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Trying to emulate the rollover of a 24 hour clock by hand (with math vs. using the timespan classes). The incrementing part was easy to figure out how to roll over from 23:00 to 0:00 and from, but getting it to go the other way is turning out to be really confusing. Here's what I have so far:

static void IncrementMinute(int min, int incr)
{
    int newMin = min + incr,
                hourIncrement = newMin / 60;

    //increment or decrement the hour
    if((double)newMin % 60 < 0 && (double)newMin % 60 > -1)
        hourIncrement = -1;

    Console.WriteLine("Hour increment is {0}: ", hourIncrement);
}

The problem that im finding is when going backwards, if the the modulus of is between numbers, it will not decrement correctly. Example: it is 12:00 and you subtract 61 minutes, we know the time would be 10:59 as the hour should roll back 1 hour for going from 12:00 to 11:59, then back again for going from 11:00 to 10:59. Unfortunately the way im calculating it: newMin % 60 in this case, only grabs the first hour rollback, but since the second rollback is technically -1.0166 as a remainder, and since mod only returns a whole number, its rounding off. Im sure im missing some basic math here, but could someone help me out?

EDIT: I've written this a number of ways long and short. Some are closer than others, but I know this is simpler than it seems. I know this one seems kinda "wtf was he doing", but you should be able to see basically what Im trying to do. Incrementing a clock and having it rollover from 23:59 to 0:00 is easy. Going backwards has proven to be not so easy.

OK, here's the incrementMinute with the rollover. Simple. But try to go backwards. Doesn't work.

static void IncrementMinute(int min, int incr)

        {
            int newMin = min + incr,
                hourIncrement = newMin / 60;

            min = newMin % 60;

            Console.WriteLine("The new minute is {0} and the hour has incremented by {1}", min, hourIncrement);
        }
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1  
Could you add a little bit more details to this, in particular a usage example and expected state of the global variable? –  steinar Nov 21 '10 at 0:33
    
What values do min and incr have? –  ChrisF Nov 21 '10 at 0:36
    
I believe i did give those examples. Basically, how do i code the decrement to have 12:00 - 0:61 = 10:59 and have it work for increments as well. –  Sinaesthetic Nov 21 '10 at 0:36
    
What's with the comma after incr in 3rd line? –  gligoran Nov 21 '10 at 0:37
    
What about just simple addition/subtraction; Worked for my clock. –  anon271334 Nov 21 '10 at 0:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd go for something a bit simpler

public class Clock
{
    public const int HourPerDay = 24;
    public const int MinutesPerHour = 60;
    public const int MinutesPerDay = MinutesPerHour * HourPerDay;

    private int totalMinutes;

    public int Minute
    {
        get { return this.totalMinutes % MinutesPerHour; }
    }

    public int Hour
    {
        get { return this.totalMinutes / MinutesPerHour; }
    }

    public void AddMinutes(int minutes)
    {
        this.totalMinutes += minutes;
        this.totalMinutes %= MinutesPerDay;
        if (this.totalMinutes < 0)
            this.totalMinutes += MinutesPerDay;
    }

    public void AddHours(int hours)
    {
        this.AddMinutes(hours * MinutesPerHour);
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("{0:00}:{1:00}", this.Hour, this.Minute);
    }
}

Sample usage :

new Clock().AddMinutes(-1);    // 23:59
new Clock().AddMinutes(-61);   // 22:59
new Clock().AddMinutes(-1441); // 23:59
new Clock().AddMinutes(1);     // 00:01
new Clock().AddMinutes(61);    // 01:01
new Clock().AddMinutes(1441);  // 00:01
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In your AddMinutes function: s/if/while/, in case the user adds more than one day's worth of negative minutes. –  jtdubs Nov 22 '10 at 1:43
    
@jtdubs, this.totalMinutes %= MinutesPerDay; takes care of that ;) –  Diadistis Nov 22 '10 at 9:37
    
@Sinaesthetic, if you're going to use this class, keep in mind that it's not thread safe. –  Diadistis Nov 22 '10 at 10:02

You might try calculating both minute and hour increments first, then handling cases where the new minutes crosses an hour boundary, something like this:

int hourIncrement = incr / 60;
int minIncrement = incr % 60;

int newMin = min + minIncrement;

if (newMin < 0)
{
    newMin += 60;
    hourIncrement--;
}
else if (newMin > 60)
{
    newMin -= 60;
    hourIncrement++;
}

Edit

I like @Ben Voigts answer, but was wondering if there would be any difference in performance. I ran the console application below to time them both, and was a little surprised by the results.

