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Disclaimer

Yes, I am fully aware that what I am asking about is totally stupid and that anyone who would wish to try such a thing in production code should be fired and/or shot. I'm mainly looking to see if can be done.

Now that that's out of the way, is there any way to access private class members in C++ from outside the class? For example, is there any way to do this with pointer offsets?

(Naive and otherwise non-production-ready techniques welcome)

Update

As noted in the comments, I asked this question because I wanted to write a blog post on over-encapsulation (and how it affects TDD). I wanted to see if there was a way to say "using private variables isn't a 100% reliable way to enforce encapsulation, even in C++." At the end, I decided to focus more on how to solve the problem rather than why it's a problem, so I didn't feature some of the stuff brought up here as prominently as I had planned, but I still left a link.

At any rate, if anyone's interested in how it came out, here it is: Enemies of Test Driven Development part I: encapsulation (I suggest reading it before you decide that I'm crazy).

share|improve this question
    
Out of interest, why ask the question. The only use I can think for this is to hack into someone elses API to wreak havoc. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 8 '09 at 14:48
    
I'm writing a blog post on over-encapsulation. I was just looking to see if it was possible to say "protection by private methods isn't perfect, even in C++!" I'll post the link once I've gotten it written. –  Jason Baker Jan 8 '09 at 15:34
    
Sounds fun, I look forward to it. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 8 '09 at 16:07
    
Look ad 'dalle' Below for the template back door. –  Loki Astari Jan 8 '09 at 19:26

20 Answers 20

up vote 37 down vote accepted

If the class contains any template member functions you can specialize that member function to suit your needs. Even if the original developer didn't think of it.

safe.h

class safe
{
    int money;

public:
    safe()
     : money(1000000)
    {
    }

    template <typename T>
    void backdoor()
    {
        // Do some stuff.
    }
};

main.cpp:

#include <safe.h>
#include <iostream>

class key;

template <>
void safe::backdoor<key>()
{
    // My specialization.
    money -= 100000;
    std::cout << money << "\n";
}

int main()
{
    safe s;
    s.backdoor<key>();
    s.backdoor<key>();
}

Output:

900000
800000
share|improve this answer
7  
There is a potential that key will clash. Put it in an anonymous namespace. –  Loki Astari Jan 12 '09 at 17:08

Hmmm, don't know if this would work, but might be worth a try. Create another class with the same layout as the object with private members but with private changed to public. Create a variable of pointer to this class. Use a simple cast to point this to your object with private members and try calling a private function.

Expect sparks and maybe a crash ;)

share|improve this answer
    
i like it, in theory should work. –  Evan Teran Jan 8 '09 at 13:07
    
"with the same layout". This is the hard part. The compiler has a good bit of freedom on how it lays out members in a non-POD. In practice though, it will probably work. –  Richard Corden Jan 8 '09 at 13:35
    
@Richard Corden - That would be my feeling as well. Illustrating once againa that 'Would probably work' and 'should be done in a piece of release' are worlds apart. –  Shane MacLaughlin Jan 8 '09 at 14:41
    
+1 to Richard Corden –  Marcin Jan 8 '09 at 15:38
    
Thats an interesting one..I expected most to give the answer involving pointer offsets. I want to try out this one. –  Naveen Jan 8 '09 at 16:03

The following is sneaky, illegal, compiler-dependent, and may not work depending on various implementation details.

#define private public
#define class struct

But it is an answer to your OP, in which you explicitly invite a technique which, and I quote, is "totally stupid and that anyone who would wish to try such a thing in production code should be fired and/or shot".


Anothr technique is to access private member data, by contructing pointers using hard-coded/hand-coded offsets from the begining of the object.

share|improve this answer
2  
You also need #define class struct, otherwise the private-by-default may thwart you. –  Tom Jan 8 '09 at 13:36
    
Preprocessor hacks are no more access to private members than pointer dereferencing is. –  cletus Jan 8 '09 at 13:42
    
rq is wrong on the mechanism (relaxing access checks never invalidate a valid program, due to the moment when they happen). The hack violates the ODR and might break the program due to name mangling. –  MSalters Jan 8 '09 at 16:21
1  
Sorry does not work on all compilers. –  Loki Astari Jan 8 '09 at 19:25
    
Edited the post, to reference the "disclaimer" in the OP. –  ChrisW Jan 8 '09 at 19:57

I've just added an entry to my blog that shows how it can be done. Here is an example on how you use it for the following class

struct A {
private:
  int member;
};

Just declare a tag name and instantiate a robber like the following example shows (my post shows the implementation of the robber). You can then access that member using a member pointer

struct Amem { typedef int type; };
template class rob<Amem, &A::member>;

int main() {
  A a;
  a.*result<Amem>::ptr = 42; // Doh!
}

But actually, this doesn't show that c++'s access rules aren't reliable. The language rules are designed to protect against accidental mistakes - if you try to rob data of an object, the language by-design does not take long ways to prevent you.

