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I am trying to retrieve the following information: For each customer whose average order amount is greater than $1,800, list the customer name, cust# and total number of orders.

my code is currently.

SELECT c.cname, c.`cust#`, COUNT(oi.`order#`)
FROM CUSTOMER c, `ORDER` o, `ORDER_ITEM` oi
WHERE c.`cust#` = o.`cust#` 
AND o.`order#` = oi.`order#` 
AND AVG(o.`ord_amt`) > 1800
GROUP BY c.cname, c .`cust#`

THE TABLES AND FIELDS TO MY DATABASE

customer(cust#:char(3), cname:varchar(30), city:varchar(20))
order (order# :char(4), odate, cust#:char(3), ord_amt:decimal(10.2))
order_item( order# :char(4), item#: char(4), qty:int(11))
item(item# :char(4), unit_price:decimal(10.2))
shipment(order# :char(4), warehouse# :char(4), ship_date:date)
warehouse (warehouse#: char(4), city:varchar(20))
share|improve this question

You should use JOIN notation and a HAVING clause to compare the aggregate; you don't need the order items table:

SELECT c.cname, c.`cust#`, COUNT(oi.`order#`)
  FROM CUSTOMER c JOIN `ORDER` o ON c.`cust#` = o.`cust#` 
 GROUP BY c.cname, c .`cust#`
HAVING AVG(o.`ord_amt`) > 1800

(Order of GROUP BY and HAVING fixed per comment by GolezTrol - thanks; my excuse is that it was late at night.)

share|improve this answer
    
I think you need to put GROUP BY above HAVING. – GolezTrol Nov 21 '10 at 9:09
    
If i were to go about retrieving the information of the total number of warehouses for orders shipped from at least two warehouses. Wouldn't I need a nested clause? – Meat Nov 21 '10 at 10:32
    
@Meat: That sounds like another GROUP BY and HAVING clause query on two tables with a direct join - almost isomorphic with the existing query. – Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '10 at 15:19

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