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I currently work with some code that is repeated - more specifically, code that deals with the creation of model objects from DataRows and DataTables. I thought it would be safe to create Extension Methods to cut down on this repeated code, and add some syntactic sugar.

What I had Before (simplified):

public List<MyObject> GetThings(){
    DataSet dataSet = SomeDatabaseCall();

    var objects = new List<MyObject>();
    foreach(DataRow row in dataSet.Tables[0].Rows){
        //Process Row, create object, add to objects
    }
    return objects;
}
public MyObject GetThing(int id){
    DataSet dataSet = SomeDatabaseCall(id);
    DataRow row = dataSet.Tables[0].Rows[0];
    //Process Row, create object, return it
}

What I want After:

public List<MyObject> GetThings(){
    DataSet dataSet = SomeDatabaseCall();
    return dataSet.ToMyObjects(); //Internally calls the ToMyObject for each row
}
public MyObject GetThing(int id){
    DataSet dataSet = SomeDatabaseCall(id);
    DataRow row = dataSet.Tables[0].Rows[0];
    return row.ToMyObject();
}

The problem:

It was pointed out to me that using Extension Methods in this way is dangerous, and that I should use simple static functions that take a DataRow instead to process the data (essentially an Extension Method without the this parameter).

The question:

Would Extension Methods make sense in this scenario? And why would this way of doing things be considered dangerous?

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What did the person that said they were dangerous say was dangerous about them? –  Sorax Nov 19 '10 at 15:57
    
Essentially, if there are x number of these conversion Extension Methods for the DataRow class, there are (x - 1) of them that will (more than likely) fail when they're called, since that row contains a particular type of object. In short - Extension Methods causes the risk of mistake to rise sharply. My argument is that either one is inherently risky, since DataRow could contain anything. –  Pwninstein Nov 19 '10 at 16:09
    
I agree with your argument. And this is one of the reasons ORMs are so useful. –  Sorax Nov 19 '10 at 16:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I don't see anything dangerous about doing this; as long as you have control over the all of the code and the layout of your DataSet isn't going to be changed out from underneath you. This seems exactly like the kind of thing that Extension Methods were designed for.

I'd be curious to hear the reasoning behind the statement that this was a "dangerous" use.

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Extension methods are no more or less dangerous than making a static method because extension methods compile to static methods. They are just syntactic sugar for the programmers benefit. You could compare the IL on your own but here is an article with an example that might help you convince your coworker extension methods aren't dangerous: How do Extension Methods work?

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If you put the extension methods in a library that is specific to your project then you won't risk sullying other projects with your very specific extensions. I don't see how it's dangerous either.

UPDATE: Okay, I see your point, @Pwninstein: the DataRow that you call the extension on could very well be ANYTHING. However, having a method that takes a DataRow as an argument to make your object is no more dangerous.

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