share|improve this answer
    
shouldn't it be "the language rules are NOT.."? –  user195488 Feb 26 '13 at 22:32
    
This does not seem to work. It works with the private function example on your blog, but with int I get: error: non-type template argument of type 'int A::*' must have an integral or enumeration type (for template class rob<Amem, &A::member>;) –  chris Jun 30 at 8:36
    
@chris i recommend making a question on SO about this. i can't help with comments –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 9 at 17:34
    
I just found myself having to resort to this to make my program work. How embarassing. –  Puppy Aug 11 at 22:14
class A 
{ 
   int a; 
}
class B
{
   public: 
   int b;
}

union 
{ 
    A a; 
    B b; 
};

That should do it.

ETA: It will work for this sort of trivial class, but as a general thing it won't. TC++PL Section C.8.3 says "A class with a constructor, destructor, or copy operation cannot be the type of a union member ... because the compiler would not know which member to destroy."

So we're left with the best bet being to declare class B to match A's layout, then using B * b = reinterpret_cast<B*>(&a); as the "best" "peeping tom" hack to look at a class's privates.

share|improve this answer
1  
sounds like a good idea .. –  hasenj Jan 9 '09 at 12:30
2  
No, no, no, not at all a good idea. Just because you can do it, doesn't mean you should. –  Rob K Jan 9 '09 at 17:41

If you can get a pointer to a member of a class you can use the pointer no matter what the access specifiers are (even methods).

class X;
typedef void (X::*METHOD)(int);

class X
{
    private:
       void test(int) {}
    public:
       METHOD getMethod() { return &X::test;}
};

int main()
{
     X      x;
     METHOD m = x.getMethod();

     X     y;
     (y.*m)(5);
}

Of course my favorite little hack is the friend template back door.

class Z
{
    public:
        template<typename X>
        void backDoor(X const& p);
    private:
        int x;
        int y;
};

Assuming the creator of the above has defined backDoor for his normal uses. But you want to access the object and look at the private member variables. Even if the above class has been compiled into a static library you can add your own template specialization for backDoor and thus access the members.

namespace
{
    // Make this inside an anonymous namespace so
    // that it does not clash with any real types.
    class Y{};
}
// Now do a template specialization for the method.
template<>
void Z::backDoor<Y>(Y const& p)
{
     // I now have access to the private members of Z
}

int main()
{
    Z  z;   // Your object Z

    // Use the Y object to carry the payload into the method.
    z.backDoor(Y());
}
share|improve this answer

It's definately possible to access private members with a pointer offset in C++. Lets assume i had the following type definition that I wanted access to.

class Bar {
  SomeOtherType _m1;
  int _m2;
};

Assuming there are no virtual methods in Bar, The easy case is _m1. Members in C++ are stored as offsets of the memory location of the object. The first object is at offset 0, the second object at offset of sizeof(first member), etc ...

So here is a way to access _m1.

SomeOtherType& GetM1(Bar* pBar) {
  return*(reinterpret_cast<SomeOtherType*>(pBar)); 
}

Now _m2 is a bit more difficult. We need to move the original pointer sizeof(SomeOtherType) bytes from the original. The cast to char is to ensure that I am incrementing in a byte offset

int& GetM2(Bar* pBar) {
  char* p = reinterpret_cast<char*>(pBar);
  p += sizeof(SomeOtherType);
  return *(reinterpret_cast<int*>(p));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Watch out for memory padding and alignment issues. But +1 certainly doable! –  Mr.Ree Jan 8 '09 at 20:06

If you know how your C++ compiler mangles names, yes.

Unless, I suppose, it's a virtual function. But then, if you know how your C++ compiler builds the VTABLE ...

Edit: looking at the other responses, I realize that I misread the question and thought it was about member functions, not member data. However, the point still stands: if you know how your compiler lays out data, then you can access that data.

share|improve this answer
1  
I find this answer interesting because the biggest argument against using Python's private members is that it's really just name mangling (albeit a more standardized name mangling). It's interesting to know that things are about the same in C++. –  Jason Baker Jan 8 '09 at 16:39
2  
Jason - the difference is, in Python, you may get your wrist slapped for accessing privates. In C++, your fellow developers will shoot you for going to these lengths to subvert encapsulation. –  Tom Jan 9 '09 at 5:47

cool question btw... here's my piece:

using namespace std;

class Test
{

private:

  int accessInt;
  string accessString;

public:

  Test(int accessInt,string accessString)
  {
    Test::accessInt=accessInt;
    Test::accessString=accessString;
  }
};

int main(int argnum,char **args)
{
  int x;
  string xyz;
  Test obj(1,"Shit... This works!");

  x=((int *)(&obj))[0];
  xyz=((string *)(&obj))[1];

  cout<<x<<endl<<xyz<<endl;
  return 0;
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

