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What is an elegant way to find all the permutations of a string. E.g. ba, would be ba and ab, but what about abcdefgh? Is there any example Java implementation?

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There are lots of answers here: stackoverflow.com/questions/361/… –  Marek Sapota Nov 21 '10 at 20:25
    
this is a very popular question. you can take a look here: careercup.com/question?id=3861299 –  JJunior Nov 21 '10 at 20:46
2  
There is an assumption need to be mentioned. The characters are unique. For example, for a String "aaaa" there is just one answer. To have a more general answer, you can save the strings in a set to avoid duplication –  Afshin Moazami Dec 8 '12 at 18:12
1  
Is repetition of characters allowed, or is repetition of characters not allowed? Can a single string have multiple occurrences of the same character? –  Anderson Green May 22 '13 at 19:35
    
Read the theory (or if, like me, you're lazy, go to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permutation) and implement a real algorithm. Basically you can generate a sequence of orderings of elements (that fact that it's a string is irrelevant) and walk through the orderings until you get back to the start. Steer clear of anything that involves recursion or string manipulations. –  CurtainDog May 15 at 1:43
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19 Answers

up vote 137 down vote accepted
public static void permutation(String str) { 
    permutation("", str); 
}

private static void permutation(String prefix, String str) {
    int n = str.length();
    if (n == 0) System.out.println(prefix);
    else {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            permutation(prefix + str.charAt(i), str.substring(0, i) + str.substring(i+1, n));
    }
}

(via Introduction to Programming in Java)

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33  
Solution seems to be coming from here introcs.cs.princeton.edu/java/23recursion/… –  cyber-monk Aug 8 '12 at 16:05
15  
That's not rocket science, I came up with pretty much the same answer. Minor tweak: instead of recursing until n==0, you can stop a level earlier at n==1 and print out prefix + str. –  jpatokal Oct 23 '12 at 10:26
5  
str.substring(i+1, n) can be replace by str.substring(i) –  Afshin Moazami Dec 8 '12 at 18:07
7  
Elegant recursive solution. A comment or two in the code to explain what's going on would have been nice. –  Edward Falk May 4 '13 at 16:07
7  
@AfshinMoazami I think str.substring(i+1, n) can be replaced by str.substring(i+1). Using str.substring(i) will cause java.lang.StackOverflowError. –  Ayusman Aug 7 '13 at 7:25
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Use recursion.

  • Try each of the letters in turn as the first letter and then find all the permutations of the remaining letters using a recursive call.
  • The base case is when the input is an empty string the only permutation is the empty string.
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13  
Byer although superJulietta answer is accepted one, your answer made me understand the logic/algo. thanx –  Edge Aug 4 '12 at 12:03
2  
Upvoted for the explanation. Better than only code. –  Manish Malik Oct 21 '13 at 16:55
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Here is my solution that is based on the idea of the book "Cracking the Coding Interview" (P54):

/**
 * List permutation of a string
 * 
 * @param s the input string
 * @return  the list of permutation
 */
public static ArrayList<String> permutation(String s) {
    // The result
    ArrayList<String> res = new ArrayList<String>();
    // If input string's length is 1, return {s}
    if (s.length() == 1) {
        res.add(s);
    } else if (s.length() > 1) {
        int lastIndex = s.length() - 1;
        // Find out the last character
        String last = s.substring(lastIndex);
        // Rest of the string
        String rest = s.substring(0, lastIndex);
        // Perform permutation on the rest string and
        // merge with the last character
        res = merge(permutation(rest), last);
    }
    return res;
}

/**
 * @param list a result of permutation, e.g. {"ab", "ba"}
 * @param c    the last character
 * @return     a merged new list, e.g. {"cab", "acb" ... }
 */
public static ArrayList<String> merge(ArrayList<String> list, String c) {
    ArrayList<String> res = new ArrayList<String>();
    // Loop through all the string in the list
    for (String s : list) {
        // For each string, insert the last character to all possible postions
        // and add them to the new list
        for (int i = 0; i <= s.length(); ++i) {
            String ps = new StringBuffer(s).insert(i, c).toString();
            res.add(ps);
        }
    }
    return res;
}

