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For example I have this code:

<style>
    .wrapper { width:1200px; height:800px; }
    .column { width:900px; height:800px; margin:auto -0; }
</style>

<div class="wrapper">
     <div class="column"> </div>
</div>

I want a mousedown function to be called when you click outside of the "column" but not inside the column. Is this possible?

My current non-working code is:

$(".wrapper:not(.column)").mousedown(function(){
     alert("test");
});

UPDATE: I am actually using classes, not IDs.

share|improve this question
    
you don't need the :not(#column) - #wrapper will suffice since it's selecting by id. –  Brandon Montgomery Nov 19 '10 at 17:45
    
In my actual code, I'm using classes. Will this effect anything? –  Dave Nov 19 '10 at 17:48
    
still, your selector won't select the .column div since it doesn't have the "wrapper" class, so you still don't need the :not(.column). –  Brandon Montgomery Nov 19 '10 at 17:53
    
Using the classes will mean you need a more general approach, have a look at my answer to see how. –  Orbling Nov 19 '10 at 18:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The following will work by stopping mousedown events on elements with class column from bubbling, and will work so long as column elements are strictly contained within wrapper elements.

$(".wrapper").mousedown(function(evt) {
    alert("Mouse down!");
});

$(".column").mousedown(function(evt) {
    evt.stopPropagation();
});
share|improve this answer
    
This worked! Is there any reason the other examples are more proper in any way? –  Dave Nov 19 '10 at 17:59
    
No. It's the same idea as Brandon Montgomery's answer but fully implemented. –  Tim Down Nov 19 '10 at 18:03

What you'll want to do is put a mousedown event handler on your #column div also, but in that event handler, you want to prevent the event from bubbling up to its container elements.

$("#column").mousedown(function (e) {
  var event = e || window.event;
  if (event.stopPropagation) {
    event.stopPropagation();
  } else {
    event.cancelBubble = true;
  } 
});

Here's a full example: http://jsfiddle.net/YrXSM/

share|improve this answer
    
I think in jQuery e.stopPropagation() should work across all browsers. –  Daff Nov 19 '10 at 17:51
    
--nevermind, the jsfiddle link was helpful. thank you.-- –  Brad Christie Nov 19 '10 at 17:52
    
You are using jQuery and therefore don't need to do that IE compatibility stuff. The event object is passed in into the handler, and e.stopPropagation() works inside the handler. –  Šime Vidas Nov 19 '10 at 17:59

I don't think you can stop the function from being called from the children, but you can detect what was clicked. I'm not sure if this is the best way to do it, but this should work:

$("#wrapper").mousedown(function(e){
  if($(e.target).attr('id') == 'wrapper')
  {
    //do stuff
  }
});
share|improve this answer
$(".wrapper").mousedown(function(e) {
    if (this !== e.target) { return; }
    alert("test"); 
});

So, basically, we are testing whether the .wrapper element was clicked directly. If not, we disregard the event by returning.

share|improve this answer
$("#wrapper").mousedown(function(){
     alert("test");
});
share|improve this answer

The way I would approach this is to assign another event to #container onMouseDown that does nothing, and then prevents the event from bubbling up.

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The example given using e.target is the best option, however there is the possibility in the general case that your .mousedown() function is bound to a more complicated selector, if that is the case you can use the following code.

$(".wrapper").mousedown(function(e){
    if ($('.wrapper').filter(e.target).size() > 0) {
         alert("test");
    }
});

Demo at: http://jsfiddle.net/9RPcb/1/

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