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I just can't seem to find a way on the command line to say "copy all the files from directory A to directory B, but if the file already exists in directory B, don't overwrite it, no matter which file is newer, and don't prompt me."

I have been through copy, move, xcopy & robocopy, and the closest I can get is that you can tell robocopy "copy A to B, but don't overwrite newer files with older files," but that doesn't work for me. I looked at xxcopy, but discarded it, as I don't want to have a third-party dependancy on a VS post-build event that will require other SVN users to have that tool installed in order to do the build.

What I want to do is add a command line to the post-build event in VS2010 so that the files that are generated from the T4 templates for new EF model objects get distributed to the project folders to which they belong, but regenerated files for existing objects don't overwrite potentially edited destination files.

Since the T4 template regenerates, the source file is always newer and I can't use the "newer" switch reliably, I don't think.

I use partial classes for those items for which I can, but there are other things I generate that can't use partial classes (e.g. generating a default EditorTemplate or DisplayTemplate *.ascx file).

Any one have any similar problems they have solved?

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Are you familiar with cmd.exe's for command? If not, I recommend you run for /? and use that. –  Gabe Nov 19 '10 at 19:54

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted
For %F In ("C:\From\*.*") Do If Not Exist "C:\To\%~nxF" Copy "%F" "C:\To\%~nxF"
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ECHO this allows spaces in the file names and file paths (Copy "%F" threw me for a loop for a few minutes). : For %F In ("C:\From*.*") Do If Not Exist "C:\To\%~nxF" Copy "%F" "C:\To\%~nxF" –  TamusJRoyce Sep 7 '11 at 4:16
    
Corrected. Thank you Tamus. –  Stu Sep 1 '12 at 19:44

Robocopy, or "Robust File Copy", is a command-line directory replication command. It has been available as part of the Windows Resource Kit starting with Windows NT 4.0, and was introduced as a standard feature of Windows Vista, Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008.

   robocopy c:\Sourcepath c:\Destpath /E /XC /XN /XO

To elaborate:

  • /E makes Robocopy recursively copy subdirectories, including empty ones.
  • /XC excludes existing files with the same timestamp, but different file sizes. Robocopy normally overwrites those.
  • /XN excludes existing files newer than the copy in the source directory. Robocopy normally overwrites those.
  • /XO excludes existing files older than the copy in the source directory. Robocopy normally overwrites those.

With the Changed, Older, and Newer classes excluded, Robocopy does exactly what the original poster wants - without needing to load a scripting environment.

References: Technet, Wikipedia
Download from: Microsoft Download Link

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By 'exclude' do you mean 'skip' or 'delete/remove'? –  André Terra Oct 14 '13 at 17:37
    
@Andre Terra: Skip, normally. If you're using the /MIR flag, it might remove them. I haven't tested that. –  Hydrargyrum Dec 4 '13 at 23:33

Belisarius' solution is good.

To elaborate on that slightly terse answer:

  • /E makes Robocopy recursively copy subdirectories, including empty ones.
  • /XC excludes existing files with the same timestamp, but different file sizes. Robocopy normally overwrites those.
  • /XN excludes existing files newer than the copy in the source directory. Robocopy normally overwrites those.
  • /XO excludes existing files older than the copy in the source directory. Robocopy normally overwrites those.

With the Changed, Older, and Newer classes excluded, Robocopy does exactly what the original poster wants - without needing to load a scripting environment.

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I know this is old but maybe helpful to anyone coming later :)

You can try this: echo n|copy /-y <SOURCE> <DESTINATION>

-y simply prompts before overwriting and we can pipe n to all those questions. So this would in essence just copy non-existing files. :)

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Here it is in batch file form:

@echo off
set source=%1
set dest=%2
for %%f in (%source%\*) do if not exist "%dest%\%%~nxf" copy "%%f" "%dest%\%%~nxf"
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I just want to clarify something from my own testing.

@Hydrargyrum wrote:

  • /XN excludes existing files newer than the copy in the source directory. Robocopy normally overwrites those.
  • /XO excludes existing files older than the copy in the source directory. Robocopy normally overwrites those.

This is actually backwards. XN does "eXclude Newer" files but it excludes files that are newer than the copy in the destination directory. XO does "eXclude Older", but it excludes files that are older than the copy in the destination directory.

Of course do your own testing as always.

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Is this an answer to the original question, or a comment on someone else's answer? –  ASGM Apr 16 '13 at 13:06
1  
Is Hydrargyrum's answer that has +25 votes as of time of writing an answer to the original question, or a comment on someone else's answer? –  mo. May 9 '13 at 22:28

Robocopy can be downloaded here for systems where it is not installed already. (I.e. Windows Server 2003.)

http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=17657 (no reboot required for installation)

Remember to set your path to the robocopy exe. You do this by right clicking "my computer"> properties>advanced>"Environment Variables", then find the path system variable and add this to the end: ";C:\Program Files\Windows Resource Kits\Tools" or wherever you installed it. Make sure to leave the path variable strings that are already there and just append the addtional path.

once the path is set, you can run the command that belisarius suggests. It works great.

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