Running output of string "abcd":

  • Step 1: Merge [a] and b: [ba, ab]

  • Step 2: Merge [ba, ab] and c: [cba, bca, bac, cab, acb, abc]

  • Step 3: Merge [cba, bca, bac, cab, acb, abc] and d: [dcba, cdba, cbda, cbad, dbca, bdca, bcda, bcad, dbac, bdac, badc, bacd, dcab, cdab, cadb, cabd, dacb, adcb, acdb, acbd, dabc, adbc, abdc, abcd]

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Of all the solutions given here and in other forums, i liked Mark Byers the most. That description actually made me think and code it myself. Too bad i cannot voteup his solution as i am newbie. Anyways here is my implementation of his description

public class PermTest {

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    String str = "abcdef";
    StringBuffer strBuf = new StringBuffer(str);
    doPerm(strBuf,str.length());

}

private static void doPerm(StringBuffer str, int index){

    if(index <= 0)
        System.out.println(str);            
    else { //recursively solve this by placing all other chars at current first pos
        doPerm(str, index-1);
        int currPos = str.length()-index;
        for (int i = currPos+1; i < str.length(); i++) {//start swapping all other chars with current first char
            swap(str,currPos, i);
            doPerm(str, index-1);
            swap(str,i, currPos);//restore back my string buffer
        }
    }
}

private  static void swap(StringBuffer str, int pos1, int pos2){
    char t1 = str.charAt(pos1);
    str.setCharAt(pos1, str.charAt(pos2));
    str.setCharAt(pos2, t1);
} 
}   

I prefer this solution ahead of the first one in this thread because this solution uses StringBuffer.I wouldn't say my solution doesn't create any temporary string (it actually does in system.out.println where the toString() of StringBuffer is called). But i just feel this is better than the first solution where too many string literals are created . May be some performance guy out there can evalute this in terms of 'memory' (for 'time' it already lags due to that extra 'swap')

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2  
Down Voter care to explain? Fan boys everywhere. Ahh I see the fanboy downvoted almost all other low reputed answers on Nov 13. –  srikanth yaradla Nov 18 '13 at 11:57
1  
+1 for a decent solution. Don't know why this was downvoted. –  codingscientist Nov 28 '13 at 6:03
1  
Found it easier to understand, than the top voted answer. Doesn't make sense to compromise 'ease of understanding' for elegance. –  asloob Feb 28 at 15:48
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This one is without recursion

public static void permute(String s) {
    if(null==s || s.isEmpty()) {
        return;
    }

    // List containing words formed in each iteration 
    List<String> strings = new LinkedList<String>();
    strings.add(String.valueOf(s.charAt(0))); // add the first element to the list

     // Temp list that holds the set of strings for 
     //  appending the current character to all position in each word in the original list
    List<String> tempList = new LinkedList<String>(); 

    for(int i=1; i< s.length(); i++) {

        for(int j=0; j<strings.size(); j++) {
            tempList.addAll(merge(s.charAt(i), strings.get(j)));
                        }
        strings.removeAll(strings);
        strings.addAll(tempList);

        tempList.removeAll(tempList);

    }

    for(int i=0; i<strings.size(); i++) {
        System.out.println(strings.get(i));
    }
}

/**
 * helper method that appends the given character at each position in the given string 
 * and returns a set of such modified strings 
 * - set removes duplicates if any(in case a character is repeated)
 */
private static Set<String> merge(Character c,  String s) {
    if(s==null || s.isEmpty()) {
        return null;
    }

    int len = s.length();
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    Set<String> list = new HashSet<String>();

    for(int i=0; i<= len; i++) {
        sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.append(s.substring(0, i) + c + s.substring(i, len));
        list.add(sb.toString());
    }

    return list;
}
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Here is a straightforward minimalist recursive solution in Java:

