Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this code:

if (argv[i] == "-n") 
{
    wait = atoi(argv[i + 1]);
}
else 
{
    printf("bad argument '%s'\n",argv[i]);
    exit(0);
}

When this code gets executed I get the following error:

bad argument '-n'

I seriously don't know why it does that. Can someone explain?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

String comparisons need a function in C - usually strcmp() from <string.h>.

if (strcmp(argv[i], "-n") == 0) 
{
    wait = atoi(argv[i + 1]);
}
else 
{
    printf("bad argument '%s'\n",argv[i]);
    exit(0);
}

The strcmp() function returns a negative value (not necessarily -1) if the first argument sorts before the second; a positive value (not necessarily +1) if the first arguments sorts after the second; and zero if the two values are equal.

share|improve this answer

The == operator does not work on the contents of strings because strings are effectively character pointers in this application, and the pointer get compared.

To compare the contents of strings use strcmp or strncmp.

share|improve this answer

You are comparing pointers (argv[i] and of "-n" are a char* and a const char*).

Use strcmp() instead.

share|improve this answer

What you're really doing here is pointer comparison. argv[i] is not a string, it's a pointer to a location in memory at which the actual string starts. Use strcmp().

share|improve this answer

You're comparing pointers, not string contents. argv[i] and "-n" are two different strings, stored at two different locations in memory, even if the characters inside the strings are equal.

share|improve this answer

In C, the operator == compares for equality.

Values of the same numeric type are compared the straightforward way (i.e. 2 + 2 == 4 is true).

Values of different integer (and non-integer numeric) types undergo some conversion. See elsewhere.

Pointers are equal if the point at the same address.

String literals are placed in memory not overlapping any other thing; including not overlapping anything pointed to by argv[i] (for i = 0 to argc).

So you're comparing two unequal pointers; that's why. You want to use if (!strcmp(argv[i], "-n")) { ... }.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.