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i need a bit of help with some maths.

I have a range 0 - 127 and i want to convert it into percentage.

So 0% = 0 and 100% = 127 and every number inbetween.

How would i do this?

Edit:

Thanks to what jon posted, i came up with:

$percent * 127 / 100

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want to go from a value to a percentage, eg from 63.5 to 50%, divide your value by 127 & multiply by 100.

If you want to go the other way, eg from 50% to 63.5, it's the reverse: divide your percentage by 100 & multiply by 127.

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Also if you're using this in a programming language that you might need to convert to a float or the value will get truncated. –  robbrit Nov 22 '10 at 1:27
    
How would i do that, the other way round? –  Ozzy Nov 22 '10 at 1:28
    
i will accept when i can –  Ozzy Nov 22 '10 at 1:32
    
@Ozzy: updated... –  Jon Nov 22 '10 at 1:36

Generally, if you have numbers in the interval [a,b], to get the percentage inside your interval, the formula is:

percentage = 100 * (x-a) / (b-a)  

Where x is your value

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While Jon's answer was not incorrect, the answer given by belisarius was more complete, in that it allowed for a range of numbers beginning and ending with any number, and not necessarily starting with 0.

Here's a little better way to represent the formula:

percentage = (value - min) / (max - min)

If you want to represent the percentage as a whole number instead of a decimal, simply multiply the result by 100.

And here's the reverse (going from a percentage to a value):

value = ((max - min) * percentage) + min

The percentage here is a decimal. If your percentage is a whole number, simply divide it by 100 before inserting in this formula.

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