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I am using pypy to translate some python script to C language. Say that I have a python class like this:

class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 0
    def func(self): 
        pass

I notice that A.func is a unbound method rather than a function so that it cannot be translated by pypy. So I change the code slightly:

def func(self): 
    pass
class A:
    def __init__(self):
        self.a = 0
A.func = func
def target(*args):
    return func, None

Now func seems to be able to be translated by pypy. However when I try translate.py --source test.py, an exception [translation:ERROR] TypeError: signature mismatch: func() takes exactly 2 arguments (1 given) is raised. I notice that it might because I haven't annotate self argument yet. However this self have type A, so how can I annotate a class?

Thank you for your reading and answer.

share|improve this question
    
Decorator syntax. –  Rafe Kettler Nov 22 '10 at 2:24
    
What's the target() function for? –  martineau Nov 22 '10 at 6:51
    
What line does the translation:ERROR apply to? I don't see any calls to func() in the code. What does the error have to do with "annotating" a class? –  martineau Nov 22 '10 at 6:54
    
Somehow I'm not surprised that you're have difficulty translating object-oriented code with classes into C which is a procedural language without a class type. –  martineau Nov 22 '10 at 6:56
    
FYI everybody: From <codespeak.net/pypy/dist/pypy/doc/translation.html#annotator>; "The major goal of the annotator is to "annotate" each variable that appears in a flow graph. An "annotation" describes all the possible Python objects that this variable could contain at run-time, based on a whole-program analysis of all the flow graphs -- one per function." –  martineau Nov 22 '10 at 7:06

2 Answers 2

Essentially PyPy's entry point is a function (accepting sys.argv usually as an argument). Whatever this function calls (create objects, call methods) will get annotated. There is no way to annotate a class, since PyPy's compiled code does not export this as API, but rather as a standalone program.

You might want to for example:

def f():
    a = A()
    a.func()

or even:

a = A()
def f():
   a.func()

in which case a is a prebuilt constant.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, fijal. I do know that when I call a function from the entry point that function will get annotated. However when I call that function only once, arguments will became constants in the generate code. Say a function def f(a): return a + 1. If I call it in the entry point like f(1), it will generate a 2 instead of a function long pypy_g_f(long a){return a + 1}, So I have to call it twice or more to make things right. It's kind of complicated. So I was trying to generate function directly using translateshell.py and that comes my question –  huangcd Nov 23 '10 at 1:06
    
translatorshell is deprecated anyway. If you want to export some interface there is translator/goal/sharedpypy.py and translator/c/dlltool.py which are a start of what you want if you want to embed an RPython program. They'll give a sane names for functions for example. I've used this to embed pypy in webkit. –  fijal Nov 23 '10 at 13:51

Are you wanting a staticmethod or a classmethod?

share|improve this answer
    
Both staticmethod and classmethod are OK for me, and classmethod might be better –  huangcd Nov 22 '10 at 2:27
    
If you're just not caring about self and don't need to do anything with the class, use staticmethod. –  Chris Morgan Nov 22 '10 at 2:41
    
Sorry may be I didn't make myself clear. I did care about self. it has to be a specific class. I need to interact with the member of the class –  huangcd Nov 22 '10 at 2:49
    
If you're caring about self in the method then you can't do A.func() - you'd need to give it an A instance as that first parameter, e.g. A.func(A()). Do you understand the basic Python way of doing these things? Is your code working in CPython? –  Chris Morgan Nov 22 '10 at 3:06
    
Yes, I understand that. I just want to check the correctness of function func. Since there are lack of tools for python, I want to translate my function to C firstly and then check the C code. So it's kind of that I don't care about whether func is a bound method of class A or just a function. –  huangcd Nov 22 '10 at 3:19

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