"using private variables isn't a 100% reliable way to enforce encapsulation, even in C++." Really? You can disassemble the library you need, find all the offsets needed and use them. That will give you an ability to change any private member you like... BUT! You can't access private members without some dirty hacking. Let us say that writing const won't make your constant be really constant, 'cause you can cast const away or just use it's address to invalidate it. If you're using MSVC++ and you specified "-merge:.rdata=.data" to a linker, the trick will work without any memory access faults. We can even say that writing apps in C++ is not reliable way to write programs, 'cause resulting low level code may be patched from somewhere outside when your app is running. Then what is reliable documented way to enforce encapsulation? Can we hide the data somewhere in RAM and prevent anything from accessing them except our code? The only idea I have is to encrypt private members and backup them, 'cause something may corrupt those members. Sorry if my answer is too rude, I didn't mean to offend anybody, but I really don't think that statement is wise.

share|improve this answer

As an alternative to template backdoor method you can use template backdoor class. The difference is that you don't need to put this backdoor class into public area of the class your are going to test. I use the fact that many compilers allow nested classes to access private area of enclosing class (which is not exactly 1998 standard but considered to be "right" behaviour). And of course in C++11 this became legal behaviour.

See this example:

#include <vector>
#include <cassert>
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;


///////// SystemUnderTest.hpp
class SystemUnderTest
{
   //...put this 'Tested' declaration into private area of a class that you are going to test
   template<typename T> class Tested;
public:
   SystemUnderTest(int a): a_(a) {}
private:
   friend std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const SystemUnderTest& sut)
   {
      return os << sut.a_;
   }
   int a_;
};

/////////TestFramework.hpp
class BaseTest
{
public:
   virtual void run() = 0;
   const char* name() const { return name_; }
protected:
   BaseTest(const char* name): name_(name) {}
   virtual ~BaseTest() {}
private:
   BaseTest(const BaseTest&);
   BaseTest& operator=(const BaseTest&);
   const char* name_;
};

class TestSuite
{
   typedef std::vector<BaseTest*> Tests;
   typedef Tests::iterator TIter;
public:
   static TestSuite& instance()
   {
      static TestSuite TestSuite;
      return TestSuite;
   }
   void run()
   {
      for(TIter iter = tests_.begin(); tests_.end() != iter; ++iter)
      {
         BaseTest* test = *iter;
         cout << "Run test: " << test->name() << endl;
         test->run();
      }
   }
   void addTest(BaseTest* test)
   {
      assert(test);
      cout << "Add test: " << test->name() << endl;
      tests_.push_back(test);
   }
private:
   std::vector<BaseTest*> tests_;
};

#define TEST_CASE(SYSTEM_UNDER_TEST, TEST_NAME) \
class TEST_NAME {}; \
template<> \
class SYSTEM_UNDER_TEST::Tested<TEST_NAME>: public BaseTest \
{ \
   Tested(): BaseTest(#SYSTEM_UNDER_TEST "::" #TEST_NAME) \
   { \
      TestSuite::instance().addTest(this); \
   } \
   void run(); \
   static Tested instance_; \
}; \
SYSTEM_UNDER_TEST::Tested<TEST_NAME> SYSTEM_UNDER_TEST::Tested<TEST_NAME>::instance_; \
void SYSTEM_UNDER_TEST::Tested<TEST_NAME>::run()


//...TestSuiteForSystemUnderTest.hpp
TEST_CASE(SystemUnderTest, AccessPrivateValueTest)
{
   SystemUnderTest sut(23);
   cout << "Changed private data member from " << sut << " to ";
   sut.a_ = 12;
   cout << sut << endl;
}

//...TestRunner.cpp
int main()
{
   TestSuite::instance().run();
}
share|improve this answer

The following code accesses and modifies a private member of the class using a pointer to that class.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
class A
{
    int private_var;
    public:
    A(){private_var = 0;}//initialized to zero.
    void print(){cout<<private_var<<endl;}
};

int main()
{
    A ob;
    int *ptr = (int*)&ob; // the pointer to the class is typecast to a integer pointer.  
    (*ptr)++; //private variable now changed to 1.
    ob.print();
    return 0;
}
/*prints 1. subsequent members can also be accessed by incrementing the pointer (and
  type casting if necessary).*/
share|improve this answer
    
This is "ideal" situation where you do know the class instance variables layout. However, it's incorrect in case where class has ancestors with ivars or has virtual members. Nevertheless you solution based on knowledge of particular implementation. So, basically, you don't answer the original question "Can I access private members from outside the class without using friends?", you show how to access memory of class private members in particular implementation. –  Petro Korienev Aug 10 at 13:07

