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I have the following enumeration:

public enum AuthenticationMethod
{
    FORMS = 1,
    WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION = 2,
    SINGLESIGNON = 3
}

The problem however is that I need the word "FORMS" when I ask for AuthenticationMethod.FORMS and not the id 1.

I have found the following solution for this problem (link):

First I need to create a custom attribute called "StringValue":

public class StringValue : System.Attribute
{
    private string _value;

    public StringValue(string value)
    {
        _value = value;
    }

    public string Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
    }

}

Then I can add this attribute to my enumerator:

public enum AuthenticationMethod
{
    [StringValue("FORMS")]
    FORMS = 1,
    [StringValue("WINDOWS")]
    WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION = 2,
    [StringValue("SSO")]
    SINGLESIGNON = 3
}

And ofcourse I need something to retrieve that StringValue:

    public static class StringEnum
{
    public static string GetStringValue(Enum value)
    {
        string output = null;
        Type type = value.GetType();

        //Check first in our cached results...

        //Look for our 'StringValueAttribute' 

        //in the field's custom attributes

        FieldInfo fi = type.GetField(value.ToString());
        StringValue[] attrs =
           fi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(StringValue),
                                   false) as StringValue[];
        if (attrs.Length > 0)
        {
            output = attrs[0].Value;
        }

        return output;
    }
}

Good now I've got the tools to get a string value for an enumerator. I can then use it like this:

string valueOfAuthenticationMethod = StringEnum.GetStringValue(AuthenticationMethod.FORMS);

Okay now all of this works like charm but I find its a whole lot of work. I was wondering if there is a better solution for this.

I also tried something with a dictionary and static properties but that wasn't better either.

share|improve this question
6  
Nice! I can use this to translate enum values to localized strings. –  Øyvind Skaar Jan 8 '09 at 14:34
3  
While you may find this long winded, it's actually a pretty flexible way to go for other things. As one of my colleagues pointed out, this could be used in many cases to replace Enum Helpers that map database codes to enum values etc... –  BenAlabaster Jan 8 '09 at 16:15
1  
It is an "Enumeration", not an "Enumerator". –  Ed S. Jan 9 '09 at 2:27
11  
MSDN reccoments suffix attribute classes with "Attribute" suffix. So "class StringValueAttribute" ;) –  serhio Jun 30 '11 at 14:53
7  
I agree with @BenAlabaster this is actually quite flexible. Also, you could make this an extension method just by adding this in front of the Enum in your static method. Then you can do AuthenticationMethod.Forms.GetStringValue(); –  Justin Pihony May 10 '12 at 18:56

30 Answers 30

up vote 423 down vote accepted

Try type-safe-enum pattern.

public sealed class AuthenticationMethod {

    private readonly String name;
    private readonly int value;

    public static readonly AuthenticationMethod FORMS = new AuthenticationMethod (1, "FORMS");
    public static readonly AuthenticationMethod WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION = new AuthenticationMethod (2, "WINDOWS");
    public static readonly AuthenticationMethod SINGLESIGNON = new AuthenticationMethod (3, "SSN");        

    private AuthenticationMethod(int value, String name){
        this.name = name;
        this.value = value;
    }

    public override String ToString(){
        return name;
    }

}

Update Explicit (or implicit) type conversion can be done by

  • adding static field with mapping

    private static readonly Dictionary<string, AuthenticationMethod> instance = new Dictionary<string,AuthenticationMethod>();
    
  • filling this mapping in instance constructor

    instance[name] = this;
    
  • and adding user-defined type conversion operator

    public static explicit operator AuthenticationMethod(string str)
    {
        AuthenticationMethod result;
        if (instance.TryGetValue(str, out result))
            return result;
        else
            throw new InvalidCastException();
    }
    
share|improve this answer
6  
+1 works for any string, not just ones which fit the C# rules for namespacing –  annakata Feb 4 '09 at 14:34
8  
It looks like an enum but it isn't an enum. I can imagine that causing some interesting problems if people start trying to compare AuthenticationMethods. You probably need to overload various equality operators too. –  Ant Feb 25 '10 at 9:18
19  
@Ant: I don't have to. Since we have only one instance of each AuthenticationMethod the reference equality inherited from Object works fine. –  Jakub Šturc Feb 26 '10 at 9:24
7  
@tyriker: Compiler does. The constructor is private so you cannot create new instance. Also static members are not accessible through instance. –  Jakub Šturc Oct 14 '10 at 6:56
7  
@Jakub Very interesting. I had to play with it to figure out how to use it, and realize its benefits. It's a public, non-static class, but can't be instantiated and you can only access its static members. Basically, it behaves like an enum. But the best part...the static members are typed of the class and not a generic string or int. It's a ... [wait for it] ... type safe enum! Thanks for helping me understand. –  tyriker Oct 14 '10 at 17:56

