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By an "impure virtual function", I mean pure virtual functions that also have implementations (as described at http://www.gotw.ca/gotw/031.htm) for diagnostic purposes.

The kosher way to implement them is to do:

class Foo
{
public:
    ...
    virtual void Bar() = 0;
};

void Foo::Bar() { assert(false); }

But this is kind of tedious, especially for a class has a number of pure virtual methods. Also, it's hard to ensure that someone doesn't accidentally add a new pure virtual function without also adding a corresponding implementation.

Ideally what I'd like to do is:

class Foo
{
public:
    ...
    virtual void Bar() = 0
    {
        assert(false);
    }
};

but the C++ standard explicitly disallows this (section 10.4/2 in the ISO C++ 2003 standard).

As an alternative, I've thought of the following hack. In the Foo.h header:

#ifndef ABSTRACT_METHOD
#define ABSTRACT_METHOD = 0
#endif

class Foo
{
public:
    ...
    virtual void Bar() ABSTRACT_METHOD;
};

and then in the corresponding Foo.cpp source file:

#define ABSTRACT_METHOD { assert(false); }

#include "Foo.h"

...

so that it gets a single compiled implementation.

Would doing so be legal?

share|improve this question
    
Well, you would have a spurious ; in the source file... –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 20 '10 at 20:20
    
@Oli Charlesworth: True, but is there anything inherently wrong with that? That's easily avoidable anyway by moving responsibility for the trailing ; to the macro definition. –  jamesdlin Nov 20 '10 at 20:28
1  
@james: Yes, I believe that would be a compiler error. I know it's trivially fixable, but this was an incidental observation, not a criticism... –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 20 '10 at 20:32
    
I assume you meant to include Foo.h before the macro definition as well to enforce the "pure" portion of the class. Once you do that though, you'll get a class type redefinition error. –  Nick McCowin Nov 20 '10 at 20:43
1  
@Nick McCowin: No. The intent is for the "pure" portion of the class to be enforced only for external consumers of Foo.h. (But also see my reply to Oli Charlesworth's answer below.) –  jamesdlin Nov 20 '10 at 20:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No, it's not legal. The one definition rule says that a class can have multiple definitions in a program (from different translation units), but those definitions must all consist of identical sequences of tokens (3.2/5). ABSTRACT_METHOD is a preprocessing token (prior to macro replacement), but that's not good enough.

So your .cpp file can't validly be used in the same program as another .cpp that includes the header.

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1  
Darn, that's what I was afraid of. Thanks for pointing me to the relevant section of the standard. I suppose that means that __declspec(dllimport) vs. __declspec(dllexport) attributions technically aren't legal from a standards standpoint either. –  jamesdlin Nov 20 '10 at 20:45
1  
@jamesdlin: Technically yes, __declspec is a reserved name, so as far as the standard is concerned a program containing it is not strictly conforming. The program can still be valid in the dialect of C++ defined by Microsoft, though, and if that documentation relaxes the ODR (explicitly or by implication), then you're fine. –  Steve Jessop Nov 20 '10 at 21:05
    
Perhaps a middle ground would be to let ABSTRACT_METHOD be different things in internal development builds (to let the compiler catch incomplete derived classes) but to let it be the stub implementation everywhere else. –  jamesdlin Nov 20 '10 at 22:09
    
@jamesdlin: or do one automated build with it as =0;, solely for the purpose of checking that it compiles, but as the function body in both development and release. If the assert is going to be triggered, you'd probably prefer to trigger it in the build that you're using to develop, to catch it as early as possible and hopefully as close to the bug as possible. –  Steve Jessop Nov 20 '10 at 22:31

I can't answer whether it's valid or not. But if the user of your class declares a derived class in the source file, the compiler won't enforce that Bar() must be implemented in that derived class (because it won't see the = 0). I would imagine that this alone would be a reason not to do it like this.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a fair point. It's not an issue for our codebase since we usually separate classes into separate files. Another approach would be to have a single, separate source impureVirtualStubs.cpp file that defines the implementation version of the macro, includes the various abstract base class headers, and does nothing else. –  jamesdlin Nov 20 '10 at 20:34

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