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I have the string str

char *str = "100.10b.100.100";

I want to count the occurrences of '.' in str, preferably a one-liner. (If possible no loops)

My approach would be the standard strchr:

  int i = 0;
  char *pch=strchr(str,'.');
  while (pch!=NULL) {
    i++;
    pch=strchr(pch+1,'.');
  }
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3  
To the mantra bag - what have you tried? what about it doesn't work? ....... –  KevinDTimm Nov 20 '10 at 23:14
    
@KevinDTimm: I posted my approach. –  Mike Nov 20 '10 at 23:15
1  
As tvanfosson pointed out, you can do it with recursion, and perhaps that's what your teacher wanted to see you do, but it's an utterly idiotic way to do it. It will result in stack overflow for large enough strings... and not the good kind of SO that does your homework for you, the bad kind! ;-) –  R.. Nov 21 '10 at 1:00
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9 Answers

Here's the way I'd do it (minimal number of variables needed):

for (i=0; s[i]; s[i]=='.' ? i++ : *s++);
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1  
This is one good answer,+1 –  Fahad Uddin Nov 21 '10 at 7:20
    
No, I'm incrementing either s or i depending on whether s[i] is a '.' or not. The expression s+i always increases by exactly 1 at each iteration, but it could be the counter (i) or the base pointer (s) that causes s+i to increase. –  R.. Nov 21 '10 at 14:15
    
Oops, looks like the comment I was replying to got deleted.. –  R.. Nov 21 '10 at 14:15
4  
I would call that clever. In code, clever is not always a good thing. I usually prefer obvious. –  tvanfosson Nov 21 '10 at 14:17
1  
If you're already incrementing s, why not use i entirely for counting occurences of '.'? for (; *s; i += *s == '.', s++) –  Jake Nov 29 '13 at 1:16
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Look, ma, no loops.

int c = countChars( s, '.' );

int countChars( char* s, char c )
{
    return *s == '\0'
              ? 0
              : countChars( s + 1, c ) + (*s == c);
}

But, I'd actually use a loop, since that's the correct control structure to use.

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ah, sweetness and light :) - but can't you do a ternary so there's only one return (and no if)? –  KevinDTimm Nov 20 '10 at 23:19
1  
I think the | is supposed to be a :. Also, "no loops" is nice, but it's not exactly as readable nor maintainable as a loop, and it's not going to be faster either. (Though it may not be slower, thanks to tail recursion.) Clever code is not always good code, especially when it obfuscates meaning. –  cdhowie Nov 20 '10 at 23:20
    
@Kevin - yes, but it would be less readable, IMO. –  tvanfosson Nov 20 '10 at 23:20
    
@cdhowie -- blame my glasses. I've fixed it. –  tvanfosson Nov 20 '10 at 23:21
1  
You need *s==c in parentheses. + has higher precedence than ==, obviously. –  R.. Nov 21 '10 at 14:17
show 17 more comments

I'd still throw this in a function, parametrizing the source string and the character to search for.

int count_characters(const char *str, char character)
{
    const char *p = str;
    int count = 0;

    do {
        if (*p == character)
            count++;
    } while (*(p++));

    return count;
}
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OK, a non-loop implementation (and yes, it is meant as a joke).

size_t CountChars(const char *s, char c)
{
  size_t nCount=0;
  if (s[0])
  {
    nCount += ( s[0]==c);
    if (s[1])
    {
      nCount += ( s[1]==c);
      if (s[2])
      {
        nCount += ( s[2]==c);
        if (s[3])
        {
          nCount += ( s[3]==c);
          if (s[4])
          {
            nCount += ( s[4]==c);
            if (s[5])
            {
              nCount += ( s[5]==c);
              if (s[6])
              {
                nCount += ( s[6]==c);
                if (s[7])
                {
                  nCount += ( s[7]==c);
                  if (s[8])
                  {
                    nCount += ( s[8]==c);
                    if (s[9])
                    {
                      nCount += ( s[9]==c);
                      if (s[10])
                      {
                        /* too long */
                        assert(0);
                      }
                    }
                  }
                }
              }
            }
          }
        }
      }
    }
  }
  return nCount;
}
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2  
I think you've doubled your 8 here: nCount += ( s[88]==c);. You should have written a C code generator that called cc via system to produce the final result. Or even better, a recursive code generator to avoid loops in the code generator. –  mu is too short Nov 21 '10 at 0:20
    
