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Looking from a programmer's point of view then shell script is just another programming language, where one has to learn and conform to the rules of the language. However, I have to admit that this syntax is the weirdest style I have ever seen in a rather commonly used language. Did the shell take this syntax from an older language that it descents from? Is there a special implication / meaning in the syntax?

As an example, here is a little snippet that I take from another post on SO

case "$1" in
    start)
        start
        ;;
    stop)
        stop
        ;;
    restart)
        stop
        start
        ;;
    status)
        check_status
        ;;
    *)
        echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop|restart|status}"
        exit 1
        ;;
esac

Looking at this, firstly I can see that case ends with esac, which is its reversed form (like if ending in fi). Secondly I understand that each case is followed by a ). Fair enough, but why on earth do I need two ; at the end of each statement? I would also say that the ) without an accompanying ( is ugly.

I'm looking for more information about the historical aspect of the language, but I'm open for technical reasons as well.

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1  
So can you guess why a loop is 'for ...; do ...; done' and not 'for ...; do ...; od'? There was a sound reason for it - but the Algol-like reversed keyword to mark the end was used elsewhere. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '10 at 17:43
    
@Jonathan I'm not arguing "why it is like this and not like that?" (I think I made this clear at the beginning). My question is more like "Where did the ugly syntax come from?" –  phunehehe Nov 22 '10 at 12:14
3  
The syntax came from Bourne (of Bourne shell fame). He had worked on Algol, and liked it enough to model some of the shell syntax on Algol. Algol uses reversed keywords to mark the ends of constructs, so 'case ... esac' was appropriate. The reason that loops do not end with 'od' is that there was already a command 'od' in Unix - octal dump. So, 'done' is used instead. (And, by reputation, the Bourne shell source code was written in idiosyncratic C with macros to make it look like Algol. This made it hard to maintain.) –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 22 '10 at 12:29
    
@Jonathan good one, please make it an answer :) –  phunehehe Nov 22 '10 at 16:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Per request:

  • So can you guess why a loop is 'for ...; do ...; done' and not 'for ...; do ...; od'? There was a sound reason for it - but the Algol-like reversed keyword to mark the end was used elsewhere.

Answer:

  • The syntax came from Bourne (of Bourne shell fame). He had worked on Algol, and liked it enough to model some of the shell syntax on Algol. Algol uses reversed keywords to mark the ends of constructs, so 'case ... esac' was appropriate. The reason that loops do not end with 'od' is that there was already a command 'od' in Unix - octal dump. So, 'done' is used instead.

By reputation, the Bourne shell source code was written in idiosyncratic C with macros to make it look like Algol. This made it hard to maintain.

With respect to the main question - about why no opening bracket (parenthesis) around the alternatives in the case statement - I have a couple of related theories.

First of all, back when the Bourne shell was written (late 1970s), much editing was done with 'ed', the standard text editor. It has no concept of skipping to a balanced parenthesis or other such notations, so there was no requirement for a leading parenthesis. Also, if you are writing a document, you might well marshal your arguments with:

a) ...blah...
b) ...more...
c) ...again...

The opening parenthesis is often omitted - and the case statement would fit into that model quite happily.

Of course, since then, we have grown used to editors that mark the matching open parenthesis when you type a close parenthesis, so the old Bourne shell notation is a nuisance. The POSIX standard makes the leading parenthesis optional; most more modern implementations of POSIX-like shells (Korn, Bash, Zsh) will support that, and I generally use it when I don't have to worry about portability to machines like Solaris 10 where /bin/sh is still a faithful Bourne shell that does not allow the leading parenthesis. (I usually deal with that by using #!/bin/ksh as the shebang.)

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I'd say the "main question" is the origin of the syntax, which is Algol (can't find that on the Wikipedia page for bash). Good answer anyway :) –  phunehehe Nov 23 '10 at 3:41
    
Information on the 'original' Bourne shell can be found at the Heirloom Bourne Shell project at Sourceforge (and other places findable with your favourite search engine). –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 23 '13 at 22:44

A reason of using ;; is that a single ; can be used to write many statements in one line, like:

restart)
   stop; start;;
...
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Bash can accept matching parentheses:

case "$1" in
    (start)
        start
        ;;
    (stop)
        stop
        ;;

    etc.
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1  
POSIX and Korn shells allow the leading parenthesis too. Once upon a long time ago, ed ('the standard text editor' - it said so in the 7th Edition UNIX manual) didn't have a 'bounce cursor to matching open parenthesis' option, so the open parenthesis was not really necessary. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '10 at 17:52
    
Autoconf and friends prefer placing a comment with the appropriate number of open parentheses after in (e.g. case "$1" in # ((). This helps shells which cannot handle a normal case statement inside $() and editors just like the newer syntax does, but also works with the original Bourne shell. –  jilles Nov 21 '10 at 22:18
    
@Dennis nice to know, but was that before or after the non-matching style became popular? –  phunehehe Nov 22 '10 at 12:24
    
@phunehehe: I don't know what you mean unless you want to know whether there was ever a shell that had case/esac that didn't accept open parentheses. The answer to that is "yes". The original Bourne shell is one example. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 22 '10 at 12:33
    
No I mean, did bash accept matching parentheses from its beginning? Or did that come as a feature later when somebody complains about the ugliness? –  phunehehe Nov 22 '10 at 16:12

The closing parenthesis is sometimes used in lists in natural language, like

1) do this
2) do that

The reversed keywords were taken from some form of Algol but are in fact a very good idea for interactive use. They clearly demarcate the end of a construct, including if/else.

For example, with a C-like syntax, after this has been parsed:

if (condition)
    command here;

is there an else coming or not? rc, a shell from Plan 9 with a more C-like syntax, solves this by providing if not instead of else but it is not pretty.

With Bourne shell syntax, you'll have either else or fi and there is no need to read additional input.

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I see your point about lists, but the else part doesn't make much sense. Either way additional input must be read to determine if it is an else or a fi –  phunehehe Nov 22 '10 at 12:22
    
But that additional input is part of the if. With the C-like syntax with else, if there is no else the shell ends up reading the next command, which is rather unexpected in an interactive shell. –  jilles Nov 22 '10 at 22:30

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