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I have a simple 2-column layout with a footer that clears both the right and left div in my markup. My problem is that I can't get the footer to stay at the bottom of the page in all browsers. It works if the content pushes the footer down, but that's not always the case.

Update:

It's not working properly in Firefox. I'm seeing a strip of background color below the footer when there's not enough content on the page to push the footer all the way down to the bottom of the browser window. Unfortunately, this is the default state of the page.

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11 Answers 11

up vote 91 down vote accepted

Sticky footer on Google:

  1. Have a <div> with class="wrapper" for your content.

  2. Right before the closing </div> of the wrapper place the <div class="push"></div>.

  3. Right after the closing </div> of the wrapper place the <div class="footer"></div>.

* {
    margin: 0;
}
html, body {
    height: 100%;
}
.wrapper {
    min-height: 100%;
    height: auto !important;
    height: 100%;
    margin: 0 auto -142px; /* the bottom margin is the negative value of the footer's height */
}
.footer, .push {
    height: 142px; /* .push must be the same height as .footer */
}
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12  
The push div is actually inside the wrapper div, not after it. –  Travis Jun 29 '09 at 20:23
5  
It does not work in asp.net with <form> tag –  jlp Feb 28 '10 at 12:59
3  
@jlp: You need to add the form tag to the height:100% statement, else it will break the sticky footer. Like this: html, body, form {height: 100%;} –  dazbradbury Mar 9 '12 at 13:21
1  
You should really edit the answer to include @Travis's suggestion. "The push div is actually inside the wrapper div, not after it." –  sjobe Jun 20 '12 at 9:01
1  
The detailed explanation with the demo is provided in this site: CSS Sticky Footer –  mohitp Mar 22 '13 at 9:15

You could use position: absolute following to put the footer at the bottom of the page, but then make sure your 2 columns have the appropriate bottom-margin so that they never get occluded by the footer.

#footer {
    position: absolute;
    bottom: 0px;
    width: 100%;
}
#content, #sidebar { 
    margin-bottom: 5em; 
}
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I've tried this with my similar setup (two columns + footer) and it does not work. –  isomorphismes Mar 15 '12 at 6:44
1  
in what way does it not work? –  Jimmy Mar 15 '12 at 17:18
1  
It overlap with content if content grow. –  Satya Prakash Oct 17 '13 at 15:03
1  
that's why content has the margin-bottom. you have to set it to whatever fixed height you make the footer. –  Jimmy Oct 17 '13 at 18:06

Here is a solution with jQuery that works like a charm. Tested it in Firefox, Chrome, Safari and Opera.

$(document).ready(function() {
    var height_diff = $(window).height() - $('body').height();
    if ( height_diff > 0 ) {
        $('#footer').css( 'margin-top', height_diff );
    }
});

What it does is: it checks if the height of the window is greater than the height of the body. If it is, then it changes the margin-top of the footer to compensate.

If your footer has a margin-top (of 50 pixels, for example), you will need to change the last part for:

css( 'margin-top', height_diff + 50 )
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Amazing it worked like a charm. Thanks Felipe Schenone –  ggsmartboy Aug 1 '13 at 11:55

Set the CSS for the #footer to:

position: absolute;
bottom: 0;

You will then need to add a padding or margin to the bottom of your #sidebar and #content to match the height of #footer or when they overlap, the #footer will cover them.

Also, if I remember correctly, IE6 has a problem with the bottom: 0 CSS. You might have to use a JS solution for IE6 (if you care about IE6 that is).

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Try putting a container div (with overflow:auto) around the content and sidebar.

If that doesn't work, do you have any screenshots or example links where the footer isn't displayed properly?

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One solution would be to set the min-height for the boxes. Unfortunately it seems that it's not well supported by IE (surprise).

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I'll add to @Jimmy: You also need to have to declare absolute (or relative) positioning to the element that contains the footer. In your case, it's the body element.

Edit: I tested it on your page with firebug and it seemed to work very well...

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Here is a site with a floating sticky footer that is technically impressive (whether you like the EXACT aesthetics or not):

http://alltop.com/

(click through to a category like Science to see the floating footer in IE)

You may look into their CSS and see if you can track all their tricks. I find I have my best CSS luck by starting with something that works and trimming away the parts I don't need.

Lesser artists borrow, great artists steal.
— Steve jobs
(quoting Pablo Picasso)

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None of these pure css solutions work properly with dynamically resizing content (at least on firefox and Safari) e.g., if you have a background set on the container div, the page and then resize (adding a few rows) table inside the div, the table can stick out of the bottom of the styled area, i.e., you can have half the table in white on black theme and half the table complete white because both the font-color and background color is white. It's basically unfixable with themeroller pages.

Nested div multi-column layout is an ugly hack and the 100% min-height body/container div for sticking footer is an uglier hack.

The only none-script solution that works on all the browsers I've tried: a much simpler/shorter table with thead (for header)/tfoot (for footer)/tbody (td's for any number of columns) and 100% height. But this have perceived semantic and SEO disadvantages (tfoot must appear before tbody. ARIA roles may help decent search engines though).