Use method

Enum.GetName(Type MyEnumType,  object enumvariable)  

as in (Assume Shipper is a defined Enum)

Shipper x = Shipper.FederalExpress;
string s = Enum.GetName(typeof(Shipper), x);

There are a bunch of other static methods on the Enum class worth investigating too...

share|improve this answer
5  
Exactly. I did make a custom attribute for a string description, but that's because I want a user-friendly version (with spaces and other special characters) that can be easily bound to a ComboBox or such. –  lc. Jan 8 '09 at 14:21
4  
Enum.GetName reflects the field names in the enum - same as the .ToString(). If performance is an issue it can be a problem. I wouldn't worry about it unless you're converting loads of enums though. –  Keith Jan 8 '09 at 14:26
8  
Another option to consider, if you need an enum with extra functiuonality, is to "roll yr own" using a struct... you add static readonly named properties to represent the enum values that are initialized to constructors that generate individual instances of the struct... –  Charles Bretana Jan 8 '09 at 14:39
1  
then you can add whatever other struct members you wish, to implement whatever functionality you want this "enum" to have ... –  Charles Bretana Jan 8 '09 at 14:40
1  
The issue here is that GetName is not localizable. That isn't always a concern, but it is something to be aware of. –  Joel Coehoorn Jan 8 '09 at 14:49

You can reference the name rather than the value by using ToString()

Console.WriteLine("Auth method: {0}", AuthenticationMethod.Forms.ToString());

The documentation is here:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/16c1xs4z.aspx

...and if you name your enums in Pascal Case (as I do - such as ThisIsMyEnumValue = 1 etc.) then you could use a very simple regex to print the friendly form:

static string ToFriendlyCase(this string EnumString)
{
    return Regex.Replace(EnumString, "(?!^)([A-Z])", " $1");
}

which can easily be called from any string:

Console.WriteLine("ConvertMyCrazyPascalCaseSentenceToFriendlyCase".ToFriendlyCase());

Outputs:

Convert My Crazy Pascal Case Sentence To Friendly Case

That saves running all the way around the houses creating custom attributes and attaching them to your enums or using lookup tables to marry an enum value with a friendly string and best of all it's self managing and can be used on any Pascal Case string which is infinitely more reusable. Of course, it doesn't allow you to have a different friendly name than your enum which your solution does provide.

I do like your original solution though for more complex scenarios though. You could take your solution one step further and make your GetStringValue an extension method of your enum and then you wouldn't need to reference it like StringEnum.GetStringValue...

public static string GetStringValue(this AuthenticationMethod value)
{
  string output = null;
  Type type = value.GetType();
  FieldInfo fi = type.GetField(value.ToString());
  StringValue[] attrs = fi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(StringValue), false) as StringValue[];
  if (attrs.Length > 0)
    output = attrs[0].Value;
  return output;
}

You could then access it easily straight from your enum instance:

Console.WriteLine(AuthenticationMethod.SSO.GetStringValue());
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't help if the "friendly name" needs a space. Such as "Forms Authentication" –  Ray Booysen Jan 8 '09 at 14:26
3  
So make sure the enum is named with caps like FormsAuthentication and insert a space before any caps that aren't at the beginning. It's not rocket science to insert a space in a string... –  BenAlabaster Jan 8 '09 at 15:10
3  
The auto-spacing of Pascal Case names becomes problematic if they contain abbreviations that should be capitalised, XML or GPS for example. –  Richard Everett Jul 20 '12 at 13:47
1  
@RichardEv, there's no perfect regex for this but here is one that should work a little better with abbreviations. "(?!^)([^A-Z])([A-Z])", "$1 $2". So HereIsATEST becomes Here Is ATEST. –  sparebytes Aug 12 '13 at 23:51

Unfortunately reflection to get attributes on enums is quite slow:

See this question: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/17772

The .ToString() is quite slow on enums too.