public static ArrayList<String> permutations(String s) {
    ArrayList<String> out = new ArrayList<String>();
    if (s.length() == 1) {
        out.add(s);
        return out;
    }
    char first = s.charAt(0);
    String rest = s.substring(1);
    for (String permutation : permutations(rest)) {
        out.addAll(insertAtAllPositions(first, permutation));
    }
    return out;
}
public static ArrayList<String> insertAtAllPositions(char ch, String s) {
    ArrayList<String> out = new ArrayList<String>();
    for (int i = 0; i <= s.length(); ++i) {
        String inserted = s.substring(0, i) + ch + s.substring(i);
        out.add(inserted);
    }
    return out;
}
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A very basic solution in Java is to use recursion + Set ( to avoid repetitions ) if you want to store and return the solution strings :

public static Set<String> generatePerm(String input)
{
    Set<String> set = new HashSet<String>();
    if (input == "")
        return set;

    Character a = input.charAt(0);

    if (input.length() > 1)
    {
        input = input.substring(1);

        Set<String> permSet = generatePerm(input);

        for (String x : permSet)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i <= x.length(); i++)
            {
                set.add(x.substring(0, i) + a + x.substring(i));
            }
        }
    }
    else
    {
        set.add(a + "");
    }
    return set;
}
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//Rotate and create words beginning with all letter possible and push to stack 1

//Read from stack1 and for each word create words with other letters at the next location by rotation and so on 

/*  eg : man

    1. push1 - man, anm, nma
    2. pop1 - nma ,  push2 - nam,nma
       pop1 - anm ,  push2 - amn,anm
       pop1 - man ,  push2 - mna,man
*/

public class StringPermute {

    static String str;
    static String word;
    static int top1 = -1;
    static int top2 = -1;
    static String[] stringArray1;
    static String[] stringArray2;
    static int strlength = 0;

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        System.out.println("Enter String : ");
        InputStreamReader isr = new InputStreamReader(System.in);
        BufferedReader bfr = new BufferedReader(isr);
        str = bfr.readLine();
        word = str;
        strlength = str.length();
        int n = 1;
        for (int i = 1; i <= strlength; i++) {
            n = n * i;
        }
        stringArray1 = new String[n];
        stringArray2 = new String[n];
        push(word, 1);
        doPermute();
        display();
    }

    public static void push(String word, int x) {
        if (x == 1)
            stringArray1[++top1] = word;
        else
            stringArray2[++top2] = word;
    }

    public static String pop(int x) {
        if (x == 1)
            return stringArray1[top1--];
        else
            return stringArray2[top2--];
    }

    public static void doPermute() {

        for (int j = strlength; j >= 2; j--)
            popper(j);

    }

    public static void popper(int length) {
        // pop from stack1 , rotate each word n times and push to stack 2
        if (top1 > -1) {
            while (top1 > -1) {
                word = pop(1);
                for (int j = 0; j < length; j++) {
                    rotate(length);
                    push(word, 2);
                }
            }
        }
        // pop from stack2 , rotate each word n times w.r.t position and push to
        // stack 1
        else {
            while (top2 > -1) {
                word = pop(2);
                for (int j = 0; j < length; j++) {
                    rotate(length);
                    push(word, 1);
                }
            }
        }

    }

    public static void rotate(int position) {
        char[] charstring = new char[100];
        for (int j = 0; j < word.length(); j++)
            charstring[j] = word.charAt(j);

        int startpos = strlength - position;
        char temp = charstring[startpos];
        for (int i = startpos; i < strlength - 1; i++) {
            charstring[i] = charstring[i + 1];
        }
        charstring[strlength - 1] = temp;
        word = new String(charstring).trim();
    }

    public static void display() {
        int top;
        if (top1 > -1) {
            while (top1 > -1)
                System.out.println(stringArray1[top1--]);
        } else {
            while (top2 > -1)
                System.out.println(stringArray2[top2--]);
        }
    }
}
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Let's use input abc as an example.

