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My program is as follows;

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{
        char string[] = "Gentlemen start your engines!";
        printf("That string is %s characters long.\r\n", strlen(string));
        return 0;
}

I'm compiling under gcc, and although it doesn't give me any errors the program crashes every time I run it. The code seems to be fine from examples I've seen. It'd be great to know if I'm doing anything wrong.

Thanks.

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Thanks everybody. Should have seen that, I've just started with C and had been playing around with text programs using strings only thus far, so %s just automatically came to mind. –  PardonMyRhetoric Nov 20 '10 at 8:52
4  
+1 because I learned that I should have been using %zu all along instead of merely %u or even %d –  Ben Jackson Nov 20 '10 at 9:02
1  
If you're using GCC, crank up your errors with -Wall or maybe -Wextra or maybe -Werror. GCC is able to check the format string and warn about incorrect arguments for printf-, scanf-, strftime- and strfmon-like functions. –  Chris Lutz Nov 20 '10 at 19:02
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5 Answers

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Using incorrect format specifier in printf() invokes Undefined Behaviour. Correct format specifier should be %zu (not %d) because the return type of strlen() is size_t

Note: Length modifier z in %zu represents an integer of length same as size_t

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When did gcc on Windows stop using the Microsoft CRT? I got errors last time I used %zu on MinGW, or is there another gcc version that uses glib? –  Pete Kirkham Nov 20 '10 at 10:56
    
@Pete: You shouldn't get any such error. Make sure you are using latest version of MinGW with C99 support. –  Prasoon Saurav Nov 20 '10 at 11:20
    
Sweet! Any ETA for MingW implementing emulated UTF-8 locale on top of the windows _wfopen etc. functions? –  R.. Nov 20 '10 at 12:31
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You have wrong format specifier. %s is used for strings but you are passing size_t (strlen(string)). Using incorrect format specifier in printf() invokes undefined behaviour. Use %zu instead because the return type of strlen() is size_t.

So change

 printf("That string is %s characters long.\r\n", strlen(string));

to:

 printf("That string is %zu characters long.\r\n", strlen(string));

Since you are using gcc have a look here for more info what can be passed to printf

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1  
Using gcc for compilation doesn't necessarily mean that you are using the glibc for executing your code. –  Roland Illig Nov 20 '10 at 11:38
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 printf("That string is %d characters long.\r\n", strlen(string));

instead:

 printf("That string is %s characters long.\r\n", strlen(string));
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one morething, change the variable name "string" to someother. "string" is reserved word. –  Mohamed Saligh Nov 20 '10 at 8:46
    
Ok, thanks. I used 'string' to throw together a quick program that got string length, as I'm writing a program that detects palindromes and wanted to get a feel as to how I'd do it. I'll keep in mind not to use it in the future though. –  PardonMyRhetoric Nov 20 '10 at 9:12
    
Syntactically, string is not a keyword. It is though, as all names starting with str, mem or wcs, "reserved for future use" as a string function in the <string.h> header. (source: ISO C99, 7.26.11) –  Roland Illig Nov 20 '10 at 11:37
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You have a problem here printf("That string is %s characters long.\r\n", strlen(string));

put

printf("That string is %d characters long.\r\n", strlen(string)); %d because you want to printthe length of str (strlen returns number)

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Program crashes because formatting routine tries to access a string at address 0x0000001D which is the result of strlen() where is nothing like a string and likely there's no acessible memory at all.

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