You can write extension methods for enums though:

public static string GetName( this MyEnum input ) {
    switch ( input ) {
        case MyEnum.WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION:
            return "Windows";
        //and so on
    }
}

This isn't great, but will be quick and not require the reflection for attributes or field name.

share|improve this answer
13  
You can fetch the attribute values once and put them in a Dictionary<MyEnum,string> to keep the declarative aspect. –  Jon Skeet Jan 8 '09 at 14:38
    
Yeah that's what we ended up doing in an app with lots of enums when we found out that the reflection was the bottle-neck. –  Keith Jan 8 '09 at 16:04
    
Thanks Jon and Keith, I ended up using your Dictionary suggestion. Works great (and fast!). –  Helge Klein Nov 23 '10 at 22:22

I use an extension method:

public static class AttributesHelperExtension
    {
        public static string ToDescription(this Enum value)
        {
            var da = (DescriptionAttribute[])(value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString())).GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);
            return da.Length > 0 ? da[0].Description : value.ToString();
        }
}

Now decorate the enum with:

public enum AuthenticationMethod
{
    [Description("FORMS")]
    FORMS = 1,
    [Description("WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION")]
    WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION = 2,
    [Description("SINGLESIGNON ")]
    SINGLESIGNON = 3
}

When you call

AuthenticationMethod.FORMS.ToDescription() you will get "FORMS".

share|improve this answer
    
this is the shortest! –  nawfal Feb 27 '12 at 0:54
    
I had to add using System.ComponentModel; Also, this method only works if you want the String value to be the same as the Enum's name. OP wanted a different value. –  elcool Jan 23 '13 at 15:02
2  
@elcool: Just change the description text... –  John Baughman Mar 14 '13 at 21:46
2  
Don't you mean when you call AuthenticationMethod.FORMS.ToDescription()? –  nicodemus13 Feb 1 at 19:56

I use the Description attribute from the System.ComponentModel namespace. Simply decorate the enum and then use this code to retrieve it:

public static string GetDescription<T>(this object enumerationValue)
            where T : struct
        {
            Type type = enumerationValue.GetType();
            if (!type.IsEnum)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("EnumerationValue must be of Enum type", "enumerationValue");
            }

            //Tries to find a DescriptionAttribute for a potential friendly name
            //for the enum
            MemberInfo[] memberInfo = type.GetMember(enumerationValue.ToString());
            if (memberInfo != null && memberInfo.Length > 0)
            {
                object[] attrs = memberInfo[0].GetCustomAttributes(typeof(DescriptionAttribute), false);

                if (attrs != null && attrs.Length > 0)
                {
                    //Pull out the description value
                    return ((DescriptionAttribute)attrs[0]).Description;
                }
            }
            //If we have no description attribute, just return the ToString of the enum
            return enumerationValue.ToString();

        }

As an example:

public enum Cycle : int
{        
   [Description("Daily Cycle")]
   Daily = 1,
   Weekly,
   Monthly
}

This code nicely caters for enums where you don't need a "Friendly name" and will return just the .ToString() of the enum.

share|improve this answer

Just use the ToString() method

public enum any{Tomato=0,Melon,Watermelon}

To reference the string Tomato, just use

any.Tomato.ToString();
share|improve this answer
    
Wow. That was easy. I know the OP wanted to add custom string descriptions, but this is what I needed. I should have known to try this, in retrospect, but I went down the Enum.GetName route. –  Rafe Sep 23 '12 at 6:52
1  
Why is everyone else over-complicating this? –  Brent Apr 22 at 19:13
3  
@Brent Because most often you have the .ToString() value different than the user-friendly value you need. –  Novitchi S Apr 23 at 13:35

I use a combination of several of the suggestions above, combined with some caching. Now, I got the idea from some code that I found somewhere on the net, but I can neither remember where I got it or find it. So if anyone ever finds something that looks similar please comment with the attribution.

Anyway, the usage involves the type converters, so if you are binding to the UI it 'just works'. You can extended with Jakub's pattern for quick code lookup by initializing from the type converter into the static methods.

The base usage would look like this

[TypeConverter(typeof(CustomEnumTypeConverter(typeof(MyEnum))]
public enum MyEnum
{
  // The custom type converter will use the description attribute
  [Description("A custom description")]
  ValueWithCustomDescription,

