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I have a frustrating problem when I want to use the pipe(|) feature with the Window's CMD shell's CALL :Label option. I have a very small example (below): call-test.cmd and sample output.

The nub of the issue was/is to pipe the output of a CMD script to another program, for example the tee utility, or find command. For example:

    @call   :Label-02  param  | tee call-test.log

Which would start the current command file at the label Label-02 and pipe the output to tee. Unfortunately using the pipe character(|) on the line with "call :label" option gives an error:

Invalid attempt to call batch label outside of batch script.

Whereas, "call example.cmd | tee example.log", works just fine.

The other IO redirection > works OK. It is just the one case when "call :label pipe(|)" is used that fails. To me it just looks like a windows bug.

Does anyone have a workaround and/or know of an explanation?

Thanks, Will


  • call-test output

    c:\> call-test
        [start]
        label 03 :: p1
    Invalid attempt to call batch label outside of batch script.
    Invalid attempt to call batch label outside of batch script.
        [done]
    Press any key to continue . . .
    
  • call-test

    @echo off 
    @rem   call-test.cmd
    @rem  _________________________________________________
    @rem    Test :label call option for .cmd files.
    @rem
    @echo   ^  [start]
    @call   :Label-03  p1
    @call   :Label-02  second  | find " "
    @call   :Label-02  second  | tee call-test.log
    @goto   Done
    @rem  _________________________________________________
    :Label-01 
    @echo   ^  label 01 :: %1
    @goto Exit
    @rem  _________________________________________________
    :Label-02 
    @echo   ^  label 02 :: %1
    @goto Exit
    @rem  _________________________________________________
    :Label-03 
    @echo   ^  label 03 :: %1
    @goto Exit
    @rem  _________________________________________________
    :Done 
    @echo   ^  [done]
    @pause
    @rem  _________________________________________________
    :Exit 
    @exit /b
    
share|improve this question
5  
You don't have to @ every line if you have @echo off. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 21 '10 at 10:55

5 Answers 5

I think you can use "|" then pipe is treated as just regular character.

share|improve this answer
2  
You are right, but that wasn't the question. The OP don't wan't to handle the pipe character, the output of a function should be piped –  jeb Oct 25 '13 at 20:42

put the ^ in front of the pipe command....e.g.

@call :Label-02 second ^| find " "

share|improve this answer
5  
That doesn't work. Is it unfair to suggest people 'test' or 'experiment' with an idea before posting? –  will Jan 7 '11 at 14:50
1  
review your answer and then post –  Ghost Answer Dec 3 '12 at 12:51

I realize this comes a bit late, but might be helpful for others. this isn't quite a hack, more a workaround. Or pretty "nice hack" if you must. I'm using the following solution to a similar problem:

@echo off

SET CURRENT_SCRIPT_IS=%~dpnx0
IF NOT "%RUN_TO_LABEL%" == "" (
  call :%RUN_TO_LABEL% %1 %2 %3 %4 %5 %6 %7 %8 %9
  goto:eof
)

goto over_debug_stuff

:debugstr
  echo %~1
  echo %~1>>%2
goto:eof

:debuglbl
  SET RUN_TO_LABEL=%1
  for /f "tokens=*" %%L in ('%CURRENT_SCRIPT_IS% %3 %4 %5 %6 %7 %8 %9') do (
    echo %%L
    echo %%L>>%2
  )
  SET RUN_TO_LABEL=
goto:eof

:over_debug_stuff

call :debugstr "this is a string" "test_str.txt"
call :debuglbl tst "test_lbl.txt"

goto:eof

:tst
  echo label line 1
  echo label line 2
  echo label line 3
goto:eof

The nice thing about it is that I can copy-paste the "header" into any batch script I need to run it in. I didn't bother to make it recursive-safe as I didn't needed it, so make sure you test that scenario before putting it in. Obviously, I have wrapper functions on these debug* calls, so that I don't carry around the log file with each call. Also, in my debug log calls, I also test for the debug flag, so the wrapper itself has some more logic to it, which mainly depends on the script used in.