+1 for cleverness! –  Alex Reynolds Nov 21 '10 at 3:36
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Without loops is going to be hard since there's no standard C library function that does this and you need to look at all chars :)

I'll take the obvious solution:

int i, count;
for (i=0, count=0; str[i]; i++)
  count += (str[i] == '.');

Feel free to squeeze the two lines of actual code into one if you have to :)

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for (i=0; s[i]; s[i]=='.' ? i++ : s++); –  R.. Nov 21 '10 at 1:01
    
That modifies s, though. I've tried to leave the original values alone :) Other than that, nice! –  Fabian Giesen Nov 21 '10 at 1:26
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If you're keen on a one-liner (well, two-):

size_t count = 0;
while(*str) if (*str++ == '.') ++count;
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Here's it reduced to a single for statement including the loop variable and output: for (size_t i=0; s[i] || printf("%d\n", i)>INT_MAX; s[i]=='.'?i++:s++); ;-) –  R.. Nov 21 '10 at 1:05
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I dont like goto,still,

    int i=0,count=0;
    char *str = "100.10b.100.100";
    a:
    if(str[i]=='.')
        count++;
    i++;
    if(str[i])
    goto a;
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Clearly, a loop –  KevinDTimm Nov 21 '10 at 14:20
    
and where is the loop : P? –  Fahad Uddin Nov 21 '10 at 19:10
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The only way to do it without a loop is recursion. The following is included for fun, but is NOT recommended as a solution:

size_t CountChars(char* s, char c)
{
    return *s ? ((c==*s) + CountChars(s+1)) : 0;
}
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everytime you run this code baby dijkstra cries :)

  1
  2
  3
  4 #include <ctype.h>
  5 #include <stdio.h>
  6 #include <stdlib.h>
  7 #include <string.h>
  8
  9
 10 size_t bytewise_pop_count(
 11     unsigned char * bp, size_t l
 12 ) {
 13     if ( (bp) && (l) ) {
 14         return bytewise_pop_count(bp+1, l-1) + (bp[0] ? 1 : 0);
 15     }
 16     return 0;
 17 }
 18
 19 void mercilessly_complement_bytes(
 20     unsigned char * bp, size_t l
 21 ) {
 22 /*
 23     transform
 24         0 -> 1
 25         !0 -> 0
 26 */
 27     if ( (bp) && (l) ) {
 28         bp[0] = bp[0] ? 0 : 1;
 29         mercilessly_complement_bytes(bp+1, l-1);
 30     }
 31 }
 32
 33 void xor_bytes(
 34     unsigned char * bp1, unsigned char * bp2, size_t l
 35 ) {
 36     /* stores result in bp2 */
 37     if ( (bp1) && (bp2) && (l) ) {
 38         bp2[0] ^= bp1[0];
 39         xor_bytes(bp1+1, bp2+1, l-1);
 40     }
 41 }
 42
 43
 44 int main(int argc, char * * argv) {
 45     char c;
 46     size_t count;
 47     size_t l;
 48     char * string;
 49     char * t;
 50
 51     if (argc < 3) {
 52         fprintf(stderr,
 53             "\n"
 54             "==> not enough arguments -- need char and string\n"
 55             "\n"
 56         );
 57         return EXIT_FAILURE;
 58     }
 59
 60     c = argv[1][0];
 61     string = argv[2];
 62
 63     if ( l = strlen(string) ) {
 64         t = malloc(l);
 65         memset(t, c, l);
 66         xor_bytes(string, t, l);
 67         mercilessly_complement_bytes(t, l);
 68         count = bytewise_pop_count(t, l);
 69         free(t);
 70     } else {
 71         count = 0;
 72     }
 73
 74     if ( isprint(c) ) {
 75         printf(
 76             "\n"
 77             "==> occurences of char ``%c'' in string ``%s'': %zu\n"
 78             "\n"
 79             , c, string ? string : "<NULL>", count
 80         );
 81     } else {
 82         printf(
 83             "\n"
 84             "==> occurences of char ``%hhu'' in string ``%s'': %zu\n"
 85             "\n"
 86             , c, string ? string : "<NULL>", count
 87         );
 88     }
 89     return EXIT_SUCCESS;
 90 }
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Not quite the one line (if possible no loops) asked for! –  Andrew Oct 28 '12 at 6:07
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