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This might be a bit advanced to explain, as it's a pretty complicated thing I'm trying to do (at least to me).

I'm currently building a movie-database for personal use in PHP and MySQL, and the MySQL part is killing me. The current setup is like this:

I have a main movie database containing names, description and values with a single option (like year, age-limit and media-type (DVD, Blu-Ray, etc).

I have additional tables for language, subtitles, audio-formats etc. which all have two columns. One for the ID of the movie, and one that matches an index (eg. language id). These are supposed to be joined together with the main table, and concatted into a single field.

Example of my language table:

movid | langid
--------------
1     | 2
1     | 4
2     | 4
3     | 5     

Optimally, I would like something like this:

| ID | name    | description | year | subtitles | languages | audio |
--------------------------------------------------------------------
| 1  | One     | Bla bla     | 2010 | 2,3,5,6,7 | 3,6,22,6  | 10,5  |
| 2  | Another | foo bar     | 2008 | 6,33,5,27 | 10,4,2,3  | 8,15  |

With the subtitles and languages being able to be exploded to a PHP array. That part I've actually got working just fine using GROUP_CONCAT, right up 'till the part where I need to search for specific subid's or langid's. This is the query I've been using so far. I hope you'll get the idea even though I havent written out all my table info:

SET SESSION group_concat_max_len = 512;

SELECT
movie.id,
movie.name,
movie.origname,
movie.`year`,
movie.`type`,
movie.duration,
movie.age,
GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT movie_language.langid ORDER BY langid) AS lang,
GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT movie_subtitles.subid ORDER BY subid) AS subtitles

FROM `movie`

LEFT JOIN `movie_audio` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_audio`.`movid` 
LEFT JOIN `movie_company` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_company`.`movid` 
LEFT JOIN `movie_genre` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_genre`.`movid` 
LEFT JOIN `movie_language` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_language`.`movid` 
LEFT JOIN `movie_subtitles` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_subtitles`.`movid` 

GROUP BY movie.id

I use the group_concat_max_len to prevent me getting a BLOB, and so far I have only tried group_concatting two of my joined tables (will add the rest later).

This returns exactly what I want, but I can only have one WHERE clause per joined table or it'll return 0 rows. Again, if I only search for one, it will only return the searched number/id in the GROUP_CONCAT'ted field.

Then I sorta fixed it using the IN() function. At least I thought I did. But the problem is that only works with what I'd call OR-searches. Adding:

WHERE movie_subtitles.subid IN ()

With numbers not in the subtitles table will still return the row, just only with the matching numbers. This is fine for half the searches, but I need a way to search with the AND-like method as well.

I have no idea if I need to restructure completely, or need a totally different query, but I hope for some assistance or hints.

I should perhaps say that I've had a look at the HAVING option as well, but as far as I've understood, it will not be effective on my query.

By the way, if this is impossible to do, I've considered scrapping the joined tables and replacing them with a field easily searchable in the main movie table (like using this "syntax": '#2##4#' and then using LIKE '%#2#%' AND '%#4#%' to match results, or as a last resort using PHP to sort it out (I'd rather die than doing that), though I'd rather like it if above solution could be fixed and used).

Thanks a lot in advance for helping away my headaches!

share|improve this question
    
This actually sounds more like a bug in mysql than an error in your syntax... From what you've explained, it seems like it should work. –  J V Nov 20 '10 at 22:28
    
I would be amazed if that was the truth, but as far as I've understood, all I really need for this exact query to work, is a function "equal" to the IN() one, except to search "AND"-like instead of "OR"-like. –  TNE26 Nov 21 '10 at 20:49
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1 Answer

Sub-query your select then you will have an easier time with your clauses.

Like:

select *
   from (`your big query above`) as t
where subtitles regexp `your ids you want`
and lang regexp `your ids you want`

Well, its not perfect since your ids will have been turned into strings (In postgres you have arrays so you could do a proper search from the top level.) I don't think I would really want search for ids with regular expressions though.

It would be better then, to not concatenate your ids until the final level. So you want 3 levels of queries:

select 
  stuff, ...
  group_concats
from
(
    select *
       from (`your big query above but without the group_concat`) as inner
    conditions ...

) as outer

edit

try this:

SELECT
id,
name,
origname,
`year`,
`type`,
duration,
age,

-- at this point we have the right rows we are just
-- grouping lang and subtitles
GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT langid ORDER BY langid) AS lang,
GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT subid ORDER BY subid) AS subtitles

from
(

    (
        SELECT
            movie.id,
            movie.name,
            movie.origname,
            movie.`year`,
            movie.`type`,
            movie.duration,
            movie.age,
            langid,
            subid


            FROM `movie`

            LEFT JOIN `movie_audio` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_audio`.`movid`
            LEFT JOIN `movie_company` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_company`.`movid`
            LEFT JOIN `movie_genre` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_genre`.`movid`
            LEFT JOIN `movie_language` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_language`.`movid`
            LEFT JOIN `movie_subtitles` ON `movie`.`id`=`movie_subtitles`.`movid`


            -- each row will have a different langid and different subid
            GROUP BY
                movie.id, langid, subid

    ) as inner

    -- you should be able to do any complex condition as this point
    where
        (langid = 1 or langid = 2)
        and (subid = 2 or subid = 3)

) as outer
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply! However, I'm still a bit confused. I get the idea with multiple levels of queries, but not what I'm supposed to do in each of them. As far as I can guess (with the second one), I need to select all cols I need (including the group_concats) in the outer most query, and then do the joining and conditioning in the inner one, right? Or am i completely off track? Please note that I've only messed with basic queries besides this one, so this multilevel stuff is a bit tricky to wrap round my head :) –  TNE26 Nov 21 '10 at 20:45
    
Again, thanks a lot. I get the idea now, but unfortunately MySQL throws me a syntax-error starting at the where clause, however, I don't see any. I did put both inner and outer in proper "quotes", to prevent that from acting up, but I really don't see the problem. –  TNE26 Nov 22 '10 at 6:43
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