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I have a list of Spam objects:

class Spam:
    def update(self):
        print('updating spam!')

some of them might be SpamLite objects:

class SpamLite(Spam):
    def update(self):
        print('this spam is lite!')
        Spam.update(self)

I would like to be able to take an arbitrary object from the list, and add something to it's update method, something like:

def poison(spam):
    tmp = spam.update 
    def newUpdate(self):
        print 'this spam has been poisoned!'
        tmp(self)
    spam.update = newUpdate

I want spam.update() to now either print:

this spam has been poisoned!
updating spam!

or

this spam has been poisoned!
this spam is lite!
updating spam!

depending on whether it was a SpamLite or just a Spam.

But that doesn't work, because spam.update() won't pass in the self argument automatically, and because if tmp leaves scope or changes then it won't call the old update. Is there a way I can do this?

share|improve this question
    
Polymorphism? Should be easy to implement, but i never wrote python. –  jwueller Nov 22 '10 at 8:36
3  
By the way, this is colloquially known as "monkey patching". –  detly Nov 22 '10 at 8:44
1  
It's considered good practice to use super instead of calling Spam.update. –  katrielalex Nov 22 '10 at 14:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
def poison(spam):
    tmp = spam.update
    def newUpdate():
        print 'this spam has been poisoned!'
        tmp()
    spam.update = newUpdate

Full Script:

class Spam:
    def update(self):
        print('updating spam!')

class SpamLite(Spam):
    def update(self):
        print('this spam is lite!')
        Spam.update(self)

def poison(spam):
    tmp = spam.update # it is a bound method that doesn't take any arguments
    def newUpdate():
        print 'this spam has been poisoned!'
        tmp()
    spam.update = newUpdate


from operator import methodcaller    
L = [Spam(), SpamLite()]
map(methodcaller('update'), L)
map(poison, L)
print "*"*79
map(methodcaller('update'), L)

Output:

updating spam!
this spam is lite!
updating spam!
*******************************************************************************
this spam has been poisoned!
updating spam!
this spam has been poisoned!
this spam is lite!
updating spam!
share|improve this answer
    
can this work if newUpdate() needs a self reference? –  themissinglint Nov 23 '10 at 11:21
    
@themissinglint: Yes. In this case self is called spam. You don't need to pass it explicitly; just use it inside newUpdate() whenever you need it. If you'd like to change update method for all instances of the Spam class (not just the selected few) then you could: Spam.update = types.UnboundMethodType(lambda self: ..do something with self.., None, Spam); see gist.github.com/712646 –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 23 '10 at 22:37

Another approach, with MethodType:

class Spam:
    def update(self):
        print('updating spam!')

class SpamLite(Spam):
    def update(self):
        print('this spam is lite!')
        Spam.update(self)

def poison(spam):
    import types
    tmp = spam.update 
    def newUpdate(self):
        print 'this spam has been poisoned!'
        tmp()
    newUpdate = types.MethodType(newUpdate, spam, Spam)
    spam.update = newUpdate

spam = Spam()
spam_lite = SpamLite()
poison(spam)
poison(spam_lite)
spam.update()
print
spam_lite.update()
share|improve this answer
    
+1 beat me to it. –  aaronasterling Nov 22 '10 at 8:48

MonkeyPatching is frowned upon, in the python world.

You should really use the Mixin approach and use Multiple inheritance.

You can then dynamically replace (update) the parents to achieve the desired effect.

share|improve this answer
    
How does that allow one to change the method on a particular instance and not others? Are you talking about changing its __class__ attribute? –  aaronasterling Nov 22 '10 at 9:01

Use decorators like this:

def method_decorator(f):
    def wrapper(self, *args, **kwargs):
        print('this spam has been poisoned!')
        return f(self)
    return wrapper

class Spam:
    def update(self):
        print('updating spam!')

    @method_decorator
    def update2(self):
        print('updating spam!')

Spam().update()
Spam().update2()

This prints:

updating spam!
this spam has been poisoned!
updating spam!

If you want to know more about decorators read this: http://www.drdobbs.com/web-development/184406073

The above is not a "good citizen" decorator, read the article to know how to write one. Be sure to check also decorator library: http://pypi.python.org/pypi/decorator

HTH

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