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Fastest algorithm for primality test

Would appreciate a reference to sample code for fast primality testing in C#, preferably using BigInteger or other variable size type.

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marked as duplicate by Jeff Mercado, cdhowie, Matthew Flaschen, Frédéric Hamidi, ChrisF Nov 21 '10 at 21:13

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Well, I understand which are the fastest algorithms available, i.e. AKS, Miller-Rabin, etc. I am looking for an efficient implementation in C#. – Halfdan Faber Nov 21 '10 at 6:23
    
In the meantime I found: emilstefanov.net/Projects/GnuMpDotNet. Looks promising. – Halfdan Faber Nov 21 '10 at 7:15
    
the following is quite faster than the Miller Rabin test given in the answer below stackoverflow.com/a/33627100/44080 – Charles Okwuagwu Nov 10 '15 at 9:57

This is a Miller Rabin test in c#:

    bool MillerRabin(ulong n)
    {
        ulong[] ar;
        if (n < 4759123141) ar = new ulong[] { 2, 7, 61 };
        else if (n < 341550071728321) ar = new ulong[] { 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17 };
        else ar = new ulong[] { 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23 };
        ulong d = n - 1;
        int s = 0;
        while ((d & 1) == 0) { d >>= 1; s++; }
        int i, j;
        for (i = 0; i < ar.Length; i++)
        {
            ulong a   = Math.Min(n - 2, ar[i]);
            ulong now = pow(a, d, n);
            if (now == 1) continue;
            if (now == n - 1) continue;
            for (j = 1; j < s; j++)
            {
                now = mul(now, now, n);
                if (now == n - 1) break;
            }
            if (j == s) return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

    ulong mul(ulong a, ulong b, ulong mod)
    {
        int i;
        ulong now = 0;
        for (i = 63; i >= 0; i--) if (((a >> i) & 1) == 1) break;
        for (; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            now <<= 1;
            while (now > mod) now -= mod;
            if (((a >> i) & 1) == 1) now += b;
            while (now > mod) now -= mod;
        }
        return now;
    }

    ulong pow(ulong a, ulong p, ulong mod)
    {
        if (p == 0) return 1;
        if (p % 2 == 0) return pow(mul(a, a, mod), p / 2, mod);
        return mul(pow(a, p - 1, mod), a, mod);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Saeed: Thanks much. I converted the code to take the BigInteger type. Works great and extremely fast. – Halfdan Faber Nov 26 '10 at 5:15
    
Thank you so much! – amuliar Oct 4 '11 at 23:00
    
This is beautiful. I was wondering how you came up with the ar values? Any references I could look up? – Chris Apr 30 '14 at 0:50
    
@Chris, take a look at the sequence A014233. – Saeed Amiri May 23 '14 at 12:31
    
This is not a primality test, but in fact a compositeness test. Just because a number passes does not mean it is prime. – Dubslow Nov 30 '15 at 22:49

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