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Well many times i have come acroos the common phase that its difficult to get all right that all wrong. Well i thought of working a bit on it and needless to say pretty much baffled , when i happen to come across the very same statement in a serial NUMB3RS, i m wondering how could that be true ? supposed if we take a MCQ ( multiple choice questions ) which usually comes with 4 options , in which one of them is right , then the probability of getting the right answer is 1/4 and the probability of getting a wrong answer would be 3/4 . Now if we have 10 questions , then the probability of getting all right would be (1/4)^10 . ? is that correct ? and the probability of getting a wrong answer would be (3/4)^10 ? if both my conjectures are true , wont that make the probability of getting all right make it much lesser than probability of all wrong.

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closed as off topic by John Kugelman, aioobe, Henk Holterman, Mark Byers, duffymo Nov 21 '10 at 19:43

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Closing as off-topic. And it's not the chance of getting "a" wrong answer but of getting all answers wrong. –  Henk Holterman Nov 21 '10 at 19:42

4 Answers 4

Yes, your reasoning is correct - if for each question the probability of guessing it correctly is less than the probability of guessing incorrectly then you are more likely to get all questions wrong than get them all right.

However it is typically the case that you are more likely to get at least one right than to get them all wrong - the former becoming more likely as the number of questions grows, and the latter becoming less likely.

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well i am pretty much surprised , cuz till now the serial NUMB3RS havent gone wrong so far. –  Rahul Nov 21 '10 at 19:42

Yes, you're exactly right. I'm not sure this belongs on Stack Overflow though ;)

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+1 for "not sure this belongs on Stack Overflow." I happen to be out of close votes for the day though. –  aaronasterling Nov 21 '10 at 19:42
    
well stack overflow has never disappointed me so far, beside i believe math has got strong nexus with computer science , we tend to use it one way or the another. –  Rahul Nov 21 '10 at 19:45

Well many times i have come acroos the common phase that its difficult to get all right that all wrong.

This is just true when you have something like yes / no questions. (Rework your math with a 50/50 probability of getting it right.)

Otherwise your reasoning makes sense.

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Yes, you are correct and I don't see anything wrong in the fact that getting 10 answers right when everyone has 0.25 probability of being chosen is lesser than the wrong ones.

Actually the explaination is that every choice is indipendent, so after having chosing a correct answer (1/4) you will have a new question for which you still have the probability of 1/4.

That's why you multiply them together, it's the same principle applied to successive die tosses.

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