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I have a multithreaded WPF application that is using > 600 threads after is has been running for more than 8 hours. All but approximately 10 of these threads have a stack trace that is very similar to this:

Stack trace 1:

ntkrnlpa.exe!NtInitialUserProcessBuffer+0x7b ntkrnlpa.exe!MiAddWorkingSetPage+0x174 ntkrnlpa.exe!MiAddWsleHash+0x12a ntkrnlpa.exe!PopSystemButtonHandler+0x141 ntkrnlpa.exe!KiInterruptTemplate+0x62 ntdll.dll!KiFastSystemCallRet ntdll.dll!ZwWaitForMultipleObjects+0xc KERNEL32.dll!WaitForMultipleObjectsEx+0x12c mscorwks.dll!WaitForMultipleObjectsEx_SO_TOLERANT+0x6f mscorwks.dll!Thread::DoAppropriateAptStateWait+0x3c mscorwks.dll!Thread::DoAppropriateWaitWorker+0x13c mscorwks.dll!Thread::DoAppropriateWait+0x40 mscorwks.dll!WaitHandleNative::CorWaitOneNative+0x156 mscorlib.ni.dll+0x1f68af mscorlib.ni.dll+0x1caa17 WindowsBase.ni.dll+0x24ac34 WindowsBase.ni.dll+0x2aeb1e WindowsBase.ni.dll+0x9445d WindowsBase.ni.dll+0x9267f mscorwks.dll!JITutil_IsInstanceOfAny+0x106 mscorlib.ni.dll+0x1e842f mscorwks.dll!CallDescrWorker+0x33 mscorwks.dll!CallDescrWorkerWithHandler+0xa3 mscorwks.dll!MethodDesc::CallDescr+0x19c mscorwks.dll!MethodDesc::CallTargetWorker+0x1f mscorwks.dll!MethodDescCallSite::Call+0x1a mscorwks.dll!ExecuteCodeWithGuaranteedCleanupHelper+0x9f mscorwks.dll!ReflectionInvocation::ExecuteCodeWithGuaranteedCleanup+0x10f mscorlib.ni.dll+0x235677 mscorlib.ni.dll+0x2202a5 mscorlib.ni.dll+0x1e839b mscorwks.dll!CallDescrWorker+0x33 mscorwks.dll!CallDescrWorkerWithHandler+0xa3 mscorwks.dll!DispatchCallBody+0x1e mscorwks.dll!DispatchCallDebuggerWrapper+0x3d mscorwks.dll!DispatchCallNoEH+0x51 mscorwks.dll!AddTimerCallback_Worker+0x66 mscorwks.dll!Thread::DoADCallBack+0x32a mscorwks.dll!Thread::ShouldChangeAbortToUnload+0xe3 mscorwks.dll!Thread::ShouldChangeAbortToUnload+0x30a mscorwks.dll!Thread::ShouldChangeAbortToUnload+0x33e mscorwks.dll!ManagedThreadBase::ThreadPool+0x13 mscorwks.dll!AddTimerCallbackEx+0x83 mscorwks.dll!AddTimerCallback+0x10 mscorwks.dll!ThreadpoolMgr::AsyncTimerCallbackCompletion+0x64 mscorwks.dll!UnManagedPerAppDomainTPCount::DispatchWorkItem+0x9a mscorwks.dll!ThreadpoolMgr::ExecuteWorkRequest+0xaf mscorwks.dll!ThreadpoolMgr::WorkerThreadStart+0x20b mscorwks.dll!Thread::intermediateThreadProc+0x49 KERNEL32.dll!BaseThreadStart+0x37

Stack Trace 2:

