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I want to wait for a Task<T> to complete with some special rules: If it hasn't completed after X milliseconds, I want to display a message to the user. And if it hasn't completed after Y milliseconds, I want to automatically request cancellation.

I can use Task.ContinueWith to asynchronously wait for the task to complete (i.e. schedule an action to be executed when the task is complete), but that doesn't allow to specify a timeout. I can use Task.Wait to synchronously wait for the task to complete with a timeout, but that blocks my thread. How can I asynchronously wait for the task to complete with a timeout?

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2  
You are right. I am surprised it does not provide for timeout. Maybe in .NET 5.0... Of course we can build the timeout into the task itself but that is no good, such things must come free. –  Aliostad Nov 21 '10 at 14:46
2  
While it would still require logic for the two-tier timeout you describe, .NET 4.5 does indeed offer a simple method for creating a timeout-based CancellationTokenSource. Two overloads to the constructor are available, one taking a integer millisecond delay and one taking a TimeSpan delay. –  patridge Jul 31 '12 at 18:24
    
The complete simple lib source here: stackoverflow.com/questions/11831844/… –  user1997529 Jan 21 '13 at 15:33
    
any final solution with full source code working ? maybe more complex sample for notify errors in each thread and after WaitAll shows a summary ? –  Kiquenet Jan 1 at 10:55

7 Answers 7

up vote 105 down vote accepted

How about this:

int timeout = 1000;
var task = SomeOperationAsync();
if (await Task.WhenAny(task, Task.Delay(timeout)) == task) {
    // task completed within timeout
} else { 
    // timeout logic
}

And here's a great blog post "Crafting a Task.TimeoutAfter Method" (from MS Parallel Library team) with more info on this sort of thing.

Addition: at the request of a comment on my answer, here is an expanded solution that includes cancellation handling. Note that passing cancellation to the task and the timer means that there are multiple ways cancellation can be experienced in your code, and you should be sure to test for and be confident you properly handle all of them. Don't leave to chance various combinations and hope your computer does the right thing at runtime.

int timeout = 1000;
var task = SomeOperationAsync(cancellationToken);
if (await Task.WhenAny(task, Task.Delay(timeout, cancellationToken)) == task)
{
    // Task completed within timeout.
    // Consider that the task may have faulted or been canceled.
    // We re-await the task so that any exceptions/cancellation is rethrown.
    await task;

}
else
{
    // timeout/cancellation logic
}
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 Beautiful solution –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Dec 25 '12 at 13:03
14  
It should be mentioned that even though Task.Delay can complete before long running task, allowing you to handle a timeout scenario, this does NOT cancel the long running task itself; WhenAny simply lets you know that one of the tasks passed to it has completed. You will have to implement a CancellationToken and cancel the long running task yourself. –  Jeff Schumacher Aug 23 '13 at 15:40
1  
It may also be noted that the Task.Delay task is backed by a system timer which will continue to be tracked until the timeout expires regardless of how long SomeOperationAsync takes. So if this overall code snippet executes a lot in a tight loop, you're consuming system resources for timers until they all timeout. The way to fix that would be to have a CancellationToken that you pass to Task.Delay(timeout, cancellationToken) that you cancel when SomeOperationAsync completes to release the timer resource. –  Andrew Arnott Jan 17 at 13:49
    
@JeffSchumacher It would be amazingly useful if somebody could demonstrate an example of implementing a CancellationToken using the structure in the answer. –  Chris P Aug 7 at 15:13
1  
@ChrisP I've added to my answer. Does that satisfy your request? –  Andrew Arnott Aug 19 at 5:30

You can use Task.WaitAny to wait the first of multiple tasks.

You could create two additional tasks (that complete after the specified timeouts) and then use WaitAny to wait for whichever completes first. If the task that completed first is your "work" task, then you're don. If the task that completed first is a timeout task, then you can react to the timeout (e.g. request cancellation).

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I've seen this technique used by an MVP I really respect, it seems much cleaner to me than the accepted answer. Perhaps an example would help get more votes! I'd volunteer to do it except I don't have enough Task experience to be confident it would be helpful :) –  GrahamMc Feb 7 '13 at 12:59
1  
one thread would be blocked - but if u r ok with that then no problem. The solution I took was the one below, since no threads are blocked. I read the blog post which was really good. –  JJschk Feb 8 '13 at 15:14

What about something like this?

    const int x = 3000;
    const int y = 1000;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // Your scheduler
        TaskScheduler scheduler = TaskScheduler.Default;

        Task nonblockingTask = new Task(() =>
            {
                CancellationTokenSource source = new CancellationTokenSource();

