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I have append <li> tag with close class span tag

HTML code

<ul id="keyword">

</ul>

jquery

$("#btnadd").click(function() {
                addkey = document.getElementById("txtaddkey").value;
                if(addkey!=""){
                $('#keyword').append('<li><span>'+addkey+'</span><span class=\"amountin\"><a href=\"#\">$0.05</a> $ <input type=\"text\" maxlength=\"5\"/></span><span class=\'close ui-icon \'></span></li>');
                $('#txtaddkey').val('');
                }
            });
    $(".close").click(function (){
                $(this).parent().remove();  
            });

after li append in the ul tag I am try remove the li tag by click close icon but event not working.

Could you please any help me.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could assign the click directly to the newly create element:

$("#btnadd").click(function() {
             // Made it a local variable by using "var"
            var addkey = document.getElementById("txtaddkey").value;
            if(addkey!=""){
                $('<li><span>'+addkey+'</span><span class=\"amountin\"><a href=\"#\">$0.05</a> $ <input type=\"text\" maxlength=\"5\"/></span><span class=\'close ui-icon \'></span></li>')
                    .find('.close').click(function (){
                        $(this).parent().remove();  
                    })
                    .end().appendTo('#keyword');
                $('#txtaddkey').val('');
            }
        });

or if there are going to be several of these, better to use .delegate() as seen in @Nick's answer.

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Use .delegate() here, like this:

$("#keyword").delegate(".close", "click", function (){
  $(this).parent().remove();  
});

.delegate() works by adding an event handler on #keyword (the <ul>) which listens for events to bubble up...it works on current and newly added .close elements beneath it. The less efficient .live() version looks like this:

$(".close").live("click", function (){
  $(this).parent().remove();  
});
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your answer also correct but I have use below code. Thanks Nick!! –  Elankeeran Nov 19 '10 at 19:14
    
@Elankeeran - you can do this...but it's far less efficient, why not attach the handler just once? –  Nick Craver Nov 19 '10 at 19:22
    
@Elankeeran - That's a separate question, you should ask it as such so it helps others. –  Nick Craver Nov 19 '10 at 20:23
    
sure question posted –  Elankeeran Nov 19 '10 at 20:31
1  
@Adam - It simply listens at a higher level so the event (which would bubble anyway) gets caught there. The cost is that the listener is checking all events of that type that go through it. For example: another click on a child that doesn't match the .close selector is going to be checked if it matches .close when the event happens, nothing will happen if it doesn't...but that check still has to happen. So .delegate() isn't the best for say <body>, but even then you wouldn't notice any difference unless you're page was * extremely* large and complicated...and probably not even then. –  Nick Craver Oct 15 '12 at 13:01
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