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I am searching for solution for my script argument problem

Here it the thing:

I would like to start my script with:

./myscript.sh -d9 file_name

instead of 9, there could be any other number

Is there some function for dealing things like this?

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And what is the problem? How make your script accept ... -d<number_only> ...? – khachik Nov 21 '10 at 19:57
up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you're using the bash shell, take a look at the getopts built-in command. Type help getopts at the bash prompt to get information about it.

In short, it accepts a list of possible options and whether they take argument values, and it will return the next option to process in a pair of variables. Use it in a while loop to process all the options, and then you can also process the filename:

while getopts "d:" flag
do
  if [ "$flag" = "d" ]
  then
    D=$OPTARG
  fi
done
echo $D    # argument value you are looking for

shift $(($OPTIND - 1))
echo $1    # the file name after the parsed options
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Try using getopt:

$ getopt d: -d42 arg
-d 42 -- arg

The first parameter is a list of options (the colon means that the option takes an argument)

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getopt cannot handle arguments containing whitespace and is generally considered superseded by getopts. – jilles Nov 21 '10 at 22:52

In your example, $1 is "-d9" and $2 is "file_name".

$@ is "-d9 file_name" and if you ever go over 9, start using ${10}

Use regexes to find the values.

For instance:

if [[ $@ =~ "d (\d+)( |$)" ]]
share|improve this answer
    
@J V $0 is -d9 file_name??? – khachik Nov 21 '10 at 20:04
    
Oh crap, meant $@ :D – J V Nov 21 '10 at 20:09
    
That is ripe for false positives. – Dennis Williamson Nov 21 '10 at 22:09
    
How exactly? As far as I can tell, that regex handles the value perfectly... – J V Nov 21 '10 at 22:14

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