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I'm creating a sort of database, using a list that is read in from the user. When the user enters finish I want the while loop to stop. However, for some reason I need to enter finish TWICE for it to break the loop.

Also, the list is empty after being returned.

def readNames():
nameList = []
count = 0
while count != -1: #infinite loop
    addList = raw_input("Please enter a name: ")
    if addList == 'finish':
        return nameList
        break
    nameList.append(addList)
    print nameList

I'm invoking it and checking if it worked with

readNames()
print readNames()

Also, here is the output

Please enter a name: Dave
['Dave']
Please enter a name: Gavin
['Dave', 'Gavin']
Please enter a name: Paul
['Dave', 'Gavin', 'Paul']
Please enter a name: Test1
['Dave', 'Gavin', 'Paul', 'Test1']
Please enter a name: finish
Please enter a name: finish
[]
>>>
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Works fine for me (in IDLE). Apart from that, there are much easier ways to make an infinite loop (while True: is sufficient; why create a bogus variable + condition? I was actually looking for the count = -1...). Also, the break is unneeded (return exits the function and therefore the loop). –  delnan Nov 20 '10 at 16:46
    
Works fine for me, some notes though: You can simply do while True: for your infinite loop, you also don't need to break after you returned as the break will never be reached. names = readNames() works just fine for me. PS: I've fixed your indentation. –  Ivo Wetzel Nov 20 '10 at 16:47
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you do

readNames()
print readNames()

you run the function twice. On the 2nd run you just enter "finish" and thats why your list remains empty.

What you want to do is this:

def readNames():
    nameList = []
    while True: #infinite loop
        addList = raw_input("Please enter a name: ")
        if addList == 'finish':
            return nameList
        nameList.append(addList)

# store the result, then print it
names = readNames()
print names
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Thanks for the massive help. Been stuck on this for ages. :) –  Hypergiant Nov 20 '10 at 16:58
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Could you not replace

if addList == 'finish':
        return nameList
        break

With

if addList == 'finish':
        return nameList
        count = -1

?

James

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1  
-1 Not only this is still superfluous (see the comments by me and Ivo), it also doesn't answer the question. –  delnan Nov 20 '10 at 16:50
    
Same thing is happening. –  Hypergiant Nov 20 '10 at 16:51
    
Just adding my two cents. Sorry people. –  Bojangles Nov 20 '10 at 21:41
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I think your calling code is accidentally invoking readnames() twice.

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Yes, it appears that is what is happening. After removing print readNames(), it is breaking as expected. –  Hypergiant Nov 20 '10 at 16:53
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Ah, after you posted your code, I can see the issue:

readNames()
print readNames()

You call readNames, read those names from stdin as planned, properly return the read names and then throw the result away because you don't assign it to anything (names = readNames()). Then you call readNames again, and it appears to you as if it didn't exit the loop (it did, but you told it to loop again). You type finish again, and the second invocation of readNames ends without any names entered (nameList is a local variable, so it is lost after the function execution ends), so you get back [].

To fix this, (1) brush up your general programming knowledge ;) and (2) do something like names = readNames(); print names.

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Many thanks for the help, unfortunately THC4k beat you to it. :) –  Hypergiant Nov 20 '10 at 16:59
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