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Use absolute positioning and z-index to create a sticky footer div at any resolution using the following steps:

  • Create a footer div with position: absolute; bottom: 0; and the desired height
  • Set the padding of the footer to add whitespace between the content bottom and the window bottom
  • Create a container div that wraps the body content with position: relative; min-height: 100%;
  • Set the html, body, and container div to height: 100% for IE6
  • Add bottom padding to the main content div that is equal to the height plus padding of the footer
  • Set the z-index of the footer greater than the container div if the footer is clipped

Here is an example:

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
  <title>Sticky Footer</title>
  <meta charset="utf-8">
  <style>
  .wrapper { position: relative; min-height: 100%; }
  .footer { position: absolute; bottom:0; width: 100%; height: 200px; padding-top: 100px; background-color: gray; }
  .column { height: 2000px; padding-bottom: 300px; background-color: green; }
  </style>
</head>
<body>
  <div class="wrapper">
    <div class="column">
      <span>hello</span>
    </div>
    <div class="footer">
      <p>This is a test. This is only a test...</p>
    </div>
  </div>
</body>
</html>
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Use CSS vh units!

Probably the most obvious and non-hacky way to go about a sticky footer would be to make use of the new css viewport units.

Take for example the following simple markup:

<header>header goes here</header>
<div class="content">This page has little content</div>
<footer>This is my footer</footer>

If the header is say 80px high and the footer is 40px high, then we can make our sticky footer with one single rule on the content div:

.content {
    min-height: calc(100vh - 120px);
    /* 80px header + 40px footer = 120px  */
}

Which means: let the height of the content div be at least 100% of the viewport height minus the combined heights of the header and footer.

That's it.

* {
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}
header {
    background: yellow;
    height: 80px;
}
.content {
    min-height: calc(100vh - 120px);
    /* 80px header + 40px footer = 120px  */
    background: pink;
}
footer {
    height: 40px;
    background: aqua;
}
<header>header goes here</header>
<div class="content">This page has little content</div>
<footer>This is my footer</footer>

... and here's how the same code works with lots of content in the content div:

* {
    margin:0;
    padding:0;
}
header {
    background: yellow;
    height: 80px;
}
.content {
    min-height: calc(100vh - 120px);
    /* 80px header + 40px footer = 120px  */
    background: pink;
}
footer {
    height: 40px;
    background: aqua;
}
<header>header goes here</header>
<div class="content">Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate velit esse molestie consequat, vel illum dolore eu feugiat nulla facilisis at vero eros et accumsan et iusto odio dignissim qui blandit praesent luptatum zzril delenit augue duis dolore te feugait nulla facilisi. Nam liber tempor cum soluta nobis eleifend option congue nihil imperdiet doming id quod mazim placerat facer possim assum. Typi non habent claritatem insitam; est usus legentis in iis qui facit eorum claritatem. Investigationes demonstraverunt lectores legere me lius quod ii legunt saepius. Claritas est etiam processus dynamicus, qui sequitur mutationem consuetudium lectorum. Mirum est notare quam littera gothica, quam nunc putamus parum claram, anteposuerit litterarum formas humanitatis per seacula quarta decima et quinta decima. Eodem modo typi, qui nunc nobis videntur parum clari, fiant sollemnes in futurum.Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit, sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat. Ut wisi enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exerci tation ullamcorper suscipit lobortis nisl ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis autem vel eum iriure dolor in hendrerit in vulputate velit esse molestie consequat, vel illum dolore eu feugiat nulla facilisis at vero eros et accumsan et iusto odio dignissim qui blandit praesent luptatum zzril delenit augue duis dolore te feugait nulla facilisi. Nam liber tempor cum soluta nobis eleifend option congue nihil imperdiet doming id quod mazim placerat facer possim assum. Typi non habent claritatem insitam; est usus legentis in iis qui facit eorum claritatem. Investigationes demonstraverunt lectores legere me lius quod ii legunt saepius. Claritas est etiam processus dynamicus, qui sequitur mutationem consuetudium lectorum. Mirum est notare quam littera gothica, quam nunc putamus parum claram, anteposuerit litterarum formas humanitatis per seacula quarta decima et quinta decima. Eodem modo typi, qui nunc nobis videntur parum clari, fiant sollemnes in futurum.
</div>
<footer>
    This is my footer
</footer>

NB:

1) The height of the header and footer must be known

2) Old versions of IE (IE8-) and Android (4.4-) don't support viewport units. (caniuse)

3) Once upon a time webkit had a problem with viewport units within a calc rule. This has indeed been fixed (see here) so there's no problem there. However if you're looking to avoid using calc for some reason you can get around that using negative margins and padding with box-sizing -

Like so:

* {
    margin:0;padding:0;
}
header {
    background: yellow;
    height: 80px;
    position:relative;
}
.content {
    min-height: 100vh;
    background: pink;
    margin: -80px 0 -40px;
    padding: 80px 0 40px;
    box-sizing:border-box;
}
footer {
    height: 40px;
    background: aqua;
}
<header>header goes here</header>
<div class="content">Lorem ipsum 
</div>
<footer>
    This is my footer
</footer>

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This is pretty much the best solution I’ve seen here, worked even in my strange case with some contents of the .content overflowing into the footer for who-knows-what-reason. And I guess that with sth like Sass and variables, it could be ever more flexible. –  themarketka Dec 5 at 20:16

protected by Community Dec 1 '11 at 1:29

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