Beside #define private public you can also #define private protected and then define some foo class as descendant of wanted class to have access to it's (now protected) methods via type casting.

share|improve this answer

just create your own access member function to extend the class.

share|improve this answer

To all the people suggesting "#define private public":

This kind of thing is illegal. The standard forbids defining/undef-ing macros that are lexically equivalent to reserved language keywords. While your compiler probably won't complain (I've yet to see a compiler that does), it isn't something that's a "Good Thing" to do.

share|improve this answer
    
But you'll note that the question doesn't require that this be a "good thing" to do. In fact, a good way to do this may not exist. –  Jason Baker Jan 8 '09 at 16:27
    
Well, the question does require that the method work, right? Since the standard forbids this sort of thing the method outlined by other is simply broken by definition. It works because most compilers don't enforce this rule. –  Tritium Jan 8 '09 at 16:35
    
Jason, the question requires that this can be done. at least when you include a standard header, then you run into undefined behavior, and that can't be an answer to this question. turning stuff into undefined behavior allows the compiler to do just about anything it wants. (formatting your HD) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 8 '09 at 19:23
    
(and including forbidding you to access the privates - which ironically is just what the questioner does not want). It's as far as i know allowed to #define keywords when there is no standard header included into the same translation unit though. but as i said, that can't be the solution! –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jan 8 '09 at 19:28
    
litb, your logic isn't quite right. It's is explicitly FORBIDDEN to define a macro name that is lexically identical to ANY reserved keyword, regardless of what you include in a translation unit. It's as simple as: "don't do it, it's illegal". –  Tritium Jan 8 '09 at 20:26

It's actually quite easy:

class jail {
    int inmate;
public:
    int& escape() { return inmate; }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
I assume that the OP wants access without modifying the class definition itself. –  j_random_hacker Jan 9 '09 at 9:51
    
For Test-Driven Development, such backdoors could make sense. They're easy to remove with a #define. #define's that mess with public/private can affect program semantics, e.g. POD-ness. –  MSalters Jan 9 '09 at 12:56

since you have an object of required class I am guessing that you have declaration of class. Now what you can do is declare another class with same members but keep all of there access specifiers as public.

For example previous class is:

class Iamcompprivate
{
private:
    Type1 privateelement1;
    Typ2 privateelement2;
    ...

public:
    somefunctions
}

you can declare a class as

class NowIampublic
{
**public:**
    Type1 privateelement1;
    Type2 privateelement2;
    ...

    somefunctions
};

Now all you need to do is cast pointer of class Iamcompprivate into an pointer of class NowIampublic and use them as U wish.

Example:

NowIampublic * changetopublic(Iamcompprivate *A)
{
    NowIampublic * B = (NowIampublic *)A;
    return B;
}
share|improve this answer

By referencing to *this you enable a backdoor to all private data within an object.

class DumbClass
{
private:
    int my_private_int;
public:
    DumbClass& backdoor()
    {
        return *this;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Quite often a class provides mutator methods to private data (getters and setters).

If a class does provide a getter that returns a const reference (but no setter), then you can just const_cast the return value of the getter, and use that as an l-value:

class A {
  private:
    double _money;
  public:
    A(money) :
      _money(money)
    {}

    const double &getMoney() const
    {
      return _money;
    }
};

A a(1000.0);
const_cast<double &>(a.getMoney()) = 2000.0;
share|improve this answer

I've used another useful approach (and solution) to access a c++ private/protected member.
The only condition is that you are able to inherit from the class you want to access.
Then all credit goes to reinterpret_cast<>().

A possible problem is that it won't work if you insert a virtual function, which will modify virtual table, and so, object size/alignment.

class QObject
{
    Q_OBJECT
    Q_DECLARE_PRIVATE(QObject)
    void dumpObjectInfo();
    void dumpObjectTree();
...
protected:
    QScopedPointer<QObjectData> d_ptr;
...
}

class QObjectWrapper : public QObject
{
public:
    void dumpObjectInfo2();
    void dumpObjectTree2();
};

Then you just need to use the class as follows:

QObject* origin;
QObjectWrapper * testAccesor = reinterpret_cast<QObjectWrapper *>(origin);
testAccesor->dumpObjectInfo2();
testAccesor->dumpObjectTree2();

My original problem was as follows: I needed a solution that won't imply recompiling QT libraries.
There are 2 methods in QObject, dumpObjectInfo() and dumpObjectTree(), that just work if QT libs are compiled in debug mode, and they of course need access to d_ptr proteted member (among other internal structures).
What I did was to use the proposed solution to reimplement (with copy and paste) those methods in dumpObjectInfo2() and dumpObjectTree2() in my own class (QObjectWrapper) removing those debug preprocesor guards.

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