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While checking Mutex unlock codes around, I found some that add 1 into the mutex variable instead of setting it to "1" directly. Is there any pros/cons of this?

Thanks

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Are you asking about the pros/cons of using a mutex vs semaphore? –  Gerrat Nov 21 '10 at 5:27
    
...or do you just want to know why you might increment a mutex value vs setting a value to "1" (if the language gave you that option)? –  Gerrat Nov 21 '10 at 5:28
    
No. I know they are totally different. What I mean is if I look at some low level Assembly for a Mutex, I find some implementations for "Unlock" doing "add 1,lockregisterhere" instead of saying something like "movi 1,lockregisterhere".. so what are possible pros/cons for this on a multi-core machine if it is used in a multi-threaded application? Say something as in Barriers for the threads –  johnshaddad Nov 21 '10 at 5:29
    
Yes, I just want to know the pros/cons of incrementing the value vs. setting it to "1" –  johnshaddad Nov 21 '10 at 5:29

2 Answers 2

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I wonder if it is possible that you are refereeing to the difference between mutex and semaphore resource access control.


Edit

That's all about CPU cycles needed for those two OPs. To my knowledge add uses less CPU cycles than mov. But then again it is very arch-dependent and questionable. Also, bear in mind that assemblers choice of how to encode a higher-level language instruction is very dependent on the surrounding instructions

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No. I know what both mean. Please see my comments on my question for a clarification of what I mean. –  johnshaddad Nov 21 '10 at 5:35
    
Yup, I saw that later on. I guess it depends on the CPU architecture - some run ADD pretty fast because of the flag-setting dependecies and such while INC takes less space... what CPU did you test it on? –  Vuk Nov 21 '10 at 5:44
    
x86 Intel Quad Core –  johnshaddad Nov 21 '10 at 5:49
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The Intel manual for the newer CPU series (which I guess you have) says: "Assembly/Compiler Coding Rule - INC/DEC instructions should be replaced with ADD/SUB, because ADD/SUB overwrite all flags, whereas INC/DEC instructions do not, therefore creating false dependencies on earlier instructions that set the flags previously." It's not an entire quite, but it's pretty close to that. –  Vuk Nov 21 '10 at 5:57
2  
That's all about CPU cycles needed for those two OPs. To my knowledge add uses less CPU cycles that mov. But then again it is very arch-dependent and questionable. Also, bear in mind that assemblers choice of how to encode a higher-level language instruction is very dependent on the surrounding instructions. –  Vuk Nov 21 '10 at 6:17

It's just important that whatever operation is used, that it is atomic. It makes most sense to me to doing a set, rather than an add, particularly if there's a test-and-set instruction or implementation.

I found this implementation of a TestAndSet function for the x86 architecture. Here it uses a set (mov) instruction but it could have also used add or inc to do this but it would require eax to be 0 with the xchg instruction being used for atomicity. I suppose that requiring eax to be zero could be a con.

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