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I have field

HashMap<String, HashMap> selects = new HashMap<String, HashMap>();

I need for each Hash - create ComboBox, whose items are value HashMap

example. (This is not real and not a working example, I just want to convey the essence)

for(int i=0;i<selects.size();i++)
{
   HashMap h = selects[i].getValue();
   ComboBox cb = new ComboBox();
   for(int y=0;y<h.size();i++)
   {
      cb.items.add(h[y].getValue);
   }
}
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2  
+1 for old geezer speek. –  Tim Apr 18 '12 at 18:42
1  
Cyril N.'s answer is better than the accepted answer. –  Zack Marrapese Mar 5 '13 at 13:48

6 Answers 6

up vote 210 down vote accepted

I know I'm a bit late for that one, but I'll share what I did too, in case it helps someone else :

HashMap<String, HashMap> selects = new HashMap<String, HashMap>();

for(Entry<String, HashMap> entry : selects.entrySet()) {
    String key = entry.getKey();
    HashMap value = entry.getValue();

    // do what you have to do here
    // In your case, an other loop.
}
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21  
This should be the accepted answer. –  prolink007 Feb 6 '13 at 18:46
    
Perfect for when you DO care about keys! –  Eliot Jul 24 '13 at 17:43

Map.values():

HashMap<String, HashMap<SomeInnerKeyType, String>> selects =
    new HashMap<String, HashMap<SomeInnerKeyType, String>>();

...

for(HashMap<SomeInnerKeyType, String> h : selects.values())
{
   ComboBox cb = new ComboBox();
   for(String s : h.values())
   {
      cb.items.add(s);
   }
}
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1  
+1: This is a neater approach than my answer (assuming we're using Java 5 or later) –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 20 '10 at 21:05
    
Use of generic args on the outer HashMap would seem to indicate Java 5 or later. [[ But I did wonder about what Java this was since the inner HashMap didn't have generic args and there was an array access done on a HashMap... but its just some "pseudo" code for conveying the question. ]] –  Bert F Nov 20 '10 at 21:17
    
Bert F,dont work –  Mediator Nov 20 '10 at 21:18
    
Care to explain why it didn't seem to work for you? Are you using Java 5 or later? We're following your code example, which doesn't seem to do anything with the combo box once its created. Or are the values not in the order you want? Or did you need the keys instead of the values in the combo box? I think most would agree that any of the 3 answers so far should work fine, so likely there's a problem with apply the answer or another problem somewhere else that we may be able to help with if you give us more info. –  Bert F Nov 20 '10 at 21:20
    
ooohh...i stupiding =). Only one question how get HashMap<this->String, HashMap<SomeInnerKeyType, String>> –  Mediator Nov 20 '10 at 21:34

You can iterate over a HashMap (and many other collections) using an iterator, e.g.:

HashMap<T,U> map = new HashMap<T,U>();

...

Iterator it = map.values().iterator();

while (it.hasNext()) {
    System.out.println(it.next());
}
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1  
I can not with such a design down to the level below –  Mediator Nov 20 '10 at 21:17
2  
@Yes, you can. You can create an inner iterator based on it.next(). –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 20 '10 at 21:22

I generally do the same as cx42net, but I don't explicitly create an Entry.

HashMap<String, HashMap> selects = new HashMap<String, HashMap>();
for (String key : selects.keySet())
{
    HashMap<innerKey, String> boxHolder = selects.get(key);
    ComboBox cb = new ComboBox();
    for (InnerKey innerKey : boxHolder.keySet())
    {
        cb.items.add(boxHolder.get(innerKey));
    }
}

This just seems the most intuitive to me, I think I'm prejudiced against iterating over the values of a map.

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Lambda Expression

In Java 1.8 this has become lot easier by using forEach method from Iterable Interface.

        hm.forEach((k,v) -> System.out.println("key: "+k+" value:"+v));

Below is the sample code that i tried using Lambda Expression. This stuff is so cool. Must try.

HashMap<Integer,Integer> hm = new HashMap<Integer, Integer>();

    Random rand = new Random(47);

    int i=0;
    while(i<100)
    {
        i++;
        int key = rand.nextInt(20);
        int value = rand.nextInt(50);
        System.out.println("Inserting key: "+key+" Value: "+value);
        Integer imap =hm.put(key,value);
        if( imap == null)
        {
            System.out.println("Inserted");
        }           
        else
        {
            System.out.println("Replaced with "+imap);
        }               
    }

    hm.forEach((k,v) -> System.out.println("key: "+k+" value:"+v));

Also one can use Spliterator also for the same.

Spliterator sit = hm.entrySet().spliterator();
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Use entrySet, see example here:

share|improve this answer
    
icyrock.com, dont work –  Mediator Nov 20 '10 at 21:16
1  
It definitively works, I use it every day :) What exactly doesn't work? As you have HashMap<String, HashMap>, you would need two loops - one for the outer and one for the inner HashMap. Btw - you should definitively type the second HashMap - don't know what you store in it, but something like HashMap<String, HashMap<string, String>> - though, from your example, it seems you should use HashMap<String, Set<String>>. And another thing - use interfaces: Map<String, Map> when you can. –  icyrock.com Nov 20 '10 at 21:27

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