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So, I've recently been working on simplifying a ruby method that I didn't write. It's part of a legacy project that a coworker wrote. In general, we have done a pretty good job not accumulating code debt, but there are a few methods that need some love.

So, this method that I've been simplifying was originally a giant heaping mass of nested if-else blocks. This is not good in any language and makes it incredibly hard to understand what the method is supposed to do. I've determined what the method does and simplified the method so there are no longer nasty nested if's.

Now I want to simplify it even more, if possible, I want to eliminate all but one return statement. The method is longer than this, but below is the general concept of what it looks like right now:

  def return_bool
    return false unless condition1 && condition2
    @var = SomeClass.getter(foo)
    return true unless var.someProperty != 0
    @stuff = @var.getsomething id
    return false unless @stuff && somethingElse
    data = JSON.parse(@stuff)
    @stuff.each do |stuff|
      return false if data[stuff['something']] != stuff['anotherSomething']
    end
    return true
  end

I've thought about using raise and exception handling to reduce return statements, but if, for example, condition1 is false, it's not an exceptional situation, I expect it at certain times.

So, my question is, how can I reduce the number of return statements in the above method? Preferably down to one? And in reality, if I could get it down to one, I wouldn't explicitly return, because the value of the last statement in a method is what is returned. I actually prefer to implicitly return if I can.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
raise is never better, than return – Nakilon Nov 21 '10 at 3:05
    
That actually does something useful? – the Tin Man Nov 21 '10 at 3:20
    
@Greg Yes. Like I mentioned, it's a bigger method but I just wanted to post a small code sample so you get the gist of it. – Alex Nov 21 '10 at 3:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The sample code isn't from something that works because Ruby would refuse to execute that method definition.

This is how I would unravel it, but without sample values for any of the local variables or the definition of SomeClass there's no way to test it.

def return_bool
  if (condition1 && condition2)
    @var = SomeClass.getter(foo)
    if (var.someProperty == 0)
      @stuff = @var.getsomething id
      if (! (@stuff && somethingElse))
        data = JSON.parse(@stuff)
        @stuff.each do |stuff|
          return false if data[stuff['something']] != stuff['anotherSomething']
        end
      end
    end
  end
  return true
end
share|improve this answer
    
This gives me some ideas to work off of. Thanks! +1 and accepted. – Alex Nov 21 '10 at 3:37
    
The #1 thing I saw in the original code is the horrid reliance on unless. It's equivalent to if (!some_boolean_value) but makes our brain work overtime decoding what is happening. By changing the statements using unless to if (!...) it looked like nested if statements would be close to the same logic. – the Tin Man Nov 21 '10 at 3:47

Use ExtractMethod to cut the method up in smaller logical parts. Your tests should help you make sure you don't break anything. http://www.refactoring.com/catalog/extractMethod.html

  def return_bool
    some_condition? &&
       var_is_valid? &&
       stuff_is_valid? &&
       parsed_stuff_has_something?
  end

  def get_var
    @var = SomeClass.getter(foo)
  end

  def get_stuff
    @stuff = @var.getsomething id
  end

  def some_condition?
    condition1 && condition2
  end

  def var_is_valid?
    get_var.someProperty == 0
  end

  def stuff_is_valid?
    get_stuff && somethingElse
  end

  def parsed_stuff_has_something?
    data = JSON.parse(@stuff)
    @stuff.each do |stuff|
      return false if data[stuff['something']] != stuff['anotherSomething']
    end
    true
  end
share|improve this answer

Use .all? instead of last .each loop:

def return_bool
  return false unless condition1 && condition2
  @var = SomeClass.getter foo
  return true unless var.someProperty != 0
  @stuff = @var.getsomething id
  return false unless somethingElse && @stuff
  data = JSON.parse @stuff
  @stuff.all? do |stuff|
    data[stuff['something']] == stuff['anotherSomething']
  end
end

By the way, returns vs ifs is like a holywar. I prefer returns.
Also, if you don't like returns, what about this?

def return_bool
  condition1 && condition2 && (
    @var = SomeClass.getter foo
    var.someProperty.zero? || (
      (@stuff = @var.getsomething id) && somethingElse && (
        data = JSON.parse @stuff
        @stuff.all? do |stuff|
          data[stuff['something']] == stuff['anotherSomething']
        end ) ) )
end
share|improve this answer
    
I have to think about this a bit, but if somethingElse is falsy, then @stuff = ... never gets evaluated, whereas in the original version the assignment does happen. – Jörg W Mittag Nov 21 '10 at 3:16
    
BTW: that double negation looks a bit nasty, how about return true if var.someProperty.zero? – Jörg W Mittag Nov 21 '10 at 3:17
    
@Jörg W Mittag, I agree with you on both comments. I must rewrite... – Nakilon Nov 21 '10 at 3:44

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