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This question came to mind after seeing this simple piece of code:

if (!x%y)
{
    // do something
}

Maybe it's the influence of early C books (K&R?), but isn't the following always preferred, if not as cute?

if (x%y != 0)
{
    // do something
}
share|improve this question
3  
Absolutely, just be careful you get the logic right, as your first example is not equivalent to your second example. – Benjamin Lindley Nov 21 '10 at 18:44
1  
yeah, watch out for order-of-operations. – Charles Salvia Nov 21 '10 at 18:45
    
It makes no difference to the compiler and the generated code will be absolutely identical. Therefore you should write your source to be as clear to humans as possible. – Loki Astari Nov 21 '10 at 18:48
1  
@Martin: It does make a difference, because !x%y is parsed as (!x)%y :) – fredoverflow Nov 21 '10 at 18:55
1  
This sort of subjective discussion belongs on Programmers. – gnovice Nov 21 '10 at 18:58
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This quote answers your question.

"Debugging is twice as hard as writing the code in the first place. Therefore, if you write the code as cleverly as possible, you are, by definition, not smart enough to debug it." – Brian W. Kernighan

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No it doesn't. The OP isn't talking about coding "as cleverly as possible", rather, he's talking about this specific case of use of ! versus != 0. (Also, would it have been too difficult to actually put the quote here?) – Billy ONeal Nov 21 '10 at 18:49
    
I think (due to the title) that the OP is talking about cleverness versus brevity in general, and using the modulo expression as an example. – Charles Salvia Nov 21 '10 at 19:08
    
@Billy -- I think it does. Reading the question itself, it's clear that he's talking about being clever in general. The body of the post is just a specific example. Though I agree that he should just put the quote here, fixed. – Benjamin Lindley Nov 21 '10 at 19:08
    
Others answered similarly, and some even said that two code snipers are not the same (which is true). I mostly agree with Konerak. btw thanks PigBen. – BЈовић Nov 21 '10 at 19:13
3  
+1 for answering with a K&R quote, because in my view this is a direct result of K&R's C book. – Silly Kids Nov 21 '10 at 22:18

Are you sure about that code? !x%y means (!x)%y because !binds tighter than %.

(For that reason alone, I would prefer x % y != 0.)

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First of all, props to everyone noticing that (!x%y) is not equivalent to (!(x%y)), but more importantly, neither of them is equivalent to:

if (x % y != 0)

which has a much nicer form:

if (x % y)

Personally I try not to write ==0 when it can be replaced by use of ! without introducing excessive parentheses, and I absolutely never use !=0, but this is a discussion that will start flamewars. :-)

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3  
This. The zero is false, everything else true semantic is deeply embedded in c derived language and is extremely clear, but loose !'s take parsing. – dmckee Nov 22 '10 at 2:42
    
I sometimes use "!!" as a pseudo-operator to convert non-zero and zero to the values 1 and 0, respectively. I use "!!" sometimes in places where it isn't necessary, to emphasize that a numerical expression may return something other than 0 or 1, but non-zero values will be mapped to 1. I also use it when e.g. I want a function that returns an 'int' to return non-zero if a value of type 'long' is non-zero (without the "!!", the "int" might return zero even if the long was non-zero; actually, if the return type is signed, it might even trigger nasal demons). – supercat Nov 23 '10 at 23:34
    
@supercat: Yes, I do that too. People who are happy not supporting pre-C99 compilers might just write (bool) though. – R.. Nov 24 '10 at 1:24

Cleverness should be skipped. It isn't clever... or more importantly maintainable.

Shortcuts and brevity may or may not be acceptable: we all take shortcuts but there are almost "industry standard" shortcuts because we all do it. No clever shortcuts though

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Prefer clarity over brevity. The second example x % y != 0 is more clear.

Of course, what constitutes clarity is somewhat subjective, but I prefer to reserve the unary ! operator for boolean variables or functions returning boolean.

The way I usually try to gauge clarity as I write code is by asking myself: would I easily be able to read and understand this line if 1) someone else wrote it or 2) I had to read it again 2 years down the line.

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Clarity wins over brevity every day, in my opinion. I sometimes feel that writing code such as:

if(!(x = func(y)) && ++z == x)

...is the equivalent to go-faster stripes on a car. It may feel fast, but it isn't. I also don't think that using incomprehensible variable names (such as in the above example) to save on typing is a good idea.

What is better here:

for(int x(0) x < managers.size(); ++x)
    managers[x]->initialise();

or:

for(int mgr(0); mgr < managers.size(); ++mgr)
    managers[mgr]->initialise();

They both accomplish the same thing and one could argue that there's no point making mgr more clear (there's even other arguments to say mgr should be clearer :) ). But if ever this part of the routine gets more complicated, it might be very important:

for(int mgr(0); mgr < managers.size(); ++mgr)
{
    for(int dependentMgr(0); dependentMgr < managers[mgr].dependents().size(); ++dependentMgr)
    {
        // init these first
    }
}

Obviously, this is not a discussion on whether to use iterators or not, merely whether we should use clear names or not.

When I look at a piece of code I have not seen before, the variable names are everything. I cringe when I see tmp and tempt2 and vec2. They mean nothing.

Seriously people, if you're worrying about the amount you're typing, get an IDE with autocomplete or go raise chickens in Fiji :)

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1  
+1 go-faster stripes. Reminds me of the Simpsons' "speed holes" when Homer was getting shot. – Konerak Nov 21 '10 at 18:56

Actually, if you want your code to be self-documenting (Martin Fowler Style), you can use the more verbose:

every_player_gets_equal_points = x%y;
if (!every_player_gets_equal_points) { //Some players get more: now base on completion time
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The first code snippet you present, ...

if (!x%y)
{
    // do something
}

... is meaningless and therefore most likely incorrect, since !x%y is equivalent to !x except for the cases of y equals -1, 0, or 1, and in the y equals 0 case it's Undefined Behavior (i.e., %y is generally meaningless).

Others have already remarked that the first snippet is not equivalent to the second more verbose one. But then one could wonder which snippet expresses the intention. My point is that the first snippet is not equivalent to anything that is likely to be correct.

And so this illustrates nicely that clarity is a good idea.

Cheers & hth.,

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