  // This will be exposed exactly.
  Exact
}

The code for the custom enum type converter follows:

public class CustomEnumTypeConverter<T> : EnumConverter
    where T : struct
{
    private static readonly Dictionary<T,string> s_toString = 
      new Dictionary<T, string>();

    private static readonly Dictionary<string, T> s_toValue = 
      new Dictionary<string, T>();

    private static bool s_isInitialized;

    static CustomEnumTypeConverter()
    {
        System.Diagnostics.Debug.Assert(typeof(T).IsEnum,
          "The custom enum class must be used with an enum type.");
    }

    public CustomEnumTypeConverter() : base(typeof(T))
    {
        if (!s_isInitialized)
        {
            Initialize();
            s_isInitialized = true;
        }
    }

    protected void Initialize()
    {
        foreach (T item in Enum.GetValues(typeof(T)))
        {
            string description = GetDescription(item);
            s_toString[item] = description;
            s_toValue[description] = item;
        }
    }

    private static string GetDescription(T optionValue)
    {
        var optionDescription = optionValue.ToString();
        var optionInfo = typeof(T).GetField(optionDescription);
        if (Attribute.IsDefined(optionInfo, typeof(DescriptionAttribute)))
        {
            var attribute = 
              (DescriptionAttribute)Attribute.
                 GetCustomAttribute(optionInfo, typeof(DescriptionAttribute));
            return attribute.Description;
        }
        return optionDescription;
    }

    public override object ConvertTo(ITypeDescriptorContext context, 
       System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture, 
       object value, Type destinationType)
    {
        var optionValue = (T)value;

        if (destinationType == typeof(string) && 
            s_toString.ContainsKey(optionValue))
        {
            return s_toString[optionValue];
        }

        return base.ConvertTo(context, culture, value, destinationType);
    }

    public override object ConvertFrom(ITypeDescriptorContext context, 
       System.Globalization.CultureInfo culture, object value)
    {
        var stringValue = value as string;

        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(stringValue) && s_toValue.ContainsKey(stringValue))
        {
            return s_toValue[stringValue];
        }

        return base.ConvertFrom(context, culture, value);
    }
}

}

share|improve this answer

I agree with Keith, but I can't vote up (yet).

I use a static method and swith statement to return exactly what I want. In the database I store tinyint and my code only uses the actual enum, so the strings are for UI requirements. After numerous testing this resulted in the best performance and most control over the output.

public static string ToSimpleString(this enum)
{
     switch (enum)
     {
         case ComplexForms:
             return "ComplexForms";
             break;
     }
}

public static string ToFormattedString(this enum)
{
     switch (enum)
     {
         case ComplexForms:
             return "Complex Forms";
             break;
     }
}

However, by some accounts, this leads to a possible maintenance nightmare and some code smell. I try to keep an eye for enums that are long and a lot of enums, or those that change frequently. Otherwise, this has been a great solution for me.

share|improve this answer
    
That's kinda what I was suggesting ;-) –  Keith Jan 8 '09 at 16:27

I really like Jakub Šturc's answer but offer a slight variation. For my purposes I really don't need the int _value because I don't plan to use it like an int or with binary operators. I think if you want to use binary operations you're better off taking the performance hit and decorating a regular old enum with string attributes, as shown in the original question.

Edit: I ended up having to bring back the int _value and add equality plumbing because I was dealing in copies of these. So now this is just a slightly more polished version of Jakub Šturc's answer...

Edit 2: Added implicit conversion operators for int and string to StringEnum descendant. The switch statements aren't the most maintainable. If someone has a better suggestion for this please comment - I'm interested to know if there is a better way.

/// <summary>
/// An Enum-like object which carries the string flags used in InternetSecure payment forms.
/// </summary>
[Serializable]
public sealed class PaymentItemFlag : StringEnum
{ 
    private static readonly PaymentItemFlag _testSuccess = new PaymentItemFlag(1, "{TEST}");
    private static readonly PaymentItemFlag _testDecline = new PaymentItemFlag(2, "{TESTD}");
    private static readonly PaymentItemFlag _recurringBilling = new PaymentItemFlag(3, "{RB}");

    public static PaymentItemFlag TestSuccess { get { return _testSuccess; } }
    public static PaymentItemFlag TestDecline { get { return _testDecline; } }
    public static PaymentItemFlag RecurringBilling { get { return _recurringBilling; } }

    private PaymentItemFlag(int value, string name)
        : base(value, name)
    { }

    public static implicit operator PaymentItemFlag(string x)
    {
        switch (x)
        {
            case "{TEST}":
                return PaymentItemFlag.TestSuccess;
            case "{TESTD}":
                return PaymentItemFlag.TestDecline;
            case "{RB}":
                return PaymentItemFlag.RecurringBilling;
            default:
                return default(PaymentItemFlag);
        }
    }

    public static implicit operator PaymentItemFlag(int x)
    {
        switch (x)
        {
            case 1:
                return PaymentItemFlag.TestSuccess;
            case 2:
                return PaymentItemFlag.TestDecline;
            case 3:
                return PaymentItemFlag.RecurringBilling;
            default:
                return default(PaymentItemFlag);
        }
    }
}