                Task t1 = new Task(() =>
                    {
                        while (true)
                        {
                            // Do something
                            if (source.IsCancellationRequested)
                                break;
                        }
                    }, source.Token);

                t1.Start(scheduler);

                // Wait for task 1
                bool firstTimeout = t1.Wait(x);

                if (!firstTimeout)
                {
                    // If it hasn't finished at first timeout display message
                    Console.WriteLine("Message to user: the operation hasn't completed yet.");

                    bool secondTimeout = t1.Wait(y);

                    if (!secondTimeout)
                    {
                        source.Cancel();
                        Console.WriteLine("Operation stopped!");
                    }
                }
            });

        nonblockingTask.Start();
        Console.WriteLine("Do whatever you want...");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

You can use the Task.Wait option without blocking main thread using another Task.

share|improve this answer
    
In fact in this example you are not waiting inside t1 but on an upper task. I'll try to make a more detailed example. –  as-cii Nov 21 '10 at 15:16
    
I hope this example is more clear to you. –  as-cii Nov 21 '10 at 15:25

Use a Timer to handle the message and automatic cancellation. When the Task completes, call Dispose on the timers so that they will never fire. Here is an example; change taskDelay to 500, 1500, or 2500 to see the different cases:

using System;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        private static Task CreateTaskWithTimeout(
            int xDelay, int yDelay, int taskDelay)
        {
            var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
            var token = cts.Token;
            var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
            {
                // Do some work, but fail if cancellation was requested
                token.WaitHandle.WaitOne(taskDelay);
                token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
                Console.WriteLine("Task complete");
            });
            var messageTimer = new Timer(state =>
            {
                // Display message at first timeout
                Console.WriteLine("X milliseconds elapsed");
            }, null, xDelay, -1);
            var cancelTimer = new Timer(state =>
            {
                // Display message and cancel task at second timeout
                Console.WriteLine("Y milliseconds elapsed");
                cts.Cancel();
            }
                , null, yDelay, -1);
            task.ContinueWith(t =>
            {
                // Dispose the timers when the task completes
                // This will prevent the message from being displayed
                // if the task completes before the timeout
                messageTimer.Dispose();
                cancelTimer.Dispose();
            });
            return task;
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var task = CreateTaskWithTimeout(1000, 2000, 2500);
            // The task has been started and will display a message after
            // one timeout and then cancel itself after the second
            // You can add continuations to the task
            // or wait for the result as needed
            try
            {
                task.Wait();
                Console.WriteLine("Done waiting for task");
            }
            catch (AggregateException ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error waiting for task:");
                foreach (var e in ex.InnerExceptions)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(e);
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

Also, the Async CTP provides a TaskEx.Delay method that will wrap the timers in tasks for you. This can give you more control to do things like set the TaskScheduler for the continuation when the Timer fires.

private static Task CreateTaskWithTimeout(
    int xDelay, int yDelay, int taskDelay)
{
    var cts = new CancellationTokenSource();
    var token = cts.Token;
    var task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        // Do some work, but fail if cancellation was requested
        token.WaitHandle.WaitOne(taskDelay);
        token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        Console.WriteLine("Task complete");
    });

    var timerCts = new CancellationTokenSource();

    var messageTask = TaskEx.Delay(xDelay, timerCts.Token);
    messageTask.ContinueWith(t =>
    {
        // Display message at first timeout
        Console.WriteLine("X milliseconds elapsed");
    }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);

    var cancelTask = TaskEx.Delay(yDelay, timerCts.Token);
    cancelTask.ContinueWith(t =>
    {
        // Display message and cancel task at second timeout
        Console.WriteLine("Y milliseconds elapsed");
        cts.Cancel();
    }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnRanToCompletion);

    task.ContinueWith(t =>
    {
        timerCts.Cancel();
    });

    return task;
}
share|improve this answer
    
He doesn't want the current thread to be blocked, that is, no task.Wait(). –  Danny Chen Nov 21 '10 at 15:29
    
@Danny: That was just to make the example complete. After the ContinueWith you could return and let the task run. I'll update my answer to make that more clear. –  Quartermeister Nov 21 '10 at 15:36
    
I've updated my question. Could you have a look? –  dtb Nov 21 '10 at 16:04
1  
@dtb: What if you make t1 a Task<Task<Result>> and then call TaskExtensions.Unwrap? You can return t2 from your inner lambda, and you can add continuations to the unwrapped task afterwards. –  Quartermeister Nov 21 '10 at 16:10
    
Awesome! That perfectly solves my problem. Thanks! I think I will go with the solution proposed by @AS-CII, although I wish I could accept your answer as well for suggesting TaskExtensions.Unwrap Shall I open a new question so you can get the rep you deserve? –  dtb Nov 21 '10 at 16:22

