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I recently came across this code:

    public static class ClientBaseExtender 
{ 
    /// <summary> 
    /// Tries to execute async service call. If <see cref="TimeoutException"/> occured retries again. 
    /// </summary> 
    /// <typeparam name="TChannel">ServiceClient class.</typeparam> 
    /// <typeparam name="TArgs">Type of service client method return argument.</typeparam> 
    /// <param name="client">ServiceClient instance.</param> 
    /// <param name="tryExecute">Delegate that execute starting of service call.</param> 
    /// <param name="onCompletedSubcribe">Delegate that subcribes an event handler to the OnCompleted event of the service client method.</param> 
    /// <param name="onCompleted">Delegate that executes when service call is succeeded.</param> 
    /// <param name="onError">Delegate that executes when service call fails.</param> 
    /// <param name="maxAttempts">Maximum attempts to execute service call before error if <see cref="TimeoutException"/> occured (by default 5).</param> 
    public static void ExecuteAsyncRepeatedly<TChannel, TArgs>(this ClientBase<TChannel> client, Action tryExecute, 
                                                               Action<EventHandler<TArgs>> onCompletedSubcribe, EventHandler<TArgs> onCompleted, 
                                                               EventHandler<TArgs> onError, int maxAttempts) 
        where TChannel : class 
        where TArgs : AsyncCompletedEventArgs 
    { 
        int attempts = 0; 
        var serviceName = client.GetType().Name; 

        onCompletedSubcribe((s, e) => 
                                { 
                                    if (e.Error == null) // Everything is OK 
                                    { 
                                        if (onCompleted != null) 
                                            onCompleted(s, e); 

                                        ((ICommunicationObject)client).Close(); 
                                        Debug.WriteLine("[{1}] Service '{0}' closed.", serviceName, DateTime.Now); 
                                    } 
                                    else if (e.Error is TimeoutException) 
                                    { 
                                        attempts++; 

                                        if (attempts >= maxAttempts) // Final timeout after n attempts 
                                        { 
                                            Debug.WriteLine("[{2}], Final Timeout occured in '{0}' service after {1} attempts.", serviceName, attempts, DateTime.Now); 

                                            if (onError != null) 
                                                onError(s, e); 
                                            client.Abort(); 

                                            Debug.WriteLine("[{1}] Service '{0}' aborted.", serviceName, DateTime.Now); 
                                            return; 
                                        } 

                                        // Local timeout 
                                        Debug.WriteLine("[{2}] Timeout occured in '{0}' service (attempt #{1}).", serviceName, attempts, DateTime.Now); 

                                        Debug.WriteLine("[{2}] Attempt #{0} to execute call to '{1}' service.", attempts + 1, serviceName, DateTime.Now); 
                                        tryExecute(); // Try again. 
                                    } 
                                    else 
                                    { 
                                        if (onError != null) 
                                            onError(s, e); 
                                        client.Abort(); 
                                        Debug.WriteLine("[{1}] Service '{0}' aborted.", serviceName, DateTime.Now); 
                                    } 
                                }); 

        Debug.WriteLine("[{2}] Attempt #{0} to execute call to '{1}' service.", attempts + 1, serviceName, DateTime.Now); 
        tryExecute(); // First attempt to execute 
    } 
}

    public void GetData()
    {
    var client = new MyServiceClient(); 
     client.ExecuteAsyncRepeatedly(() => client.MyOperationAsync(...), 
    (EventHandler<MyOperationCompletedEventArgs> handler)                                        =>client.MyOperationCompleted += handler, 
    (s, e) => // OnCompleted 
        { 
            Do(e.Result); 
        }, 
    (s, e) => // OnError 
        { 
            HandleError(e.Error); 
        } 
); 

}

The problem is, I have a button that fires this code off. When the button is pushed more than once the handler gets added again and again. This is a problem because the code will fire as many times as the user has pushed the button. How can I remove the handler created with the lambda expression in this code so it will only run once?

Thanks!

EDIT:

I'm calling the code like this from my button click command:

            _dataService.GetData(GetDataCompleted);

        private void GetDataComplete(Data data)
    {
        //do something with data        }
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I'd suggest fixing that code block, half of it is not marked as code. Use the 010101 icon after highlighting your code block. –  m-y Nov 19 '10 at 21:16
    
Can you add in the actual code where the button click handler is? There is not enough here to determine why that handler is getting added many times. –  Steve Danner Nov 19 '10 at 21:36
    
I don't know what you mean, it looks like the code is showing up properly within the code blocks to me. –  adminJaxon Nov 20 '10 at 17:37
    
steve, please see my useage of the code in my edits above. thanks for your help! –  adminJaxon Nov 20 '10 at 17:45
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1 Answer

I think that you can solve it by implementing a push-pull strategy in your code-behind. I propose something similar to this:

 bool _requestPending;
 readonly object _lock = new object();

 void OnClick (...)
 {
     lock(_lock)
     {
        if (_requestPending == false)
        {
            _dataService.GetData(GetDataCompleted);
            _requestPending = true;
        }
     }
 }
 private void GetDataComplete(Data data)
 {
     lock(_lock)
     {
        try
        {
           //do something with data 
        }
        finally
        {
           _requestPending = false;
        }  
     }           
 }

Even better, disable the UI button when you have a pending request. You wouldn't have any concurrency issues with accessing and modifying the _requestPending from different threads, but still you could suffer a race condition if the service response is fast enough, so still better to synchronize the two blocks of code.

Anyway, personally I don't like this implementation for what you're trying to achieve. The code is quite confusing, and makes it hard to foresee problems that may arise. Make sure that:

  • you provide a way to abort a request and reenable the button again

  • the code that updates the screen is executed by the UI thread

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