Start off with just the last element (c) in a set (["c"]), then add the second last element (b) to its front, end and every possible positions in the middle, making it ["bc", "cb"] and then in the same manner it will add the next element from the back (a) to each string in the set making it:

"a" + "bc" = ["abc", "bac", "bca"]  and  "a" + "cb" = ["acb" ,"cab", "cba"] 

Thus entire permutation:

["abc", "bac", "bca","acb" ,"cab", "cba"]

Code:

public class Test 
{
    static Set<String> permutations;
    static Set<String> result = new HashSet<String>();

    public static Set<String> permutation(String string) {
        permutations = new HashSet<String>();

        int n = string.length();
        for (int i = n - 1; i >= 0; i--) 
        {
            shuffle(string.charAt(i));
        }
        return permutations;
    }

    private static void shuffle(char c) {
        if (permutations.size() == 0) {
            permutations.add(String.valueOf(c));
        } else {
            Iterator<String> it = permutations.iterator();
            for (int i = 0; i < permutations.size(); i++) {

                String temp1;
                for (; it.hasNext();) {
                    temp1 = it.next();
                    for (int k = 0; k < temp1.length() + 1; k += 1) {
                        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(temp1);

                        sb.insert(k, c);

                        result.add(sb.toString());
                    }
                }
            }
            permutations = result;
            //'result' has to be refreshed so that in next run it doesn't contain stale values.
            result = new HashSet<String>();
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Set<String> result = permutation("abc");

        System.out.println("\nThere are total of " + result.size() + " permutations:");
        Iterator<String> it = result.iterator();
        while (it.hasNext()) {
            System.out.println(it.next());
        }
    }
}
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import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class hello {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        hello h = new hello();
        h.printcomp();
    }
      int fact=1;
    public void factrec(int a,int k){
        if(a>=k)
        {fact=fact*k;
        k++;
        factrec(a,k);
        }
        else
        {System.out.println("The string  will have "+fact+" permutations");
        }
        }
    public void printcomp(){
        String str;
        int k;
        Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
        System.out.println("enter the string whose permutations has to b found");
        str=in.next();
        k=str.length();
        factrec(k,1);
        String[] arr =new String[fact];
        char[] array = str.toCharArray();
        while(p<fact)
        printcomprec(k,array,arr);
            // if incase u need array containing all the permutation use this
            //for(int d=0;d<fact;d++)         
        //System.out.println(arr[d]);
    }
    int y=1;
    int p = 0;
    int g=1;
    int z = 0;
    public void printcomprec(int k,char array[],String arr[]){
        for (int l = 0; l < k; l++) {
            for (int b=0;b<k-1;b++){
            for (int i=1; i<k-g; i++) {
                char temp;
                String stri = "";
                temp = array[i];
                array[i] = array[i + g];
                array[i + g] = temp;
                for (int j = 0; j < k; j++)
                    stri += array[j];
                arr[z] = stri;
                System.out.println(arr[z] + "   " + p++);
                z++;
            }
            }
            char temp;
            temp=array[0];
            array[0]=array[y];
            array[y]=temp;
            if (y >= k-1)
                y=y-(k-1);
            else
                y++;
        }
        if (g >= k-1)
            g=1;
        else
            g++;
    }

}
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/** Returns an array list containing all
 * permutations of the characters in s. */
public static ArrayList<String> permute(String s) {
    ArrayList<String> perms = new ArrayList<>();
    int slen = s.length();
    if (slen > 0) {
        // Add the first character from s to the perms array list.
        perms.add(Character.toString(s.charAt(0)));

        // Repeat for all additional characters in s.
        for (int i = 1;  i < slen;  ++i) {

            // Get the next character from s.
            char c = s.charAt(i);

            // For each of the strings currently in perms do the following:
            int size = perms.size();
            for (int j = 0;  j < size;  ++j) {

                // 1. remove the string
                String p = perms.remove(0);
                int plen = p.length();