/// <summary>
/// Base class for Enum-like strings
/// 
/// Includes equality plumbing in case you're dealing in copies of StringEnums.
/// </summary>
[Serializable]
public abstract class StringEnum : Object
{
    protected readonly string _name;
    protected readonly int _value;

    protected StringEnum(int value, string name)
    {
        _name = name;
        _value = value;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return _name;
    }

    public static implicit operator string(StringEnum x)
    {
        return x._name;
    }

    public static implicit operator int(StringEnum x)
    {
        return x._value;
    }

    public static bool operator ==(StringEnum x, StringEnum y)
    {
        if (((object)x == null) || ((object)y == null))
        {
            return false;
        }

        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(x, y))
        {
            return true;
        }

        return (x._value == y._value);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(StringEnum x, StringEnum y)
    {
        return !(x._value == y._value);
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        StringEnum p = obj as StringEnum;

        if ((object)p == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        return (_value == p._value);
    }

    public bool Equals(StringEnum flag)
    {
        return (_value == flag._value);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return _value.GetHashCode();
    }
}

Usage
If anyone is curious, with above classes you can do things like:

        PaymentItemFlag fas = "{asdf}";  // fas will be null

        PaymentItemFlag asd = "{TESTD}"; // asd will be PaymentItemFlag.TestDecline

        bool equal = (asd == PaymentItemFlag.TestSuccess); // equal will be false

        bool equal2 = (asd == PaymentItemFlag.TestDecline); // equal2 will be true

        HashSet<PaymentItemFlag> set = new HashSet<PaymentItemFlag>();

        set.Add("{asdf}");  // null
        set.Add(1);  // PaymentItemFlag.TestSuccess
        set.Add("{TESTD}"); // PaymentItemFlag.TestDecline
share|improve this answer

I really like Jakub Šturc's answer, but it's shortcoming is that you cannot use it with a switch-case statement. Here's a slightly modified version of his answer that can be used with a switch statement:

public sealed class AuthenticationMethod
{
    #region This code never needs to change.
    private readonly string _name;
    public readonly Values Value;

    private AuthenticationMethod(Values value, String name){
        this._name = name;
        this.Value = value;
    }

    public override String ToString(){
        return _name;
    }
    #endregion

    public enum Values
    {
        Forms = 1,
        Windows = 2,
        SSN = 3
    }

    public static readonly AuthenticationMethod FORMS = new AuthenticationMethod (Values.Forms, "FORMS");
    public static readonly AuthenticationMethod WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION = new AuthenticationMethod (Values.Windows, "WINDOWS");
    public static readonly AuthenticationMethod SINGLESIGNON = new AuthenticationMethod (Values.SSN, "SSN");
}

So you get all of the benefits of Jakub Šturc's answer, plus we can use it with a switch statement like so:

var authenticationMethodVariable = AuthenticationMethod.FORMS;  // Set the "enum" value we want to use.
var methodName = authenticationMethodVariable.ToString();       // Get the user-friendly "name" of the "enum" value.

// Perform logic based on which "enum" value was chosen.
switch (authenticationMethodVariable.Value)
{
    case authenticationMethodVariable.Values.Forms: // Do something
        break;
    case authenticationMethodVariable.Values.Windows: // Do something
        break;
    case authenticationMethodVariable.Values.SSN: // Do something
        break;      
}
share|improve this answer
    
A shorter solution would be to remove the enums {} and instead keep a static count of how many Enums you have constructed. This also gives the benefit that you don't have to add a new instance you make to the enum list. e.g. public static int nextAvailable { get; private set; } then in the constructor this.Value = nextAvailable++; –  kjhf Feb 5 at 21:42
    
Interesting idea @kjhf. My concern though would be that if somebody reorders the code, then the value assigned to the enum values might change as well. For example, this could result in the wrong enum value being retrieved when the enum value is saved to a file/database, the order of the "new AuthenticationMethod(...)" lines are changed (e.g. one is removed), and then running the app again and retrieving the enum value from the file/database; the enum value may not match the AuthenticationMethod that was originally saved. –  deadlydog Feb 5 at 21:50
    
Good point - though I hope in these particular cases people won't be relying on the enum's integer value (or reordering enum code.) -- and this value is purely used as a switch and possibly an alternative to .Equals() and .GetHashCode(). If concerned, you could always put a huge comment with "DO NOT REORDER" :p –  kjhf Feb 5 at 22:30
    
