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Can you convert

-- tupleUnfold :: forall a. ((forall b. a -> b)) -> a -> ((b))
tupleUnfold :: Int -> ExpQ
tupleUnfold n = do
  xs <- forM [1 .. n] (const . newName $ "x")
  y <- newName "y"
  let y' = varE y
      g (ps', es') x = (varP x : ps', appE (varE x) y' : es')
      (ps, es) = foldl' g ([], []) xs
  lamE [tupP ps, varP y] (tupE es)

to pointfree style while maintaining clarity (I know of the program 'pointfree', but would prefer not to obfuscate the code even more)?

Either way, what changes could be made to improve the style of the function, or otherwise makes its intent clearer? The function is intended to be used as below.

$(tupleUnfold 3) ((+ 1), (+ 2), (+ 3)) 2
-- (3, 4, 5)

What are some better naming conventions to use (see the ps, ps', es, and es' variables)?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's what I got. Needs Control.Arrow (&&&) and Control.Applicative (<$>).

tupleUnfold :: Int -> ExpQ
tupleUnfold n = do
    y <- newName "y"
    (ps,es) <- unzip . map (varP &&& (`appE` varE y) . varE) 
                <$> replicateM n (newName "x")
    lamE [tupP ps, varP y] (tupE es)

Couldn't whittle at it much more without making it totally incomprehensible.

EDIT While not point free, here is the clearest I could make it. Needs Data.Function (on)

tupleUnfold :: Int -> ExpQ
tupleUnfold n = do
    y <- newName "y"
    xs <- replicateM n (newName "x")
    let exps = tupE $ zipWith appVars xs (repeat y)
        pats = tupP $ map varP xs
    lamE [pats, varP y] exps
  where
    appVars = appE `on` varE
share|improve this answer
    
I like the use of "replicateM" - not sure how I missed that one –  ScootyPuff Nov 21 '10 at 2:59
    
I am marking this one as the correct answer somewhat arbitrarily. Though the other one is pointfree at the top-level, this one appears to represent the flow and transformation better - though it is slightly more difficult to read. –  ScootyPuff Nov 21 '10 at 3:09
    
Part of the reason for the fold (instead of map) was to avoid multiple traversals. I also know that GHC is rather good at fusing list traversals. Is it usually a significant difference? Given that both forms are relatively easy to write, which should (as a rule of thumb) be preferred? –  ScootyPuff Nov 21 '10 at 3:12
    
For efficiency, if you can't get away with meaningful sharing of computation, linearity (using each argument exactly once) is usually what you should strive for. So I guess the fold. But um, this is TH code, which executes at compile time on sizes that are tuples, i.e. less than 62 and more likely... 3. This isn't exactly a bottleneck. –  luqui Nov 21 '10 at 4:11
    
I guess I mean as a general rule. –  ScootyPuff Nov 22 '10 at 15:23

a little more incomprehensible (try to read from right to left):

tupleUnfold n = do
  y <- newName "y"
  uncurry lamE . ((:[varP y]) . tupP *** tupE) . unzip .   
   map (varP &&& (`appE` varE y) . varE) <$> replicateM n (newName "x")

EDIT:
mix of arrows and function composition for processing

tupleUnfold n = do
  y <- newName "y"
  uncurry lamE . ((tupP >>> (:[varP y])) *** tupE) . unzip .
    map (varP &&& (varE >>> (`appE` varE y))) <$> replicateM n (newName "x")

and using mostly arrows (read processing function from left to right)

tupleUnfold n = do
  y <- newName "y"
  (map (varP &&& (varE >>> (`appE` varE y))) >>> unzip >>>
    ((tupP >>> (:[varP y])) *** tupE) >>> uncurry lamE) <$> replicateM n (newName "x")

note that the arrow function (>>>) is equivalent to flip (.)

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Personally I think it's pretty clear already, but how about this:

tupleUnfold :: Int -> ExpQ
tupleUnfold = mapM (const . newName $ "x") . enumFromTo 1 >=> \xs -> do
    y <- newName "y"
    let y' = varE y
        g (ps', es') x = (varP x : ps', appE (varE x) y' : es')
        f ps = lamE [tupP ps, varP y] . tupE
    uncurry f $ foldl' g ([],[]) xs

The Kleisli composition operator >=> (from Control.Monad) is useful for creating pointfree monadic functions.

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I had a version that was at the top-level pointfree (using >=>), but eventually had to break it down. Its good to know that it is relatively clear as it is - most of what gets me about Haskell is how many ways something could be rewritten. –  ScootyPuff Nov 21 '10 at 3:02
    
How important are let bindings when it comes to performance? That is mostly why I have y' - I was uncertain if the expression would be pulled to an outer scope. –  ScootyPuff Nov 21 '10 at 3:06
    
Yeah without the y' the varE y computation would not be shared. But that computation probably just delegates to a constructor, so it is irrelevant (and don't go worrying about two calls to a constructor vs. one, that's just letting your language own you -- you won't get faster code, you'll just get crappy code). The prime in foldl' is useless because it's a normal (lazy) tuple. Use a strict tuple data Tuple a b = Tuple !a !b. But since this is stream-like code, use foldr instead -- it uses asymptotically less memory. This basically amounts to unzip . map as in my response. –  luqui Nov 21 '10 at 4:21
2  
But again, this is not the place to optimize. Make your Haskell beautiful. Then it will speak to you, and pretty soon you realize your codebase has shrunk by 75%. Performance isn't everything. –  luqui Nov 21 '10 at 4:23

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