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How to check internet access on Android? InetAddress never timeouts

I need to detect whether the Android device is connected to the Internet.

The NetworkInfo class provides a non-static method isAvailable() that sounds perfect.

Problem is that:

NetworkInfo ni = new NetworkInfo();
if (!ni.isAvailable()) {
    // do something
}

throws this error:

The constructor NetworkInfo is not visible.

Safe bet is there is another class that returns a NetworkInfo object. But I don't know which.

  1. How to get the above snippet of code to work?
  2. How could I have found myself the information I needed in the online documentation?
  3. Can you suggest a better way for this type of detection?
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marked as duplicate by Anna Lear Jan 10 '12 at 2:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
[This][1] might help as well [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/6179906/… –  anargund Jul 15 '11 at 21:58
1  
Article on android.com: Determining and Monitoring the Connectivity Status –  Alexander Malakhov Oct 15 '13 at 6:17
    

6 Answers 6

up vote 556 down vote accepted

The getActiveNetworkInfo() method of ConnectivityManager returns a NetworkInfo instance representing the first connected network interface it can find or null if none if the interfaces are connected. Checking if this method returns null should be enough to tell if an internet connection is available.

private boolean isNetworkAvailable() {
    ConnectivityManager connectivityManager 
          = (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
    NetworkInfo activeNetworkInfo = connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo();
    return activeNetworkInfo != null && activeNetworkInfo.isConnected();
}

You will also need:

<uses-permission android:name="android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE" />

in your android manifest.

Edit:

Note that having an active network interface doesn't guarantee that a particular networked service is available. Networks issues, server downtime, low signal, captive portals, content filters and the like can all prevent your app from reaching a server. For instance you can't tell for sure if your app can reach Twitter until you receive a valid response from the Twitter service.

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6  
It it worth to take a look at connectiontimeout if somebody (unnecessarily) try call this function before making http call! :-) –  Vikas Aug 4 '11 at 6:19
38  
To be safe I would return activeNetworkInfo != null && activeNetworkInfo.isConnectedOrConnecting(); –  Jeff Axelrod May 26 '12 at 16:38
1  
From the documentation of getActiveNetworkInfo(): When connected, this network is the default route for outgoing connections. You should always check isConnected() before initiating network traffic., so do as @JeffAxelrod suggests, perhaps using isConnected() instead of isConnectedOrConnecting(). –  Eric Simonton Feb 14 '13 at 22:05
3  
If you are creating a Utils method i.e. not accessing this from where Context reference is available, you'll need to pass Context as an argument. –  Mahendra Jun 11 '13 at 9:19
5  
This does not check if the phone is connected to the internet. Only that a network connection has been made. –  miguel Jan 31 at 2:02

I check for both Wi-fi and Mobile internet as follows...

private boolean haveNetworkConnection() {
    boolean haveConnectedWifi = false;
    boolean haveConnectedMobile = false;

    ConnectivityManager cm = (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
    NetworkInfo[] netInfo = cm.getAllNetworkInfo();
    for (NetworkInfo ni : netInfo) {
        if (ni.getTypeName().equalsIgnoreCase("WIFI"))
            if (ni.isConnected())
                haveConnectedWifi = true;
        if (ni.getTypeName().equalsIgnoreCase("MOBILE"))
            if (ni.isConnected())
                haveConnectedMobile = true;
    }
    return haveConnectedWifi || haveConnectedMobile;
}

Obviously, It could easily be modified to check for individual specific connection types, e.g., if your app needs the potentially higher speeds of Wi-fi to work correctly etc.

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17  
The code is good, I just wish people would stick to Java coding style when writing java haveConnectedWifi, haveConnectedMobile. I know it's a small thing, but consistent code is more readable. –  Stuart Axon Dec 9 '10 at 16:37
3  
While on good practice it's better to have the String on the left and not use equalsIgnoreCase if you don't have to: if ("WIFI".equals(ni.getTypeName())) –  Stuart Axon Dec 9 '10 at 16:45
24  
@Stuart Axon: Oh well, that's just how it goes I suppose. I've programmed more languages than I can remember since I started back in the late 1970's and I've obviously picked up many bad habits. In general I go on the principle that if it works then...well, it works and that's all I care about. The code snippet above is completely self-contained and it's easy for anybody with reasonable programming experience to work out and (most importantly) if someone were to cut and paste it into their own code it would work for them. Sorry for being an Android/Java noob. –  Squonk Dec 10 '10 at 7:09
7  
@Stuart Axon: ...and I'm not sure why you felt the need to comment twice on something I posted 2 weeks ago for a question that the asker had long since accepted another answer. –  Squonk Dec 10 '10 at 8:37
4  
@BoD: getType() provides a finer level of granularity (I believe) and might return TYPE_MOBILE, TYPE_MOBILE_DUN, TYPE_MOBILE_HIPRI and so on. I'm not interested in the specifics of what type of 'mobile' connection is available and getTypeName() will simply return 'MOBILE' for all of them. –  Squonk Dec 15 '11 at 18:20