                // 2. Add plen + 1 new strings to perms.  Each new string
                //    consists of the removed string with the character c
                //    inserted into it at a unique location.
                for (int k = 0;  k <= plen;  ++k) {
                    perms.add(p.substring(0, k) + c + p.substring(k));
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return perms;
}
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/*
     * eg: abc =>{a,bc},{b,ac},{c,ab}
     * =>{ca,b},{cb,a}
     * =>cba,cab
     * =>{ba,c},{bc,a}
     * =>bca,bac
     * =>{ab,c},{ac,b}
     * =>acb,abc
     */
    public void nonRecpermute(String prefix, String word)
    {
        String[] currentstr ={prefix,word};
        Stack<String[]> stack = new Stack<String[]>();
        stack.add(currentstr);
        while(!stack.isEmpty())
        {
            currentstr = stack.pop();
            String currentPrefix = currentstr[0];
            String currentWord = currentstr[1];
            if(currentWord.equals(""))
            {
                System.out.println("Word ="+currentPrefix);
            }
            for(int i=0;i<currentWord.length();i++)
            {
                String[] newstr = new String[2];
                newstr[0]=currentPrefix + String.valueOf(currentWord.charAt(i));
                newstr[1] = currentWord.substring(0, i);
                if(i<currentWord.length()-1)
                {
                    newstr[1] = newstr[1]+currentWord.substring(i+1);
                }
                stack.push(newstr);
            }

        }

    }
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This can be done iteratively by simply inserting each letter of the string in turn in all locations of the previous partial results.

We start with [A], which with B becomes [BA, AB], and with C, [CBA, BCA, BAC, CAB, etc].

The running time would be O(n!), which, for the test case ABCD, is 1 x 2 x 3 x 4.

In the above product, the 1 is for A, the 2 is for B, etc.

Dart sample:

void main() {

  String insertAt(String a, String b, int index)
  {
    return a.substring(0, index) + b + a.substring(index);
  }

  List<String> Permute(String word) {

    var letters = word.split('');

    var p_list = [ letters.first ];

    for (var c in letters.sublist(1)) {

      var new_list = [ ];

      for (var p in p_list)
        for (int i = 0; i <= p.length; i++)
          new_list.add(insertAt(p, c, i));

      p_list = new_list;
    }

    return p_list;
  }

  print(Permute("ABCD"));

}
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We can use factorial to find how many strings started with particular letter.

Example: take the input abcd. (3!) == 6 strings will start with every letter of abcd.

static public int facts(int x){
    int sum = 1;
    for (int i = 1; i < x; i++) {
        sum *= (i+1);
    }
    return sum;
}

public static void permutation(String str) {
    char[] str2 = str.toCharArray();
    int n = str2.length;
    int permutation = 0;
    if (n == 1) {
        System.out.println(str2[0]);
    } else if (n == 2) {
        System.out.println(str2[0] + "" + str2[1]);
        System.out.println(str2[1] + "" + str2[0]);
    } else {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            if (true) {
                char[] str3 = str.toCharArray();
                char temp = str3[i];
                str3[i] = str3[0];
                str3[0] = temp;
                str2 = str3;
            }

            for (int j = 1, count = 0; count < facts(n-1); j++, count++) {
                if (j != n-1) {
                    char temp1 = str2[j+1];
                    str2[j+1] = str2[j];
                    str2[j] = temp1;
                } else {
                    char temp1 = str2[n-1];
                    str2[n-1] = str2[1];
                    str2[1] = temp1;
                    j = 1;
                } // end of else block
                permutation++;
                System.out.print("permutation " + permutation + " is   -> ");
                for (int k = 0; k < n; k++) {
                    System.out.print(str2[k]);
                } // end of loop k
                System.out.println();
            } // end of loop j
        } // end of loop i
    }
}
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//insert each character into an arraylist

static ArrayList al = new ArrayList();

private static void findPermutation (String str){
    for (int k = 0; k < str.length(); k++) {
        addOneChar(str.charAt(k));
    }
}

