 do.this()
 do.that()
 [...]
except:
 foo.bar()
[...]

do.this() raise an exception managed by foo.bar(), then I would like to execute the code from do.that(). I know that there is not a GOTO statement, but maybe some kind of hack or workaround!

Thanks!

share|improve this question
9  
This indicates that something is wrong with your design. If do.that can operate even when do.this has raised an exception, then they should not be in the same try-except-block. You would have to provide information on what the functions are actually doing so we can suggest a solution. –  Björn Pollex Nov 19 '10 at 14:31

8 Answers 8

A try... except... block catches one exception. That's what it's for. It executes the code inside the try, and if an exception is raised, handles it in the except. You can't raise multiple exceptions inside the try.

This is deliberate: the point of the construction is that you need explicitly to handle the exceptions that occur. Returning to the end of the try violates this, because then the except statement handles more than one thing.

You should do:

try:
    do.this()
except FailError:
    clean.up()

try:
    do.that()
except FailError:
    clean.up()

so that any exception you raise is handled explicitly.

share|improve this answer

Use a finally block? Am I missing something?

   [...] 
    try: 
     do.this() 
    except: 
     foo.bar() 
    [...] 
    finally:
     do.that()
     [...] 
share|improve this answer
    
I wasn't clear in my question. Actually the exception can be raised from this() or that() or wherever, it doesn't care, but the the point is to "return" in some way to the try block. "Return" or execute in some manner the code in the try block after the exception –  Niko P Nov 19 '10 at 14:48

If you always need to execute foo.bar() why not just move it after the try/except block? Or maybe even to a finally: block.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't need to execute always foo.bar(). That was just an example. What I'm trying to do is to return to the try: block after the execution of an except: block –  Niko P Nov 19 '10 at 14:32
1  
@Niko P, you cannot return to the try block if an exception is raised. But you can restructure your code so that you don't need to. –  Klaus Byskov Pedersen Nov 19 '10 at 14:34
    
I know that I cannot return to the try block. But supposing that I am able to fix do.this() (or any other operation within that try block) at runtime, how can I resume the execution? Only splitting every single call in a try/execute block? –  Niko P Nov 19 '10 at 14:43

One possibility is to write a code in such a way that you can re-execute it all when the error condition has been solved, e.g.:

while 1:
   try:
      complex_operation()
   except X:
      solve_problem()
      continue
   break
share|improve this answer
    
This way re-run all the try: block. I would like to re-start the execution from the next instruction of the failing one. –  Niko P Nov 19 '10 at 14:36
    
That's why I said "write the code in such a way that you can re-execute it all", e.g. code that doesn't need to reacquire resources, things like that. Well, was just a thought. –  UncleZeiv Nov 19 '10 at 18:51

You need two try blocks, one for each statement in your current try block.

share|improve this answer
fcts = [do.this, do.that]
for fct in fcts:
    try:
        fct()
    except:
        foo.bar()
share|improve this answer

This doesn't scale up well, but for smaller blocks of code you could use a classic finite-state-machine:

states = [do.this, do.that]
state = 0
while state < len(states):
    try:
        states[state]()
    except:
        foo.bar()
    state += 1
share|improve this answer

Here's another alternative. Handle the error condition with a callback, so that after fixing the problem you can continue. The callback would basically contain exactly the same code you would put in the except block.

As a silly example, let's say that the exception you want to handle is a missing file, and that you have a way to deal with that problem (a default file or whatever). fileRetriever is the callback that knows how to deal with the problem. Then you would write:

def myOp(fileRetriever):

    f = acquireFile()
    if not f:
        f = fileRetriever()

    # continue with your stuff...

    f2 = acquireAnotherFile()
    if not f2:
        f2 = fileRetriever()

    # more stuff...


myOp(magicalCallback)

Note: I've never seen this design used in practice, but in specific situations I guess it might be usable.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.