Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to pass the value of p to the alert function - unfortunately at the moment it just comes up as undefined. I think the problem is because when that function is called p doesn't exist anymore. How would I pass p to that function and make it retain the value?

function B(p,u) {
    var foo = {};
    foo[u] = function(p) {
        alert('visit internal page '+p);
    };
    $.router(foo);
}

B("about", "!/about");
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just leave it off the parameter list, like this:

function B(p,u) {
    var foo = {};
    foo[u] = function() {
        alert('visit internal page '+p);
    };
    $.router(foo);
}

Currently you're specifying a parameter p on the inner function, and unless that's provided when it's called (doesn't seem it is) that more local p variable will be undefined. Instead just don't specify it as a parameter, and it'll use the p from the parent scope.

share|improve this answer
    
Fantastic, that was easier than I expected! No idea why that works though, I'll have to do some research. Thanks for the answer! –  RichW Nov 21 '10 at 11:02
1  
@RichW - any variables in the parent scope are available to use, any parameter on a function at any level however has to be specified, so when you have function(p) and just call it via foo[u](), it'll be undefined...since you didn't pass any parameters, but by leaving it off the only p it can possibly use is the one in the parent scope...does that make any more sense? –  Nick Craver Nov 21 '10 at 11:08
    
Makes perfect sense now, thanks Nick! Unfortunately it's one of those problems that seems difficult to research on Google as you don't know what to type in! –  RichW Nov 21 '10 at 11:12

The problem is that you have two p variables at the same time.

function B(outer_p, u) { // <- first p
    var foo = {};
    foo[u] = function(inner_p) { // <- second p
        alert('visit internal page '+ outer_p); // depending on what 
    };                                          // you want to display here
    $.router(foo);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping the value of p would inherit through the functions (guess it doesn't work like that!). Thanks for the info! –  RichW Nov 21 '10 at 11:03
    
What do you mean by inherit? Outer p is available in your inner function. But if you declare p in the inner function parameter list, it will be assigned undefined by default and will cover/hide the outer p because of name collision. –  galambalazs Nov 21 '10 at 11:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.