//insert one char into ArrayList
private static void addOneChar(char ch){
    String lastPerStr;
    String tempStr;
    ArrayList locAl = new ArrayList();
    for (int i = 0; i < al.size(); i ++ ){
        lastPerStr = al.get(i).toString();
        //System.out.println("lastPerStr: " + lastPerStr);
        for (int j = 0; j <= lastPerStr.length(); j++) {
            tempStr = lastPerStr.substring(0,j) + ch + 
                    lastPerStr.substring(j, lastPerStr.length());
            locAl.add(tempStr);
            //System.out.println("tempStr: " + tempStr);
        }
    }
    if(al.isEmpty()){
        al.add(ch);
    } else {
        al.clear();
        al = locAl;
    }
}

private static void printArrayList(ArrayList al){
    for (int i = 0; i < al.size(); i++) {
        System.out.print(al.get(i) + "  ");
    }
}
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I don't find this answer useful as it contains no explanation and it uses the same algorithm as a few other answers that do provide an explanation. –  Dukeling Jun 8 at 15:56
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Improved Code for the same

    static String permutationStr[];
    static int indexStr = 0;

    static int factorial (int i) {
        if (i == 1)
            return 1;
        else
            return i * factorial(i-1);
    }

    public static void permutation(String str) {
        char strArr[] = str.toLowerCase().toCharArray();
        java.util.Arrays.sort(strArr);

        int count = 1, dr = 1;
        for (int i = 0; i < strArr.length-1; i++){
            if ( strArr[i] == strArr[i+1]) {
                count++;
            } else {
                dr *= factorial(count);
                count = 1;
            }       
        }
        dr *= factorial(count);

        count = factorial(strArr.length) / dr;

        permutationStr = new String[count];

        permutation("", str);

        for (String oneStr : permutationStr){
            System.out.println(oneStr);
        }
    }

    private static void permutation(String prefix, String str) {
        int n = str.length();
        if (n == 0) {
            for (int i = 0; i < indexStr; i++){
                if(permutationStr[i].equals(prefix))
                    return;
            }        
            permutationStr[indexStr++] = prefix;
        } else {
            for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
                permutation(prefix + str.charAt(i), str.substring(0, i) + str.substring(i + 1, n));
            }
        }
    }
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check output for "aabbccccd" –  GauravDS Jul 13 '13 at 2:23
    
No explanation? And it's presumably not all that different from one of the other two factorial algorithms presented here. –  Dukeling Jun 8 at 16:06
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import java.io.*;
public class Anagram {

public static void main(String[] args) {
      java.util.Scanner sc=new java.util.Scanner(System.in);
            PrintWriter p=new PrintWriter(System.out,true);
            p.println("Enter Word");
            String a[],s="",st;boolean flag=true;
            int in[],n,nf=1,i,j=0,k,m=0;
            char l[];
            st=sc.next();
            p.println("Anagrams");
            p.println("1 . "+st);
            l=st.toCharArray();
            n=st.length();
            for(i=1;i<=n;i++){
                nf*=i;
            }

            i=1;
            a=new String[nf];
            in=new int[n];
            a[0]=st;
            while(i<nf){
                for(m=0;m<n;m++){
                    in[m]=n;
                }j=0;
                while(j<n){
                    k=(int)(n*Math.random());

                    for(m=0;m<=j;m++){
                        if(k==in[m]){
                            flag=false;
                            break;          
                        }
                    }
                    if(flag==true){
                        in[j++]=k;
                    }flag=true;
                }s="";
                for(j=0;j<n;j++){
                    s+=l[in[j]];
                }

                //Removing same words
                for(m=0;m<=i;m++){
                        if(s.equalsIgnoreCase(a[m])){
                            flag=false;
                            break;          
                        }
                    }
                    if(flag==true){
                        a[i++]=s;
                        p.println(i+" . "+a[i-1]);
                    }flag=true;

            }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have permutated it. It was all about random collection of indices of a word so I did it with Math.random() function. No need of recursion or any other technique. –  Niskarsh Kumar Feb 18 at 7:59
    
Doesn't work - runs indefinitely on input aa. Unique random generation seems overcomplicated / inefficient, and no explanation provided in the answer (the comment is a start, but more information should be provided). –  Dukeling Jun 8 at 14:26
add comment

