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I'm trying to determine if a point is inside a polygon. the Polygon is defined by an array of Point objects. I can easily figure out if the point is inside the bounded box of the polygon, but I'm not sure how to tell if it's inside the actual polygon or not. If possible, I'd like to only use C# and WinForms. I'd rather not call on OpenGL or something to do this simple task.

Here's the code I have so far:

private void CalculateOuterBounds()
{
    //m_aptVertices is a Point[] which holds the vertices of the polygon.
    // and X/Y min/max are just ints
    Xmin = Xmax = m_aptVertices[0].X;
    Ymin = Ymax = m_aptVertices[0].Y;

    foreach(Point pt in m_aptVertices)
    {
        if(Xmin > pt.X)
            Xmin = pt.X;

        if(Xmax < pt.X)
            Xmax = pt.X;

        if(Ymin > pt.Y)
            Ymin = pt.Y;

        if(Ymax < pt.Y)
            Ymax = pt.Y;
    }
}

public bool Contains(Point pt)
{
    bool bContains = true; //obviously wrong at the moment :)

    if(pt.X < Xmin || pt.X > Xmax || pt.Y < Ymin || pt.Y > Ymax)
        bContains = false;
    else
    {
        //figure out if the point is in the polygon
    }

    return bContains;
}
share|improve this question
    
polygon is convex? –  Saeed Amiri Nov 22 '10 at 7:04
    
You could always just use the Region class. –  leppie Nov 22 '10 at 7:06
    
@Saeed I believe all of them are convex. @leppie, I'm unfamiliar with the Region class. want to write some code up for me? –  jb. Nov 22 '10 at 7:08
2  
@jb: No, it is simple enough to learn. –  leppie Nov 22 '10 at 7:36

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

See this it's in c++ and can be done in c# in a same way.

for convex polygon is too easy:

If the polygon is convex then one can consider the polygon as a "path" from the first vertex. A point is on the interior of this polygons if it is always on the same side of all the line segments making up the path.

Given a line segment between P0 (x0,y0) and P1 (x1,y1), another point P (x,y) has the following relationship to the line segment. Compute (y - y0) (x1 - x0) - (x - x0) (y1 - y0)

if it is less than 0 then P is to the right of the line segment, if greater than 0 it is to the left, if equal to 0 then it lies on the line segment.

And this is a code for it in c#, may be is buggy:

        public static bool IsInPolygon(Point[] poly, Point point)
        {
           var coef = poly.Skip(1).Select((p, i) => 
                                           (point.Y - poly[i].Y)*(p.X - poly[i].X) 
                                         - (point.X - poly[i].X) * (p.Y - poly[i].Y))
                                   .ToList();

            if (coef.Any(p => p == 0))
                return true;

            for (int i = 1; i < coef.Count(); i++)
            {
                if (coef[i] * coef[i - 1] < 0)
                    return false;
            }
            return true;
        }

I test it with simple rectangle works fine:

            Point[] pts = new Point[] { new Point { X = 1, Y = 1 }, 
                                        new Point { X = 1, Y = 3 }, 
                                        new Point { X = 3, Y = 3 }, 
                                        new Point { X = 3, Y = 1 } };
            IsInPolygon(pts, new Point { X = 2, Y = 2 }); ==> true
            IsInPolygon(pts, new Point { X = 1, Y = 2 }); ==> true
            IsInPolygon(pts, new Point { X = 0, Y = 2 }); ==> false

Explanation on the linq query:

poly.Skip(1) ==> creates a new list started from position 1 of the poly list and then by (point.Y - poly[i].Y)*(p.X - poly[i].X) - (point.X - poly[i].X) * (p.Y - poly[i].Y) we'll going to calculate the direction (which mentioned in referenced paragraph). similar example (with another operation):

lst = 2,4,8,12,7,19
lst.Skip(1) ==> 4,8,12,7,19
lst.Skip(1).Select((p,i)=>p-lst[i]) ==> 2,4,4,-5,12
share|improve this answer
    
well, it works, though i'm not entirely sure how. mind explaining it a bit? mostly the coef linq statement part. –  jb. Nov 25 '10 at 4:54
    
@Anthony, I didn't say that the code is correct, I wrote it in few minutes, also I'm not going to fix it, because I said the algorithm, and algorithm is important here, no one is going to do others project. And your task is not my business even we know that with a simple modification this works well. –  Saeed Amiri May 15 '13 at 11:40
    
Why the downvotes? Is clear that I have no claim about the code, and explicitly I mentioned this. I just described the algorithm and wrote the sample code with just one test for illustration, I never said code is correct, sure I'm not going to answer "Do you haz teh codez" type questions with algorithm tag. –  Saeed Amiri Jun 11 '13 at 21:46
    
@Anthony, I already clearly said this in my answer, I think your assertion is not necessary at all (like your possible downvote). –  Saeed Amiri Jun 11 '13 at 22:56

