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I have a UIView and within it I've drawn a line using Core Graphics by overriding drawRect. This view also contains one subview which also draws a line. However, whilst both views are using pretty much the same code (for testing purposes at least), the lines drawn on them do not appear the same:

Image problem

As you can see - the dashed line at the top is noticeably thicker than the bottom one and I have no idea why. Below is the code used by the two UIViews in their drawRect methods. If you have any idea why this is happening then I'd appreciate your help and advice!

First View:

CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

CGContextSetStrokeColorWithColor(context, [[UIColor whiteColor] CGColor]);

CGFloat dashes[] = {1,1};

CGContextSetLineDash(context, 0.0, dashes, 2);
CGContextSetLineWidth(context, 0.6);

CGContextMoveToPoint(context, CGRectGetMinX(rect), CGRectGetMaxY(rect));
CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, CGRectGetMaxX(rect), CGRectGetMaxY(rect));

CGContextStrokePath(context);

SubUIView *view = [[SubUIView alloc] initWithFrame:rect];
[self addSubview:view];
[view release];

The view is definitely only being drawn once. I appreciate drawRect may not be the best place for adding a subview but the problem remains even with it added in the main initWithFrame method.

Second View:

CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

CGContextSetStrokeColorWithColor(context, [[UIColor whiteColor] CGColor]);

CGFloat dashes[] = {1,1};

CGContextSetLineDash(context, 0.0, dashes, 2);
CGContextSetLineWidth(context, 0.6);

CGContextMoveToPoint(context, CGRectGetMinX(rect), CGRectGetMidY(rect));
CGContextAddLineToPoint(context, CGRectGetMaxX(rect), CGRectGetMidY(rect));

CGContextStrokePath(context);
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1  
Why are you adding a subview in the first view's drawRect:? –  jer Nov 19 '10 at 22:34
    
@jer: Does it necessarily matter? I can add the subview from another method such as initWithFrame but there's still a difference in line thickness. Unless I'm not meant to add subviews to a view which 'draws' on itself and hence the problem (?), but I haven't read this anywhere... yet. –  JoeR Nov 19 '10 at 22:41
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@JoeR, yes it may matter - you add subviews each time your view draws itself so you can end with several identical subviews placed over each other - and that may cause subview lines appear thicker as they were drawn several times –  Vladimir Nov 19 '10 at 22:44
    
@jer: Right, that did cross my mind. I added an NSLog in drawRect and can confirm it is only being drawn once. I also moved the point where the subview was being added out of drawRect and the problem still remains. –  JoeR Nov 19 '10 at 22:47
1  
You mean it has only been drawn once so far. It will be drawn each time anything (your code or Apple's) sets it as needing display (minus the effects of 60-fps coalescing, assuming that exists on iOS). It can even be sent drawRect: multiple times per pass, if it's been set as needing display in multiple discrete section rectangles. Just because you haven't seen drawRect: get called more than once in your testing doesn't mean it won't happen. Assume it will and code accordingly. –  Peter Hosey Nov 19 '10 at 22:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It could be a result of anti-aliasing if your rect does not fall on integers. You can disable anti-aliasing with CGContextSetShouldAntialias( context, NO ). I think there's also a function for making a rect integral, but I can't remember what it is.

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Thanks! This fixed it! I suppose the fact that neither line was solid white as specified by calling CGContextSetStrokeColorWithColor should have been a clue that some anti-aliasing was going on. I do wonder why this happened in the subview and not in the main view, but for now I'll just be thankful it's working! –  JoeR Nov 19 '10 at 23:05
3  
It's CGRectIntegral() –  nielsbot May 5 '11 at 6:59

First, you should fix the problem of the drawing code being WET*. You say you're doing this “for testing purposes”, but this actually makes testing harder, since you have to change both pieces of code and/or keep straight which version you're working on. The worst case is when you change both pieces of code in different ways and have to merge them by hand.

I'd say move the dashed-line code to the subview, add properties for anything the two pieces of code need to do differently, and create two subviews (and not in drawRect:—seriously).

As for the actual problem: Well, I don't see a big image, I see a tiny image, and I can only guess that the greater boldness of the upper line than that of the lower line means that the upper line is thicker.

By the way, the rect is not necessarily the bounds of your image. Don't ever assume that it is, or you will get funky drawing when it isn't. Assume that it some section of the bounds—possibly, but possibly not, the whole thing. When you mean [self bounds], say [self bounds].

The problem is most likely the difference between CGRectGetMidY([self bounds]) and CGRectGetMaxY([self bounds]). One includes a fraction that splits a pixel, whereas the other is a multiple of one pixel or close to it. (Not necessarily a multiple of 1—on a Retina Display, 1 pt = 2 pixels, so 1 pixel = 0.5 pt.) Try flooring both numbers and optionally adding 0.5, and see which way you like better.

There's no way to make it work out perfectly with a 0.6-pt line width. There is simply no whole number of pixels that works out to. All you can do is work out what looks best and do that.

*Written Elsewhere Too, the opposite of DRY.

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Thanks for your input. I swapped the big image out when writing the question as the small one seemed to do the job. i.imgur.com/KalTm.png - if that helps. Anyway, I get the issue with the point size I'm using, I've upped it to 1.0 but even at this the same problem occurs. Turning off anti aliasing does the trick though as per the accepted answer. –  JoeR Nov 19 '10 at 23:56

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