Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to use sed in a shell script in Applescript to strip this string - ?print=1 - from this html link in the variable the_html, which is <a href="http://myurl.com.html?print=1">my link</a>

but this throws an error:

set new_html to do shell script "echo " & quoted form of the_html & " | sed s=?print=1= =g'"

Do I need to escape the "="?

Edit:

Works now. Applescript didn't like an = escaped with a \, but escaping the whole string works:

sed 's/?print=1//g'
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try this:

echo '<a href="http://myurl.com.html?print=1">my link</a>' | sed 's/?print=1/ /g'

Comments:

  • Put the HTML in quotes or escape it property
  • When using sed, you generally use slashes: 's/a/b/'
share|improve this answer

This works on my Mac:

echo '<a href="http://myurl.com.html?print=1">my link</a>' | sed 's=?print\=1= =g'

So the answer is, yes, you do need to escape the = since it is used an expression delimiter.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I neglected to menntion that I am using the shell script in Applescript, and Applescript didn't like the \ to escape the =. –  markratledge Nov 21 '10 at 19:31

Yes. You need to escape the characters that have a special meaning. Now there are the standard regular expression special characters, and the character that you are using as a delimiter. So if you use = as the delimiter, you'll need to escape it with \.

Usually / is used as the delimiter. The exception is when you might be searching for /, which yields some pretty crazy and hard to read expressions with all the escaping. So if you're searching for /s, I'd suggest using a different character, but otherwise, stick to /.

To answer the immediate question, you might escape the =:

sed '=print\=1= =g'

or use the standard slash, without escaping the =:

sed '/print=1/ /g'

share|improve this answer

You don't need to escape '=' if using another sed separator like '/' or ','. But if you wish to get URL parameters:

With '?' prefix:

 echo '<a href="http://myurl.com.html?print=1">my link</a>' \
    | sed -e 's,.*\(?.*\)\".*,\1,'

Without the '?' :

echo '<a href="http://myurl.com.html?print=1">my link</a>' \
    | sed -e 's,.*?\(.*\)\".*,\1,'

The best is also to split parameters:

$ echo '<a href="http://myurl.com.html?print=1&convert=4">my link</a>' \
    | sed -e 's,.*?\(.*\)\".*,\1,' -e 's,&,\n,g'
print=1
convert=4

Have fun ! :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.