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I just lost 2 hours of time because of a bug in the maven-compiler-plugin v2.0.2 that was fixed in version v2.3.2.

Apparently if you don't specify the version of the Maven compiler plugin, Maven 2.2.1 just gives you v2.0.2.

Our project uses 15+ Maven plugins. Some of them we want to pin down a certain version, but most of which (like the compiler plugin) we'd like to upgrade without having to think about it.

Is there a way to do this automatically with Maven, or do we have to assign someone the thankless task of researching possible Maven plug-in upgrades every month and then changing the PluginManagement version numbers in our parent POM?

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This is not directly applicable, but maven3 gives a warning when you don't provide a version number for plugins, siting that the warning is there for backward compatibility. –  Jeremy Heiler Nov 19 '10 at 16:49
    
@Jeremy Non backward compatible changes will be in Maven 3.1. Meanwhile, Maven 3.0 helps you to fix your poms. –  Pascal Thivent Nov 20 '10 at 15:09

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You could tie something like the versions-maven-plugin to your primary build such that you get a report on each build that shows whether your plugins are up to date.

See this link for detail on how: Display Plugin Updates

If you want to get fancy, have your CI server run the output of your maven build through a script to check for [WARNING] log entries that signal new versions and then have it notify relevant members of your team via email or some other notification.

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Holy crap...been using Maven for 2+ years, had no idea I could just run mvn versions:display-plugin-updates and get all the useful info. It still has to be done manually, but that really makes it easy. Same for regular dependencies too with mvn versions:display-dependency-updates -- thanks. –  HDave Nov 19 '10 at 17:59

Apparently if you don't specify the version of the Maven compiler plugin, Maven 2.2.1 just gives you v2.0.2.

Yes, as of Maven 2.0.9 (see MNG-3395) the versions of core and common plugins are fixed in the super POM and Maven disabled plugin version discovery for the sake of build reproducibility.

Our project uses 15+ Maven plugins. Some of them we want to pin down a certain version, but most of which (like the compiler plugin) we'd like to upgrade without having to think about it.

As hinted above, this is a bad idea. You simply don't want a maven build to suddenly start to fail because of some plugin update. In other words, you should use fixed versions and not doing so is a bad practice. Actually, Maven 3.0 promotes this practice and warns you if you don't do so. And in 3.1, you will have to specify a version (see MNG-1968).

Personally, I use the Maven Enforcer Plugin and its Require Plugin Versions rule to enforce this practice (which means the build will fail if you don't lock down plugins versions).

Is there a way to do this automatically with Maven, or do we have to assign someone the thankless task of researching possible Maven plug-in upgrades every month and then changing the PluginManagement version numbers in our parent POM?

As suggested, the Versions Maven Plugin has goals allowing to check if there are more recent versions of plugins, dependencies, etc (and note that -cpu is deprecated in Maven 3.0 and will be removed from future versions).

But the real question is: why do you want to always use ultimate versions? IMO, there is no good reason to do so, you should upgrade only if there is something to fix ("if it ain't broke, don't fix it").

Bottom line: use fixed plugins versions and forget automatic updates, version ranges, etc.

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+1 for this: 'Personally, I use the Maven Enforcer Plugin and its Require Plugin Versions rule to enforce this practice (which means the build will fail if you don't lock down plugins versions).' –  javamonkey79 Nov 19 '10 at 19:39
    
@javamonkey79: That's one of my favorite plugins. I use it in all my builds. –  Pascal Thivent Nov 19 '10 at 20:32
    
@javamonkey79: BTW, feel free to cast the vote :) –  Pascal Thivent Nov 19 '10 at 20:33
    
I thought I already gave you the +1...oops. Did now :) –  javamonkey79 Nov 19 '10 at 21:04

The second time I get to write this today:

Try using the -cpu flag. Output from mvn -help:

usage: mvn [options] [<goal(s)>] [<phase(s)>]

Options:
 -cpu,--check-plugin-updates            Force upToDate check for any
                                        relevant registered plugins
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FWIW, this option is deprecated in Maven 3.0. –  Pascal Thivent Nov 19 '10 at 18:32

You could also use version ranges in your plugins.

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Baaaaaaaaaaaad practice, don't do this. –  Pascal Thivent Nov 19 '10 at 18:32
    
@Pascal: Funny you say this. For dependencies our team has sorta agreed that this is more pain that it is worth. But used appropriately with plugins, is it such a bad thing? That also begs the question to me: If it's bad practice in general, then what is its use case? –  javamonkey79 Nov 19 '10 at 19:02
    
In my opinion, there is no valid use case (and while Maven does support version ranges, I believe it doesn't encourage using them). –  Pascal Thivent Nov 19 '10 at 19:22
    
In theory, if folks adhered to versioning standards (such as those from Apache) then one could feasibly use a reasonable range (like up to the next minor rev). However, I think the problem lies in the failure to adhere to standards. Nonetheless, I see your point and would discourage them in 99% of all use cases - I just wish that adherence to proper versioning was better, such that ranges could by more usable. –  javamonkey79 Nov 19 '10 at 19:36
    
In my opinion, the biggest problem is not really version resolution (this can work when following standards as you pointed out), the problem is that version ranges can cause unwanted behavioral changes of your build and hunting such problems is a pain (you can't diff POMs, you can't easily revert to a working state). Version ranges are an entrance to the gates of hell. –  Pascal Thivent Nov 19 '10 at 20:30

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