Step 1: Create a class AppStatus in your project(you can give any other name also). Then please paste the given below lines into your code:

import android.content.Context;
import android.net.ConnectivityManager;
import android.net.NetworkInfo;
import android.util.Log;


public class AppStatus {

    private static AppStatus instance = new AppStatus();
    static Context context;
    ConnectivityManager connectivityManager;
    NetworkInfo wifiInfo, mobileInfo;
    boolean connected = false;

    public static AppStatus getInstance(Context ctx) {
        context = ctx.getApplicationContext();
        return instance;
    }

    public boolean isOnline() {
        try {
            connectivityManager = (ConnectivityManager) context
                        .getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);

        NetworkInfo networkInfo = connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo();
        connected = networkInfo != null && networkInfo.isAvailable() &&
                networkInfo.isConnected();
        return connected;


        } catch (Exception e) {
            System.out.println("CheckConnectivity Exception: " + e.getMessage());
            Log.v("connectivity", e.toString());
        }
        return connected;
    }
}

Step 2: Now to check if the your device has network connectivity then just add this code snippet where ever you want to check ...

if (AppStatus.getInstance(this).isOnline()) {

    Toast t = Toast.makeText(this,"You are online!!!!",8000).show();

} else {

    Toast t = Toast.makeText(this,"You are not online!!!!",8000).show();
    Log.v("Home", "############################You are not online!!!!");    
}
share|improve this answer
2  
do you really need to check isAvailable ? I would think isConnected is enough. –  Alexander Malakhov Oct 19 '13 at 9:18
1  
also if you pass the Context to the constructor why do you need to do that in isOnline? –  Svetoslav Marinov Mar 30 at 6:42
    
this crashes my phone. does this still works in June 2014 ? –  Francisco Corrales Morales Jun 3 at 23:42
1  
@AlexanderMalakhov actually isAvailable should be the first check. I have found that if a connection interface is available, this is true. Sometimes (for example, when 'Restrict background data' setting is enabled) isConnected can be false to mean that the interface has no active connection but isAvailable is true to mean the interface is available and you can establish a connection (for example, to transmit foreground data). –  ADTC Aug 10 at 14:18

Also another important note. You have to set android.permission.ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE in your AndroidManifest.xml for this to work.

_ how could I have found myself the information I needed in the online documentation?

You just have to read the documentation the the classes properly enough and you'll find all answers you are looking for. Check out the documentation on ConnectivityManager. The description tells you what to do.

share|improve this answer
5  
The description of the ConnectivityManager class tells me nothing about how to use the class, it's just a listing of method signatures and constant values. There's more info in the answers to this question than there is in that documentation. No mention of the fact that getActiveNetworkInfo() can return null, no mention of the need to have ACCESS_NETWORK_STATE permission, etc. Where exactly did you find this info, other than the Android source? –  dfjacobs Dec 27 '10 at 5:32
2  
Good point dfjacobs. Stackoverflow seems to be the goto source these days for lack of decent cookbook examples. –  Steven Jan 4 '12 at 5:13

The getActiveNetworkInfo() method of ConnectivityManager returns a NetworkInfo instance representing the first connected network interface it can find or null if none if the interfaces are connected. Checking if this method returns null should be enough to tell if an internet connection is available.

private boolean isNetworkAvailable() {
     ConnectivityManager connectivityManager = (ConnectivityManager) getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
     NetworkInfo activeNetworkInfo = connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo();
     return activeNetworkInfo != null; 
}

You will also need:

in your android manifest.

Edit:

Note that having an active network interface doesn't guarantee that a particular networked service is available. Networks issues, server downtime, low signal, captive portals, content filters and the like can all prevent your app from reaching a server. For instance you can't tell for sure if your app can reach Twitter until you receive a valid response from the Twitter service.

getActiveNetworkInfo() shouldn't never give null. I don't know what they were thinking when they came up with that. It should give you an object always.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would you ever want it to return an object if there isn't a single active connection? –  David Liu May 9 '13 at 23:56

Probably I have found myself:

ConnectivityManager connectivityManager =  (ConnectivityManager)getSystemService(Context.CONNECTIVITY_SERVICE);
return connectivityManager.getActiveNetworkInfo().isConnectedOrConnecting();
share|improve this answer
7  
Expect that getActiveNetworkInfo() can return null if there is no active network e.g. Airplane Mode –  Alexandre Jasmin Nov 21 '10 at 16:59
3  
Yes it will return null and this is undocumented. –  w.donahue Jan 26 '11 at 4:06

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