Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I am dynamically generating a query like below that creates different combinations of rules by left joining (any number of times) on itself and avoiding rules with some of the same attributes as part of the joins conditions e.g.

SELECT count(*) 
FROM rules AS t1 
LEFT JOIN rules AS t2
 ON t1.id != t2.id
 AND ...
LEFT JOIN rules AS t3
 ON t1.id != t2.id AND t1.id != t3.id AND t2.id != t3.id
 AND ...

I am currently removing duplicates by creating an array of ids from the joined rows then sorting and grouping by them:

SELECT sort(array[t1.id, t2.id, t3.id]) AS ids
...
GROUP BY ids

I would like to know if there is a better way of removing duplicate rows e.g.

t1.ID | t2.ID | t3.ID
---------------------
  A   |   B   |   C
  C   |   B   |   A

Should be

t1.ID | t2.ID | t3.ID
---------------------
  A   |   B   |   C

Or

t1.ID | t2.ID | t3.ID
---------------------
  C   |   B   |   A

But not both.

EDIT: I would like to go from a permutation of rows to a combination rows.

share|improve this question
    
use DISTINCT with GROUP BY –  Mohamed Saligh Nov 22 '10 at 6:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I'd suggest rather than joining on !=, try joining on <=.

You will then have all combinations with t1.id > t2.id, t2.id > t3.id, and so on.

Rows will not be 'duplicates' because they are ordered sets, and any set containing equivalent members would necessarily result in the identical ordered set.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I'm still trying to get my head around the problem and your answer is something that I have experimented with. Unfortunately it seems to remove some valid combinations which I'm at a loss to explain at the moment. Possibly a result of a joins condition that I haven't listed above. Will continue to experiment. –  Moriarty Nov 22 '10 at 7:07
    
I'll give the answer to you because you were the first to suggest ordered sets. Cheers. –  Moriarty Nov 23 '10 at 3:31

I think you mean you want to go from a permutation of rows to a combination rows?

If so, the select distinct answers are wrong. Select distinct will select distinct permutations. I think you have a pretty good way of doing it. The only thing I can think of, would be to concatenate the rules into a string and the sort it in place. It looks like you are using Postgresql and there is no function that does it in the built-in string functions.

If the amount of symbols were small you might be able to insert them into the array pre-sorted by inserting 'A' in index 1, 'B' into index 2, etc. Which might might the sort quicker ...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. Unfortunately the number of symbols are not small and I have a need for speed! –  Moriarty Nov 22 '10 at 6:40
    
If you have a requirement for speed, then you should think about denormalizing your data here. That will allow you to fetch the data much quicker, but you would have to pay for it with some design overhead. Breaking normalization in order to achieve speed can be a valid choice. Also you might consider adding a "Rule_ID", so all rules will be mapped to a single rule set. –  Heiko Hatzfeld Nov 22 '10 at 18:03

You need to get an order into your results in order to filter all duplicates out. This can be achieved by making sure that a<b<c. And once you have an order in your results, you can apply a distinct to the resultset.

` SELECT count(*) FROM rules AS t1

LEFT JOIN rules AS t2 ON t1.id != t2.id AND

LEFT JOIN rules AS t3 ON t1.id != t2.id AND t1.id != t3.id AND t2.id != t3.id ...

t1.id < t2.id and t2.id < t3.id ...

AND ...`

share|improve this answer

Difficult to understand exactly what you're trying to achieve, but to avoid the A-B-C C-B-A duplication, try this:

SELECT count(*) 
FROM rules AS t1 
LEFT JOIN rules AS t2
 ON t1.id **<** t2.id
 AND ...
LEFT JOIN rules AS t3
 ON t1.id **<** t2.id AND t1.id **<** t3.id AND t2.id **<** t3.id
 AND ...

That way, the answers are always ordered

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. The important thing is the data (combination) in each row is different not the order. –  Moriarty Nov 22 '10 at 8:44
    
If A-B-C is the same as C-B-A, the only way to compare them is to express them both as A-B-C (or maybe there's still something I'm missing). Could you give a concrete example of what you're trying to achieve (with some realistic data)? –  smirkingman Nov 22 '10 at 11:43
    
Is this the same as my answer? –  Kirk Broadhurst Nov 23 '10 at 3:27
    
@kirk boradhurst yes, pretty well, but your answer wasn't there when I started typing mine. Great minds think alike. –  smirkingman Nov 23 '10 at 7:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.