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Hi I have written this code with the stackoverflow help :) but my "getX" field is double .how can I solve this problem? thanks

code:

public class NewClass2 implements Comparator<Point>
{
public int compare(Point p1, Point p2)
{
    return (int)(p1.getY() - p2.getY());
}


}

I need compare() return double not int. i.e., two double number "3.1" and "3.2" when 3.2 - 3.1 = 0.1 which will be cast to int and the difference will be 0!!!!

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Why do you need compare to return double? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Nov 22 '10 at 3:41
    
two double number which are x part of a point's dimension . –  user472221 Nov 22 '10 at 3:46
    
You wrote the code with the help of your previous questions so why haven't you accepted any previous answers????? –  camickr Nov 22 '10 at 5:14
3  
You are asking far too many questions on simple problems. I think you need to learn to solve some of these problems yourself. You know, like read some books, learn to use a debugger, do the "hard yards". Asking other people to solve your problems won't help you learn. –  Stephen C Nov 22 '10 at 5:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 27 down vote accepted

You don't need to return double.

The Comparator interface is used to establish an ordering for the elements being compared. Having fields that use double is irrelevant to this ordering.

Your code is fine.

Sorry, I was wrong, reading the question again, this is what you need:

public class NewClass2 implements Comparator<Point> {
    public int compare(Point p1, Point p2) {
        if (p1.getY() < p2.getY()) return -1;
        if (p1.getY() > p2.getY()) return 1;
        return 0;
    }    
}
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you mean what should I do for double ? –  user472221 Nov 22 '10 at 3:49
    
Check my updated answer for what you should do. –  dteoh Nov 22 '10 at 3:58
    
thanks a lot ! : ) –  user472221 Nov 22 '10 at 4:15
2  
I think this will fail with NaN and *_INFINITY –  Jerome Nov 28 '12 at 9:46

I suggest you use the builtin method Double.compare(). If you need a range for double values to be equal you can use chcek for that first.

return Double.compare(p1.getY(), p2.gety());

or

if(Math.abs(p1.getY()-p2.getY()) < ERR) return 0;    
return Double.compare(p1.getY(), p2.gety());

The problem with using < and > is that NaN will return false in both cases resulting in a possibly inconsistent handling. e.g. NaN is defined as not being equal to anything, even itself however in @suihock's and @Martinho's solutions, if either value is NaN the method will return 0 everytime, implying that NaN is equal to everything.

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1  
+1 for delegating the comparison to Double.compareTo and pointing out the erroneous behavior when comparing NaN (and, in addition, comparing 0.0d to -0.0d) –  Martijn Nov 28 '12 at 9:37
1  
Java 7 added compare() for Long and Integer consistency. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 28 '12 at 9:42

The method compare should return an int. It is a number that is either:

  • Less than zero, if the first value is less than the second;
  • Equal to zero, if the two values are equal;
  • Greater than zero, if the first value is greater than the second;

You don't need to return a double. You must return an int to implement the Comparator interface. You just have to return the correct int, according to the rules I outlined above.

You can't simply cast from int, as, like you said, a difference of 0.1 will result in 0. You can simply do this:

public int compare(Point p1, Point p2)
{
    double delta= p1.getY() - p2.getY();
    if(delta > 0) return 1;
    if(delta < 0) return -1;
    return 0;
}

But since comparison of floating-point values is always troublesome, you should compare within a certain range (see this question), something like this:

public int compare(Point p1, Point p2)
{
    double delta = p1.getY() - p2.getY();
    if(delta > 0.00001) return 1;
    if(delta < -0.00001) return -1;
    return 0;
}
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thanks for complete answer ! I get the whole ! I never forget such a this way –  user472221 Nov 22 '10 at 4:14

Well, you could multiply those double values by an appropriate factor before converting into integer, for eg. in your case since its only one decimal place so 10 would be a good factor;

return (int)(p1.getY()*10 - p2.getY()*10);
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