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I have a Ruby program that runs fine on Linux. I'm trying it out on Windows 7 right now, and it should be fine since it only uses two libraries that installed without issues.

The error I'm getting is related to my own code. I have a file called config.rb, which has a class named Config. It has some values that you can change. Sounds pretty harmless.

However, I'm unable to require this class. Ruby gems custom require (i dont use gems at all) is not finding my file. What is going on here?

<internal:lib/rubygems/custom_require>:29:in `require': no such file to load -- config (LoadError)
    from <internal:lib/rubygems/custom_require>:29:in `require'
    from apitester.rb:9:in `<main>'

On line 9 of apitester.rb I have:

require 'config'

and config.rb is that simple class, in the same folder.

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1 Answer 1

Try with the following in Ruby 1.8:

require File.join(File.dirname(__FILE__), 'config')

or if you are using in Ruby 1.9:

require_relative 'config'
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this sort of works, great to know that ruby makes a variabled named Config so you can't name a class Config with a bunch of class variables. really lame. –  asdas Nov 21 '10 at 22:33
    
why do i need 2 different requires based on 2 versions of ruby?? this really blows –  asdas Nov 21 '10 at 22:33
    
You don't need, 1.9 just offers its own function for a common idiom... –  hurikhan77 Nov 21 '10 at 23:33
    
"why do i need 2 different requires based on 2 versions of ruby?? this really blows" Because Ruby continues to be actively developed and is being modified to provide better security. Would you rather it remain the same so you can continue to have security flaws? –  the Tin Man Nov 21 '10 at 23:53
    
"great to know that ruby makes a variabled named Config so you can't name a class Config with a bunch of class variables. really lame." Ruby doesn't have a variable named "Config". Perhaps something you loaded defined that name? And maybe Ruby or Gems was trying to tell you that you were doing something wrong and used the "Config" that you defined in the error message to try to help you? –  the Tin Man Nov 21 '10 at 23:57

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