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I am learning C++ and I am stuck with a problem. I need a way to use a specific subclass within base class. Does it make sense or I am using a wrong approach? SelectBrand should select the subclass, how can I do it?

Here below my simplified classes:


-----
class Protocol {

public:

    Protocol() {};
    ~Protocol() {};
    int openPort();
    int readPort(char *buffer);

.....

private:

        Protocol (const Protocol&);
};

int Protocol::openPort() {......};

int Protocol::readPort() {.........};

/***********************************************************************************/

class Device{

public:

        Device(Protocol& port):_protocol(port){}
        ~Device();
        virtual int getEvent(char *buffer) { return -1; }
        int Device::selectBrand();

        ..............

protected:

        Protocol& _protocol;

private:

        int brand;
        Device(const Device&orig);
};

Device::~Device() {}

int Device::selectBrand() {

       ......

       switch (X)

            case 1:

                    "use subclass Brand_B"

            case 2:

                    "use subclass Brand_B"

        .......

}

/***********************************************************************************/

class Brand_A:public Device {

public:

        Brand_A(Protocol& port);
        ~Brand_A();
        int getEvent(void *rawData);  

private:

        Brand_A(const Brand_A&);
};

Brand_A::Brand_A(Protocol& port):Device(port) {}

Brand_A::~Brand_A() {}

int Brand_A::getEvent(void *rawData) {


            .... readPort(......);

}

/***********************************************************************************/

class Brand_B:public Device {

public:

        Brand_B(Protocol& port);
        ~Brand_B();
        int getEvent(void *rawData);  

private:

        Brand_B(const Brand_B&);

};

Brand_B::Brand_B(Protocol& port):Device(port) {}

Brand_B::~Brand_B() {}

int Brand_B::getEvent(void *rawData) {


            .... readPort(......);

}

/* main **********************************************************/

int main(int argc, char **argv) {

        Device *mydev;

        char *buffer;

    ..............

    mydev->selectBrand();

    ..........

    mydev->getEvent(buffer);

    ...........

}
share|improve this question
    
There are way too many .... sections in your example. It's not clear what selectBrand actually does: what is X and what do you mean by "use subclass"? –  casablanca Nov 21 '10 at 22:38
    
If by "selecting" you're planning to downcast a an object to "get" a subclass, then yes, your approach is flawed. I think providing so much code is confusing - how about just the key classes, methods and how you want to use them? –  belwood Nov 21 '10 at 22:43
    
~Device() should probably be virtual. –  fredoverflow Nov 21 '10 at 23:18

5 Answers 5

This is not a good idea.

Generally the answer is dynamic_cast, but invoking specific behavior of descendants from a base class is usually a bad design sign.

You can try inverting the class hierarchy and using templates.

share|improve this answer

I figured I should flesh out the comment I made above. First of all, you can check out the Wikipedia page for more information on the abstract factory pattern. Basically it allows you to access different implementations of an interface, with the implementation used determined at runtime. However, you still don't know which implementation you're getting as that is decided in the factory method that returns the implementation of the interface. As a result, you can only ever use the members in the interface and not a specific implementation. An example that uses your classes above would be something like:

class Device
{
    virtual int getEvent(void *rawData) = 0;
}

class BrandA : public Device
{
    // define constructors/destructors etc.

    int getEvent(void *rawData)
    {
        // BrandA's implementation for getEvent
    }
}

class BrandB : public Device
{
    // define constructors/destructors etc.

    int getEvent(void *rawData)
    {
        // BrandB's implementation for getEvent
    }
}

class DeviceFactory
{
    static Device *CreateDevice(/*any parameters for determining the device?*/)
    {
        // You probably don't want to randomly determine which implementation you use...
        if ((rand() % 2) == 0)
        {
            return new BrandA();
        }
        else
        {
            return new BrandB();
        }
    }
}

int main()
{
    // CreateDevice will decide which type of device we use, however we can only
    // explicitly reference the members of the base class (Device).
    Device *myDevice = DeviceFactory::CreateDevice();

    myDevice->getEvent();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes - assuming I've understood the requirements in the question, this is definitely the right way to go about it. In particular, the base class knows nothing about the classes that inherit from it, which is always a sign that things are going right :-) –  psmears Dec 30 '10 at 22:58

It looks like you might be trying to implement something like polymorphism when C++ will do that for you. If you define virtual methods in your base class and override them in your sub classes, calls to those methods on a pointer or reference to the base type should result in the sub class' implementation being called.

For example:

class BaseClass
{
    virtual void DoSomething()
    {
        printf("base");
    }

};

class SubClass : public BaseClass
{
    void DoSomething()
    {
        printf("sub");
    }
};

int main()
{
    BaseClass *myBase = new SubClass();
    myBase->DoSomething(); // should print "sub" to stdout

    return 0;
}

You have to know what derived type (type of subclass) you want to use when you create it so that the instance has the added functionality of the derived type. If you don't, all you get is the functionality of the base class, and you cannot treat it as anything but the base class (or anything further up the inheritance hierarchy if your base class inherits from something).

You may even want to use a member to differentiate between different instances if they're not actually doing anything different. It's hard to tell from the code example exactly what you want to do. Maybe a more specific example of what you're trying to achieve rather than how you're trying to achieve it would help.

share|improve this answer
    
My problem is in the main I don't know which subclass I have to use. This is demand to a function in the base class which I called selectBrand. Base on some checks then code will use subclass barnd_a or brand_b. –  Luke Nov 22 '10 at 9:13
    
BaseClass *myBase = new SubClass(); would be perfect....but if I have have more Subclass to select? –  Luke Nov 22 '10 at 9:14
    
After reading your second post I think I understand the issue a little better. If you are trying to use different implementations of methods that are declared in the base class, without knowing which one you're using, you probably want the abstract factory pattern. Something like: Device *device = Devices::CreateDevice(); where Device is an interface class that declares the common methods of devices, and the instance returned is a specific device determined by CreateDevice(). –  ajmccluskey Nov 22 '10 at 22:25
    
Thanks for the sample implementation. –  Luke Nov 23 '10 at 9:33

please, let me reformulate the problem. I have 1 baseClass and some subclasses; Brand_A....Brand_N

Now, in the main() I don't know in advance which subclass I will use; this selection is demanded to a function in the baseClass which I called selectBrand. What I need is a mechanism to select and use the right subclass based on internal conditions. I want to masquerade to the main() the selected subclass. How to get this?

share|improve this answer

I implemented and tested this code; it works fine. Is it good design or can be done better?

class BehaviorBase
{
public:
    virtual ~BehaviorBase() {}
    virtual void DoSomethingOn(Object* obj) {}
};

class Object
{
public:
    BehaviorBase* behavior;
    void DoSomething();
    void ChangeBehavior(int param);
    ~Object();
}

class BehaviorA: public BehaviorBase
{
   void DoSomethingOn(Object* obj)
   {
    printf("Behavior A\n");
   }
};

class BehaviorB: public BehaviorBase
{
   string other_data;
   void DoSomethingOn(Object* obj)
   {
    printf("Behavior B\n");
   }
};

void Object::DoSomething()
{
    behavior->DoSomethingOn(this);
}

Object::~Object()
{
    delete behavior;
}

void Object::ChangeBehavior(int param)
{
    delete behavior;
    switch(param)
    {
        case 1: behavior = new BehaviorA; break;
        case 2: behavior = new BehaviorB; break;
    }
}    

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int param=1;
    Object *obj;
    obj= new Object;

    obj->ChangeBehavior(param);
    obj->DoSomething();     
    delete obj;
    return(0);
}
share|improve this answer

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