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One of the .jar files I am using only works with the 32-bit java virtual machine on windows. I installed the 32bit versions of eclipse and the jdk but it is still getting the same error. What commands would I use in the run configuration to specify 32-bit virtual machine for running the application that uses this .jar file?

-vm C:\Program Files (x86)\Java\jre6\bin\javaw.exe

doesn't work. Any ideas?

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If the parameter to -vm contains spaces you need to put it in double quotes. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 21 '10 at 22:10
    
What is the error message? –  Matt Solnit Nov 21 '10 at 22:12
    
the problem is that System.getProperty("os.arch") is reporting amd64 –  Tamas Nov 21 '10 at 22:24
    
Please revise your question to accurately reflect what you are actually asking. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 22 '10 at 9:49

3 Answers 3

There are TWO JVM's in action when developing with Eclipse. One running Eclipse itself, and the other one used for your program.

Unless you are talking about a plugin, it is the latter you need to worry about. Remove the -vm option so Eclipse starts with the default JRE. Then go to Preferences -> Java -> Installed JRE's and add your 32 bit Java installation and set it to be default (this is the trick).

If the JVM used by your applications change, you are done.

If not, you should start with a new workspace, add the 32-bit JVM and create your projects as before.

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My problem is that String arch = System.getProperty("os.arch"); is reporting that I have a 64 bit version. Even after I added the 32 bit jre to installed jvms (like above) it still reports amd64 –  Tamas Nov 21 '10 at 22:18
    
os.arch reflects the Windows architecture, not the JVM architecture. Why is this important? Does code which you can't edit depend on this? –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 21 '10 at 22:33
    
yes unfortunately...if the os.arch is amd64 than it'll load the 64bit version of itself that doesn't exist –  Tamas Nov 21 '10 at 22:39
    
Then fix the code deciding what to import. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Nov 22 '10 at 9:48

Take a look at this page:

http://wiki.eclipse.org/FAQ_How_do_I_run_Eclipse%3F

If you specify your VM within the eclipe.ini it have to be in a special line (I think).

Did you change you installed VMs?

Window -> Preferences -> Java -> Installed JREs

There can be the 64bit VM.

With the -vm parameter you specify the JRE to start Eclipse. With the installed VMs you specify the VM to run you code.

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My problem is that String arch = System.getProperty("os.arch"); is reporting that I have a 64 bit version. Even after I added the 32 bit jre to installed jvms (like above) it still reports amd64 –  Tamas Nov 21 '10 at 22:22

The are a lot of version of the virtual machine so let's go by all of them:

JRE 32 bit, JRE 64 bit, JDK 32 bit, JDK 64 bit.

If you have a 64 bit OS, you should be able to all of them and that's what I have installed in my machine, but there's an order you have to follow, the order I just described, first JRE 32 bit, then JRE 64, JDK32, JDK64. Other orders of installation may cause problems. Just in case, I'd recommend you to remove every virtual machine you have installed (JavaRa makes it easier: http://singularlabs.com/software/javara/javara-download/ ) and then proceed to the installation in the order described.

There are some reasons you wanna run a 32 bit Eclipse even if you have a 64 bit OS and one of them is that there are some suites and tools that do not support the 64 bit version.

Don't forget to set: JAVA_HOME: .;JDK32 PATH\bin;JDK64 PATH\bin

PATH: .;JDK32 PATH\bin;JDK64 PATH\bin

It's always good to put the .; first in the value of your new environment variables

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