Here's a extension method version that incorporates cancellation of the timeout when the original task completes as suggested by Andrew Arnott in a comment to his answer.

public static async Task<TResult> TimeoutAfter<TResult>(this Task<TResult> task, TimeSpan timeout) {

    var timeoutCancellationTokenSource = new CancellationTokenSource();

    var completedTask = await Task.WhenAny(task, Task.Delay(timeout, timeoutCancellationTokenSource.Token));
    if (completedTask == task) {
        timeoutCancellationTokenSource.Cancel();
        return await task;
    } else {
        throw new TimeoutException("The operation has timed out.");
    }
}
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I'm late to the party, but doesn't the await in all these solutions cause it to block, thus making the asynchronous call synced? –  Kir Jul 7 at 21:01
    
@Kir No it doesn't, in fact using await with Task.WhenAny is what allows it not to block (control is returned to the caller until the awaited task has completed). Perhaps you're thinking of something like Tomas Petricek's solution stackoverflow.com/a/4238575/1512 using Task.WaitAny which does block until one of the tasks has completed. –  Lawrence Johnston Jul 7 at 21:12
    
I got a chance to try this finally, and you're right! I'm a little bit confused though - I'm rusty on my Tasks stuff. Why does this work? TimeoutAfter has an await on Task.WhenAny; shouldn't it block until either one of those completes, even when you do not await the TimeoutAfter? –  Kir Jul 8 at 13:36
    
@Kir I don't think I could explain it well in a comment. You should consider opening a new question about it. –  Lawrence Johnston Jul 9 at 19:38

Here is a fully worked example based on the top voted answer, which is:

int timeout = 1000;
var task = SomeOperationAsync();
if (await Task.WhenAny(task, Task.Delay(timeout)) == task) {
    // task completed within timeout
} else { 
    // timeout logic
}

The main advantage of the implementation below is that generics have been added, so the function (or task) can return a value. This means that any existing function can be wrapped in a timeout function, e.g.:

Before:

int x = MyFunc();

After:

// Throws a TimeoutException if MyFunc takes more than 1 second
int x = TimeoutAfter(MyFunc, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));

This code requires .NET 4.5.

using System;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace TaskTimeout
{
    public static class Program
    {
        /// <summary>
        ///     Demo of how to wrap any function in a timeout.
        /// </summary>
        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {

            // Version without timeout.
            int a = MyFunc();
            Console.Write("Result: {0}\n", a);
            // Version with timeout.
            int b = TimeoutAfter(() => { return MyFunc(); },TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
            Console.Write("Result: {0}\n", b);
            // Version with timeout (short version that uses method groups). 
            int c = TimeoutAfter(MyFunc, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
            Console.Write("Result: {0}\n", c);

            // Version that lets you see what happens when a timeout occurs.
            try
            {               
                int d = TimeoutAfter(
                    () =>
                    {
                        Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(123));
                        return 42;
                    },
                    TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
                Console.Write("Result: {0}\n", d);
            }
            catch (TimeoutException e)
            {
                Console.Write("Exception: {0}\n", e.Message);
            }

            // Version that works on tasks.
            var task = Task.Run(() =>
            {
                Thread.Sleep(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1));
                return 42;
            });

            // To use async/await, add "await" and remove "GetAwaiter().GetResult()".
            var result = task.TimeoutAfterAsync(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(2)).
                           GetAwaiter().GetResult();

            Console.Write("Result: {0}\n", result);

            Console.Write("[any key to exit]");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        public static int MyFunc()
        {
            return 42;
        }

        public static TResult TimeoutAfter<TResult>(
            this Func<TResult> func, TimeSpan timeout)
        {
            var task = Task.Run(func);
            return TimeoutAfterAsync(task, timeout).GetAwaiter().GetResult();
        }

        private static async Task<TResult> TimeoutAfterAsync<TResult>(
            this Task<TResult> task, TimeSpan timeout)
        {
            var result = await Task.WhenAny(task, Task.Delay(timeout));
            if (result == task)
            {
                // Task completed within timeout.
                return task.GetAwaiter().GetResult();
            }
            else
            {
                // Task timed out.
                throw new TimeoutException();
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

It seems that we can't resolve this issue by Task<T> itself only. We must use something else to help, such as a System.Threading.Timer. Use the timer to watch the status of your Task<T> and do corresponding actions. This solution seems to be primitive, but it does help in this issue.

share|improve this answer
    
@dtb: If you want to get the result as soon as it's finished and can't wait even 0.x seconds, a timer won't help because a timer can only check the task's status every tick. –  Danny Chen Nov 21 '10 at 15:32

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