share|improve this answer
    
I guess this workaround is specifically for call :label ... | tee ..., not for call :label ... | any_command ..., am I right? –  Andriy M Jan 23 '12 at 21:07
    
more or less. I have written it specifically to log and display teh same things without executing it twice (just as the tee solution) but you can do anything in the "debuglbl" function. so you would basically move the any_command in the debuglbl body (obviously name the label accordingly) and you can have any functionality you like (maybe the "any" is a bit strong here) the error basically is pretty self-explanatory and the net is also full with the same explanations for it: the call :label is not a command line feature but a batch script one so you can't use it there. –  ciuly Jan 24 '12 at 19:41
    
this "command line" and "batch script" differences is very similar to the sql and plsql differences. just as you do for %%I in when inside the batch script but you must write for %I in, when you're in command line, there are also otehr differences, among which you cannot call labels. Which is obvious since the label is not defined in the command interpreter environment, its defined in the script. Just like in oracle, you can use for example the BOOLEAN type in plsql, but not in sql. I think you get the picture –  ciuly Jan 24 '12 at 19:45
    
More or less. :) I mean, given the parallel you've drawn and knowing what I know about the differences between batch files and the command line, I do now understand better the nature of the differences between SQL and PL/SQL. (With regard to SQL, I've been mostly a SQL Server person all this time, you see.) Still, the main point is, I've been educated either way, thanks. :) –  Andriy M Jan 24 '12 at 20:40
    
you have a nice cat, ciuly –  naxa May 21 at 9:59

The cause is, that a pipe starts both sides in a cmd context (both run parallel in one cmd-box), and each side is interpreted as a real command line argument, and on the cmd line labels aren't allowed.

But you can call your function, if you restart your batch.

if not "%1"=="" goto %1
@call "%~0" :Label-02  param  | tee call-test.log

EDIT: The complete sample

@echo off
if not "%~1"=="START" goto :normalStart
shift 
shift 
call %0 %1 %2 %3 %4 %5 %6 %7 %8
exit /b

:normalStart
rem   call-test.cmd
rem  _________________________________________________
rem    Test :label call option for .cmd files.
rem
echo   ^  [start]
rem call   :Label-03  p1
rem call   :Label-02  second  | find " "
call "%~dpf0" "START" :Label-02  second  |  tee call-test.log
goto   Done
rem  _________________________________________________
:Label-01 
echo   ^  label 01 :: %1
goto Exit
rem  _________________________________________________
:Label-02 
echo   ^  label 02 :: %1
goto Exit
rem  _________________________________________________
:Label-03 
echo   ^  label 03 :: %1
goto Exit
rem  _________________________________________________
:Done 
echo   ^  [done]
pause
rem  _________________________________________________
:Exit 
exit /b
share|improve this answer
1  
To be fair to other readers, I need to point out that this suggestion is in error. There are two things broken. The first is the original issue with a pipe(|) not working with the call. And the second is that the syntax: call "%~0" :Label-02 param Fails when you try to use it. While I could and did try jumping to a label manually with a GOTO, it is a hack and it would be better to have a second .CMD script. (Which is the thing I want to avoid here). –  will Nov 25 '10 at 21:34
    
I tested it with XP and Vista and it works (also with the pipe), only the %1 in your functions has to be moved to %2 –  jeb Nov 26 '10 at 19:10
    
Fair comment -- The 'solution' sought; is to pipe output to the 'tee' command. I know the '@call' and parameters work if we hack them about. –  will Jan 7 '11 at 14:54
    
I hope, the complete sample is what you want –  jeb Jan 7 '11 at 17:05
    
well, is | tee call-test.log hardcoded into the batch file, can that be avoided? –  naxa May 21 at 10:01

The obvious workaround is to redirect output of call to temporary file, use it as an input for find/tee, then delete file:

@call :Label-02 second > tmp
tee call-test.log < tmp
delete tmp
share|improve this answer
    
That's more helpful. The value of tee is to catch a problem in the flow of the work. These are long jobs. I had log files before and the job was finished before I knew there was a problem. –  will Nov 25 '10 at 21:39

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