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So I have this program:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;


bool prime(int input)
{
//    cout << "pinput: " << input << endl;
    int i = ((input/2) + 1);
  //      cout << "pi: " << i << endl;
    int c;
    for (i>0; i--;){
        //cout << "pi: " << i << endl;
        if (input == 3 || input == 2){
         //   cout << "true" << endl;
            return true;
        }
        if (input == 1){
       //     cout << "pi = 1" << endl;
            return false;
        }
    c= input%i;
    if (c==0 || i == 1 ){
     //   cout << "false" << endl;
        return false;
    }
    else if (c!=0 && i<4){
   //     cout << "true" << endl;
        return true;
    }
    }
return 0;
}

int factor(int input){
//    cout << "finput: " << input << endl;
   int i = (input/2) + 1;
    int c;
    int e;
    bool d = false;
    for (i>0; i--;){
  // cout << "fi: " << i << endl;
        c = input%i;
        if (c==0){
        d = prime(i);
        if (d==true){
    //    cout << "found" << endl;
        return i;}
        }
        if (i==1){
  //          cout << "fi = 1";
            return 0;
        }
//cout << "not prime" << endl;
        }
    return 0;
}

int main(){
    int woot;
    cout << "Please insert quater: " <<endl;
    cin >> woot;
    int answer;
    answer = factor(woot);
    if (answer == 0)
    cout << "no prime factors" << endl;
    else
    cout << "answer is: " <<answer << endl;

return 0;
}

It seems to work until I put a really big number in like more specifically the number 600851475143, in which case I always get different answers when I run that number now I'm pretty sure it's just exceeding the size of it's variable type. Now then I was looking and I can't find the right variable type for a number that big, I int and long seem to be for numbers that are for numbers up to 4294967295 if unsigned however that is only 10 digits long, mine is 12. What type of variable should I use? Or will that even fix the problem? The program is to find the largest prime factor of a number (Euler problem 3). Any tips links or advice would be appreciated. And of course an answer extra appreciated! :D

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1  
You should move the first two checks inside your loop to outside your loop (if input is 2 or 3 return true and if it is 1 return false). You don't need to check for this each time because the input value never changes. –  dreamlax Nov 21 '10 at 9:48
    
Good advice! I'll take it! Do you have any idea how to use the libraries the answers given are suggesting? I'm a programming noob and have never needed to implement a library. –  Samuraisoulification Nov 21 '10 at 9:50

5 Answers 5

Interesting typo alert!

This is unlikely to be doing what you think it is doing...

for (i>0; i--;){

While it is perfectly legal syntax, and will loop the correct number of times, the value of i inside the loop is (probably) going to be one less than you intended...

% cat 4237157.c++ 
#include <iostream>

int main() 
{
    {
        std::cout << "Your loop: " << std::endl;
        int i = 10;
        for (i>0; i--;) 
        {
            std::cout << i << std::endl;
        }
    }
    {
        std::cout << "More conventionally: " << std::endl;
        for (int i = 10; i > 0; i--) 
        {
            std::cout << i << std::endl;
        }
    }
    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

% g++ -o 4237157{,.c++}

% ./4237157 
Your loop: 
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
More conventionally: 
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1

The syntax for a for-loop in C-like languages is:

for (variable initialization; conditional; variable increment)

You are evaluating "i>0" instead of doing any initalization. This may as well be blank. Then you are evaluating whether i-- is zero. Since i is post-decremented, your loop starts with i being one less than it was initialized with before the loop, executes until (and including) being equal to zero and then terminates.

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So what should that for () look like in this case? I was noticing that it was happening and I compensated for it, but wasn't sure why it was happening. –  Samuraisoulification Nov 21 '10 at 10:18
    
I think there's enough information in my answer for even "a programming noob" to be able to deduce for (; i > 0; i--). Or (better still) for (; i > 0; --i). You'll also have to revert whatever you did to "compensate for it". –  Johnsyweb Nov 21 '10 at 10:42

A lot of the problems on Project Euler call for arbitrary-precision arithmetic, which isn't covered by the C++ standard library.

Have a look at the C++ Big Integer Library.

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How do I use it? Like put it into my code and most things? Can you give me an idea of what to google? Like libraries? Or is something else better? –  Samuraisoulification Nov 21 '10 at 9:28

If you want arbitarily big numbers, you need an arbitary precision arithmetic library

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How do I go about procuring this library? And putting it into my program. –  Samuraisoulification Nov 21 '10 at 9:22
    
Also what do I do after that? –  Samuraisoulification Nov 21 '10 at 9:23
    
You basically replace all aritmetic operations (+, -, *, /, =) with function calls. –  Ross Nov 21 '10 at 9:25
1  
@Ross, but many C++ arbitrary precision libraries use operator overloading, so you can actually use the same syntax. –  Matthew Flaschen Nov 21 '10 at 9:26
    
Good point. I only used lib with function calls. –  Ross Nov 21 '10 at 9:28

unsigned long                 4294967295
unsigned long long  18446744073709551615

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unsigned long long is not standard C++, but most compilers support it as an extension. The maximum should be at least 2^64 - 1, which is more than enough.

If you later want even larger numbers, you can use a arbitrary precision library such as GMP. They have a C++ interface.

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