//Loop thro' the entire character array and keep 'i' as the basis of your permutation and keep finding the combination like you swap [ab, ba]

public class Permutation {
    //Act as a queue
    private List<Character> list;
    //To remove the duplicates
    private Set<String> set = new HashSet<String>();

    public Permutation(String s) {
        list = new LinkedList<Character>();
        int len = s.length();
        for(int i = 0; i < len; i++) {
            list.add(s.charAt(i));
        }
    }

    public List<String> getStack(Character c, List<Character> list) {
        LinkedList<String> stack = new LinkedList<String>();
        stack.add(""+c);
        for(Character ch: list) {
            stack.add(""+ch);
        }

        return stack;
    }

    public String printCombination(String s1, String s2) {
        //S1 will be a single character
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        String[] strArr = s2.split(",");
        for(String s: strArr) {
            sb.append(s).append(s1);
            sb.append(",");
        }       
        for(String s: strArr) {
            sb.append(s1).append(s);
            sb.append(",");
        }

        return sb.toString();
    }

    public void printPerumtation() {
        int cnt = list.size();

        for(int i = 0; i < cnt; i++) {
            Character c = list.get(0);
            list.remove(0);
            List<String> stack = getStack(c, list);

            while(stack.size() > 1) {
                //Remove the top two elements
                String s2 = stack.remove(stack.size() - 1);
                String s1 = stack.remove(stack.size() - 1);
                String comS = printCombination(s1, s2);
                stack.add(comS);
            }

            String[] perms = (stack.remove(0)).split(",");
            for(String perm: perms) {
                set.add(perm);
            }

            list.add(c);
        }

        for(String s: set) {
            System.out.println(s);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I won't give you a direct answer. Have some tests instead. This is a perfect example question for test-driven development...

Given

public List<Character> jumble(String characters) ...

Implement it such that these tests pass. Do the tests in order, one at a time. Make sure the first tests continue to pass when you do subsequent ones. Refactor as you go

Assert.assertTrue(jumble().isEmpty());
// this first one should have been very easy, just return an empty list
Assert.assertEquals(Arrays.asList("a"), jumble("a"));
// this one is easy too, just return the input string in a list and it will work
Assert.assertEquals(Arrays.asList("ab", "ba"), jumble("ab"));
// now it has started to get a bit harder, return a list with the input string normally and reversed
Assert.assertEquals(Arrays.asList("abc", "acb", "bac", "bca", "cab", "cba"), jumble("abc"));
// with the above you need to start treating the characters separately.
// Try building upon the existing solution so that you break down this problem recursively...
Assert.assertEquals(Arrays.asList("abb", "abb", "bab", "bba", "bab", "bba"), jumble("abb"));
// or, instead of the one above, you might want to test for ...
Assert.assertEquals(Arrays.asList("abb", "bab", "bba"), jumble("abb"));
// depending upon whether one 'b' is the same as another.
// (in which case the return type should probably be Set<Character>, not List<Character>

If you get these tests to pass, without assuming the length of the input in your algorithm, you should be OK for much larger strings.

share|improve this answer
1  
Downvoted because I didn't directly answer the question? This question is most likely homework ... –  Synesso Nov 21 '10 at 22:03
12  
The question is "what is an elegant way to find the permutations". Making the OP implement it himself is not going to result in an elegant solution. It's ok to not answer the question directly, but at least discuss how to get to a good solution. –  Franci Penov Nov 24 '10 at 5:48
4  
And seeing how the OP has 5K of rep, it's highly unlikely this is actually a homework question the OP wouldn't be able to implement himself. :-) –  Franci Penov Nov 24 '10 at 5:49
5  
Downvoted because the question is about the algo and not tdd. Also tdd cannot be used to develop an algo, but rather an implementation –  Nils Jul 8 '11 at 9:08
1  
That's what Franci said 2.5 years ago. However, all the points were for spurious questions asked, no answers given. –  Synesso Apr 23 '13 at 12:35
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