  • 40 ms for the code above
  • 2876 ms for Ben's answer

This was done in a release build. Can anyone else run this and confirm? Am I making any mistakes in the way I time them?

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

            int max = 100000000;

            sw.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < max; i++)
                IncrementMinute1(0, -61);
            sw.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine("IncrementMinute1: {0} ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

            sw.Reset();

            sw.Start();
            for (int i = 0; i < max; i++)
                IncrementMinute2(0, -61);
            sw.Stop();

            Console.WriteLine("IncrementMinute2: {0} ms", sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

            Console.ReadLine();
        }

        static void IncrementMinute1(int min, int incr)
        {
            int hourIncrement = incr / 60;
            int minIncrement = incr % 60;

            int newMin = min + minIncrement;

            if (newMin < 0)
            {
                newMin += 60;
                hourIncrement--;
            }
            else if (newMin > 60)
            {
                newMin -= 60;
                hourIncrement++;
            }
        }

        static void IncrementMinute2(int min, int incr)
        {
            min += incr;
            int hourIncrement = (int)Math.Floor(min / 60.0);
            min -= hourIncrement * 60;
        }
    }
}
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at first glance, this wouldnt work if you went more than one hour backwards. This is kind of where i was at about an hour ago :( –  Sinaesthetic Nov 21 '10 at 0:57
    
@Sinaesthetic, maybe I'm misunderstanding, but if I start with min == 0 and incr = -121, I get newMin == 59, and hourIncrement == -3. Is that incorrect? –  Jeff Ogata Nov 21 '10 at 1:06
    
@adrift: It looks to me like it should work, but it's more complicated than necessary. –  Ben Voigt Nov 21 '10 at 1:16
    
AH! i missed part of this, this seems to work correctly! Standby... –  Sinaesthetic Nov 21 '10 at 1:25
    
for max = 1000000 : IncrementMinute1: 1345 ms, IncrementMinute2: 1767 ms –  Diadistis Nov 21 '10 at 5:04

Modular mathematics is only defined for the integers. If you are attempting to mix modular arithmetic with real numbers you will not succeed. You need to figure out a different mathematical approach.

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the real number casting was just to enter the control structure. I was trying to make sure that it would subtract at least 1 hour, but I found out that it would cause problems with next decrement if it was less than 1 full hour. confusing... –  Sinaesthetic Nov 21 '10 at 0:43
    
yes, but conceptually you want that remainder. It isn't going to happen using modular arithmetic unless you separate the hours and minutes before applying modulus. –  Jeremy Petzold Nov 21 '10 at 0:55
    
the hours and minutes are separated before applying the modulus. –  Sinaesthetic Nov 21 '10 at 1:00

Try

        int newMin = min + incr,
            hourIncrement = (int)Math.Floor(newMin / 60.0);

        min -= hourIncrement * 60;

The essential problem was that you want hourIncrement to round down, but integer division rounds toward zero. They're the same with positive numbers, but not for negative...

EDIT (getting rid of useless extra variable):

    min += incr;
    int hourIncrement = (int)Math.Floor(min / 60.0);
    min -= hourIncrement * 60;

EDIT2 (avoid floating-point arithmetic):

    min += incr;
    int hourIncrement = min / 60;
    min -= hourIncrement * 60;
    if (min < 0) { min += 60; --hourIncrement; }
share|improve this answer
    
ok Math.Floor is what I was looking for. Doesn't solve the minute rollback, but it got the part that i was struggling on the most. I THINK i can get it from here thanks. –  Sinaesthetic Nov 21 '10 at 1:06
    
I provided code to take care of the minute rollback, but got mixed up by the fact you weren't actually putting the new minute in newMin. See ideone.com/i3Yom –  Ben Voigt Nov 21 '10 at 1:13

Why to complicate things

public System.Timers.Timer timer = new System.Timers.Timer(1000);
public DateTime d;

public void init()
{
timer.Elapsed += new System.Timers.ElapsedEventHandler(timer_Elapsed);

d = new DateTime(2011, 11, 11, 23, 59, 50);
d=d.AddHours(1);
Console.Writeline(d);
d=d.AddHours(-2);
Console.Writeline(d);
timer.Enabled = true;
}
   void timer_Elapsed(object sender, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        this.Dispatcher.Invoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, (Action)(() =>
        {
            MoveClockHands();
            d=d.AddSeconds(1);
            Console.WriteLine(d);

        }));
    }

    void MoveClockHands()  //12 hours clock
    (
       s=d.Second * 6;
       m=d.Minute * 6;
       h=0.5 * ((d.Hour % 12) * 60 + d.Minute)
    }
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