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In the code below, persist() returns w/o an exception but the entity is not stored in the database.

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST)
public String form() {
        EntityManager em = this.emf.createEntityManager();
        TaxRates t = new TaxRates();
        t.setCountry("US");
        // set more properties
        em.persist(t);
        em.close();
        ...
 }

persistence.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<persistence version="2.0" xmlns="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence" xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xsi:schemaLocation="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/persistence/persistence_2_0.xsd">
  <persistence-unit name="TT-SpringMVCPU" transaction-type="RESOURCE_LOCAL">
    <provider>org.eclipse.persistence.jpa.PersistenceProvider</provider>
    ...
    <class>com.sajee.db.TaxRates</class>
    <exclude-unlisted-classes>true</exclude-unlisted-classes>
    <properties>
      <property name="javax.persistence.jdbc.url" value="jdbc:jtds:sqlserver://localhost:1234/mydb"/>
      <property name="javax.persistence.jdbc.password" value="Password1"/>
      <property name="javax.persistence.jdbc.driver" value="net.sourceforge.jtds.jdbc.Driver"/>
      <property name="javax.persistence.jdbc.user" value="sa"/>
    </properties>
  </persistence-unit>
</persistence>

I don't need any transaction support or any fancy enterprise feature support. I simply want to create an entity and save it to the database.

Where am I going wrong?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

persist() doesn't write your object to the database immediately. Instead, it marks your object as persistent, so that it will be written to the database before transaction commit (or before executing a query, or during explicit flush() operation).

So, even if you don't need transactional behaviour you still have to manage transactions. You can do it manually as follows:

@RequestMapping(method = RequestMethod.POST) 
public String form() { 
        EntityManager em = this.emf.createEntityManager(); 
        TaxRates t = new TaxRates(); 
        t.setCountry("US"); 
        // set more properties 
        em.getTransaction().begin();
        em.persist(t); 
        em.getTransaction().commit();
        em.close(); 
        ... 
}

But Spring's declarative transaction support is a more convenient way to do it.

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