The accepted answer did not work for me in my project. I ended up using the code found here http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winforms/thread/95055cdc-60f8-4c22-8270-ab5f9870270a/.

    public static bool IsInPolygon(Point[] poly, Point p)
    {
        Point p1, p2;


        bool inside = false;


        if (poly.Length < 3)
        {
            return inside;
        }


        var oldPoint = new Point(
            poly[poly.Length - 1].X, poly[poly.Length - 1].Y);


        for (int i = 0; i < poly.Length; i++)
        {
            var newPoint = new Point(poly[i].X, poly[i].Y);


            if (newPoint.X > oldPoint.X)
            {
                p1 = oldPoint;

                p2 = newPoint;
            }

            else
            {
                p1 = newPoint;

                p2 = oldPoint;
            }


            if ((newPoint.X < p.X) == (p.X <= oldPoint.X)
                && (p.Y - (long) p1.Y)*(p2.X - p1.X)
                < (p2.Y - (long) p1.Y)*(p.X - p1.X))
            {
                inside = !inside;
            }


            oldPoint = newPoint;
        }


        return inside;
    }
share|improve this answer

I've checked codes here and all have problems.

The best method is:

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines if the given point is inside the polygon
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="polygon">the vertices of polygon</param>
    /// <param name="testPoint">the given point</param>
    /// <returns>true if the point is inside the polygon; otherwise, false</returns>
    public static bool IsPointInPolygon4(PointF[] polygon, PointF testPoint)
    {
        bool result = false;
        int j = polygon.Count() - 1;
        for (int i = 0; i < polygon.Count(); i++)
        {
            if (polygon[i].Y < testPoint.Y && polygon[j].Y >= testPoint.Y || polygon[j].Y < testPoint.Y && polygon[i].Y >= testPoint.Y)
            {
                if (polygon[i].X + (testPoint.Y - polygon[i].Y) / (polygon[j].Y - polygon[i].Y) * (polygon[j].X - polygon[i].X) < testPoint.X)
                {
                    result = !result;
                }
            }
            j = i;
        }
        return result;
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
how about some words to explain the codes –  jb. Feb 21 '13 at 15:57
    
This works well, back make sure you don't unthinkingly implement this with Ints like I did! Be sure to use floats. The rounding errors caused the division make the method fail a tiny proportion of the time... very annoying! –  Jason Crease Apr 27 '13 at 14:34
    
Works like a charm. I'm using this to determine if the given location lies inside a closed polygon (mapping solution). And now, the hard part. To understand the code :P –  fa wildchild Jan 26 at 11:01
    
This is by far the best solution, IMHO. –  natephette Feb 6 at 21:16

You can use the ray casting algorithm. It is well-described in the wikipedia page for the Point in polygon problem.

It's as simple as counting the number of times a ray from outside to that point touches the polygon boundaries. If it touches an even number of times, the point is outside the polygon. If it touches an odd number of times, the point is inside.

To count the number of times the ray touches, you check intersections between the ray and all of the polygon sides.

share|improve this answer

Complete algorithm along with C code is available at http://alienryderflex.com/polygon/
Converting it to c# / winforms would be trivial.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly the scenario that wpf would have been infinitely handy: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms608753.aspx –  basarat Nov 22 '10 at 7:52

My answer is taken from here:Link

I took the C code and converted it to C# and made it work

static bool pnpoly(PointD[] poly, PointD pnt )
    {
        int i, j;
        int nvert = poly.Length;
        bool c = false;
        for (i = 0, j = nvert - 1; i < nvert; j = i++)
        {
            if (((poly[i].Y > pnt.Y) != (poly[j].Y > pnt.Y)) &&
             (pnt.X < (poly[j].X - poly[i].X) * (pnt.Y - poly[i].Y) / (poly[j].Y - poly[i].Y) + poly[i].X))
                c = !c; 
        }
        return c;
    }

You can test it with this example:

PointD[] pts = new PointD[] { new PointD { X = 1, Y = 1 }, 
                                    new PointD { X = 1, Y = 2 }, 
                                    new PointD { X = 2, Y = 2 }, 
                                    new PointD { X = 2, Y = 3 },
                                    new PointD { X = 3, Y = 3 },
                                    new PointD { X = 3, Y = 1 }};

        List<bool> lst = new List<bool>();
        lst.Add(pnpoly(pts, new PointD { X = 2, Y = 2 }));
        lst.Add(pnpoly(pts, new PointD { X = 2, Y = 1.9 }));
        lst.Add(pnpoly(pts, new PointD { X = 2.5, Y = 2.5 }));
        lst.Add(pnpoly(pts, new PointD { X = 1.5, Y = 2.5 }));
        lst.Add(pnpoly(pts, new PointD { X = 5, Y = 5 }));
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