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I have a list like this:

l = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b'], ['g', 'h', 'r', 'w']]

I want to pick an element from each list and combine them to be a string.

For example: 'aag', 'aah', 'aar', 'aaw', 'abg', 'abh' ....

However, the length of the list l and the length of each inner list are all unknown before the program is running. So how can I do want I want?

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2  
Do you want all combinations, or a random one? –  Thomas Nov 20 '10 at 16:36
    
All combinations –  wong2 Nov 20 '10 at 16:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Take a previous solution and use itertools.product(*l) instead.

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4  
To spell it out: [''.join(s) for s in itertools.product(*l)] –  Jochen Ritzel Nov 20 '10 at 16:43
    
That's fantacy. –  wong2 Nov 20 '10 at 16:43
    
@wong2 you mean fantastic I hope? Fantasy is quite a bit different :) –  extraneon Nov 20 '10 at 16:58
    
can you explain the * operator? i feel like i never 100% got it –  jon_darkstar Nov 20 '10 at 17:26
1  
@jon_darkstar: It unpacks a sequence into positional arguments. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Nov 20 '10 at 17:27

If anybody's interested in the algorithm, here's a very simple way to use recursion to find the combos:

 l = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b'], ['g', 'h', 'r', 'w']]
 def permu(lists, prefix=''):
      if not lists:
           print prefix
           return
      first = lists[0]
      rest = lists[1:]
      for letter in first:
           permu(rest, prefix + letter)
 permu(l)
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Quite easy with itertools.product :

>>> import itertools
>>> list(itertools.product("abc", "ab", "ghrw"))
[('a', 'a', 'g'), ('a', 'a', 'h'), ('a', 'a', 'r'), ('a', 'a', 'w'), ('a', 'b', 'g'), ('a', 'b', 'h'), ('a', 'b', 'r'), ('a', 'b', 'w'), ('b', 'a', 'g'), ('b', 'a', 'h'), ('b', 'a', 'r'), ('b', 'a', 'w'), ('b', 'b', 'g'), ('b', 'b', 'h'), ('b', 'b', 'r'), ('b', 'b', 'w'), ('c', 'a', 'g'), ('c', 'a', 'h'), ('c', 'a', 'r'), ('c', 'a', 'w'), ('c', 'b', 'g'), ('c', 'b', 'h'), ('c', 'b', 'r'), ('c', 'b', 'w')]
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Here you go

reduce(lambda a,b: [i+j for i in a for j in b], l)

OUT: ['aag', 'aah', 'aar', 'aaw', 'abg', 'abh', 'abr', 'abw', 'bag', 'bah', 'bar', 'baw', 'bbg', 'bbh', 'bbr', 'bbw', 'cag', 'cah', 'car', 'caw', 'cbg', 'cbh', 'cbr', 'cbw']

If you'd like to reuse/regeneralize:

def opOnCombos(a,b, op=operator.add):
    return [op(i,j) for i in a for j in b]

def f(x):
    return lambda a,b: opOnCombo(a,b,x)

reduce(opOnCombos, l) //same as before
reduce(f(operator.mul), l))  //multiply combos of several integer list
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using recursion

def permutenew(l):
if len(l)==1:
    return l[0]
else:   
    lnew=[]
    for a in l[0]:
        for b in permutenew(l[1:]):
            lnew.append(a+b)
    return lnew

l = [['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b'], ['g', 'h', 'r', 'w']]
print permutenew(l)
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