ntkrnlpa.exe!NtInitialUserProcessBuffer+0x7b ntkrnlpa.exe!MiAddWorkingSetPage+0x174 ntkrnlpa.exe!MiAddWsleHash+0x12a ntkrnlpa.exe!PopSystemButtonHandler+0x141 ntkrnlpa.exe!KiInterruptTemplate+0x62 ntdll.dll!KiFastSystemCallRet ntdll.dll!ZwWaitForMultipleObjects+0xc KERNEL32.dll!WaitForMultipleObjectsEx+0x12c mscorwks.dll!WaitForMultipleObjectsEx_SO_TOLERANT+0x6f mscorwks.dll!Thread::DoAppropriateAptStateWait+0x3c mscorwks.dll!Thread::DoAppropriateWaitWorker+0x13c mscorwks.dll!Thread::DoAppropriateWait+0x40 mscorwks.dll!WaitHandleNative::CorWaitOneNative+0x156 mscorlib.ni.dll+0x1f68af mscorlib.ni.dll+0x1caa17 WindowsBase.ni.dll+0x24ac34 WindowsBase.ni.dll+0x2aeb1e WindowsBase.ni.dll+0x9445d WindowsBase.ni.dll+0x9267f mscorwks.dll!JITutil_IsInstanceOfAny+0x106 mscorlib.ni.dll+0x1e842f mscorwks.dll!CallDescrWorker+0x33 mscorwks.dll!CallDescrWorkerWithHandler+0xa3 mscorwks.dll!MethodDesc::CallDescr+0x19c mscorwks.dll!MethodDesc::CallTargetWorker+0x1f mscorwks.dll!MethodDescCallSite::Call+0x1a mscorwks.dll!ExecuteCodeWithGuaranteedCleanupHelper+0x9f mscorwks.dll!ReflectionInvocation::ExecuteCodeWithGuaranteedCleanup+0x10f mscorlib.ni.dll+0x235677 mscorlib.ni.dll+0x2202a5 mscorlib.ni.dll+0x1e839b mscorwks.dll!CallDescrWorker+0x33 mscorwks.dll!CallDescrWorkerWithHandler+0xa3 mscorwks.dll!DispatchCallBody+0x1e mscorwks.dll!DispatchCallDebuggerWrapper+0x3d mscorwks.dll!DispatchCallNoEH+0x51 mscorwks.dll!AddTimerCallback_Worker+0x66 mscorwks.dll!Thread::DoADCallBack+0x32a mscorwks.dll!Thread::ShouldChangeAbortToUnload+0xe3 mscorwks.dll!Thread::ShouldChangeAbortToUnload+0x30a mscorwks.dll!Thread::ShouldChangeAbortToUnload+0x33e mscorwks.dll!ManagedThreadBase::ThreadPool+0x13 mscorwks.dll!AddTimerCallbackEx+0x83 mscorwks.dll!AddTimerCallback+0x10 mscorwks.dll!ThreadpoolMgr::AsyncTimerCallbackCompletion+0x64 mscorwks.dll!UnManagedPerAppDomainTPCount::DispatchWorkItem+0x9a mscorwks.dll!ThreadpoolMgr::ExecuteWorkRequest+0xaf mscorwks.dll!ThreadpoolMgr::WorkerThreadStart+0x20b mscorwks.dll!Thread::intermediateThreadProc+0x49 KERNEL32.dll!BaseThreadStart+0x37

Application uses System.Threading.Timer to periodically poll for data from several webservices using a WCF client proxy and at any giving time, could be making about 20 of these requests at the same time. Each call to a webservice instantiates a new proxy instance but the client is always closed when a response is received from the webservice.

Application also manipulates with bitmaps for a GIS and this is also done on a periodic interval. No where in code am I explicitly creating threads besides localized usage of the Timer class to poll for data periodically. The GIS does use the BackgroundWorker but they do limit the thread count.

Anyone have an idea on what is spawning these new threads and why they are not being disposed?

TIA.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yeah, looks like something you shouldn't ignore. They are the threadpool thread that the Timer class uses to make the callback. They are deadlocked, looks like they are waiting for a method call that's marshaled by COM to complete. There should be another thread in your program, one of the other 10 on which you created the GIS object. That thread is not pumping a message loop, a hard requirement for an STA thread that creates single apartment threaded COM components. Or it is stuck itself, not re-entering the message loop. Getting a managed stack trace ought to make it easier to see where the thread is stuck.

Trying to use threads on a COM object that explicitly doesn't support them (very few do) is pointless. Be sure to create the GIS object on your program's main UI thread. And use a DispatcherTimer. Creating your own STA thread that pumps a message loop can be a solution when the GIS component is taking too much of a hit on your user interface.

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Problem was not GIS related but was due to Timer call backs queuing up as the timer callback was being called before the previous call had finished. Problem was also augmented by the fact that timer call back was doing a Dispatcher.Invoke to the main user interface thread to update data grids. Dispatcher.Invoke was blocking and before timer call back would have a chance to complete, it was invoked again. –  Klaus Nji Nov 23 '10 at 23:19

Problem was not GIS related but was due to System.Threading.Timer call backs queuing up as they were being called faster than they could be actioned. Problem was further compounded by the fact that timer call back was doing a Dispatcher.Invoke to the main user interface thread to refresh data grids. Dispatcher.Invoke was blocking when main user interface was busy, say when user was panning and zooming on map, and before timer call back got a chance to complete it was invoked again.

Fixed problem by temporarily stopping timer when it starts executing the call back and restarting it again after call back is complete. Also, instead of doing a Dispatcher.Invoke to get my grids updated, I changed it to a Dispatcher.BeginInvoke to avoid blocking.

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