Can't you just overload the = operator to allow switch to work? I did this in VB and can now use it in select case statement. –  user1318499 Aug 19 at 10:38
    
@user1318499 No, C# has stricter rules around the switch statement than VB. You can't use class instances for the Case statement; you can only use constant primitives. –  deadlydog Aug 19 at 22:22

How I solved this as an extension method:

using System.ComponentModel;
public static string GetDescription(this Enum value)
{
    var descriptionAttribute = (DescriptionAttribute)value.GetType()
        .GetField(value.ToString())
        .GetCustomAttributes(false)
        .Where(a => a is DescriptionAttribute)
        .FirstOrDefault();

    return descriptionAttribute != null ? descriptionAttribute.Description : value.ToString();
}

Enum:

public enum OrderType
{
    None = 0,
    [Description("New Card")]
    NewCard = 1,
    [Description("Reload")]
    Refill = 2
}

Usage (where o.OrderType is a property with the same name as the enum):

o.OrderType.GetDescription()

Which gives me a string of "New Card" or "Reload" instead of the actual enum value NewCard and Refill.

share|improve this answer
    
For completeness you should include a copy of your DescriptionAttribute class. –  Bernie White Apr 21 '12 at 10:03
    
Bernie, DescriptionAttribute is in System.ComponentModel –  agentnega May 8 '12 at 16:00

When I'm confronted with this problem, there are a couple of questions that I try to find the answers to first:

  • Are the names of my enum values sufficiently friendly for the purpose, or do I need to provide friendlier ones?
  • Do I need to round-trip? That is, will I need to take text values and parse them into enum values?
  • Is this something I need to do for many enums in my project, or just one?
  • What kind of UI elements will I be presenting this information in - in particular, will I be binding to the UI, or using property sheets?
  • Does this need to be localizable?

The simplest way to do this is with Enum.GetValue (and support round-tripping using Enum.Parse). It's also often worth building a TypeConverter, as Steve Mitcham suggests, to support UI binding. (It's not necessary to build a TypeConverter when you're using property sheets, which is one of the nice things about property sheets. Though lord knows they have their own issues.)

In general, if the answers to the above questions suggest that's not going to work, my next step is to create and populate a static Dictionary<MyEnum, string>, or possibly a Dictionary<Type, Dictionary<int, string>>. I tend to skip the intermediate decorate-the-code-with-attributes step because what's usually coming down the pike next is the need to change the friendly values after deployment (often, but not always, because of localization).

share|improve this answer

I wanted to post this as a comment to the post quoted below but couldn't because I don't have enough rep - so please don't down-vote. The code contained an error and I wanted to point this out to individuals trying to use this solution:

[TypeConverter(typeof(CustomEnumTypeConverter(typeof(MyEnum))]
public enum MyEnum
{
  // The custom type converter will use the description attribute
  [Description("A custom description")]
  ValueWithCustomDescription,
  // This will be exposed exactly.
  Exact
}

should be

[TypeConverter(typeof(CustomEnumTypeConverter<MyEnum>))]
public enum MyEnum
{
  // The custom type converter will use the description attribute
  [Description("A custom description")]
  ValueWithCustomDescription,

  // This will be exposed exactly.
  Exact
}

Brillant!

share|improve this answer

If you think about the problem we're trying to solve, it's not an enum we need at all. We need an object that allows a certain number of values to be associated with eachother; in other words, to define a class.

Jakub Šturc's type-safe enum pattern is the best option I see here.

Look at it:

  • It has a private constructor so only the class itself can define the allowed values.
  • It is a sealed class so values can't be modifed through inheritence.
  • It is type-safe, allowing your methods to require only that type.
  • There is no reflection performance hit incurred by accessing the values.
  • And lastly, it can be modified to associate more than two fields together, for example a Name, Description, and a numeric Value.
share|improve this answer

As most of you, I really liked the selected answer by Jakub Šturc, but I also really hate to copy-paste code, and try to do it as little as I can.

So I decided I wanted an EnumBase class from which most of the functionality is inherited/built-in, leaving me to focus on the content instead of behavior.

The main problem with this approach is based on the fact that although Enum values are type-safe instances, the interaction is with the Static implementation of the Enum Class type. So with a little help of generics magic, I think I finally got the correct mix. Hope someone finds this as useful as I did.

I'll start with Jakub's example, but using inheritance and generics:

public sealed class AuthenticationMethod : EnumBase<AuthenticationMethod, int>
{
    public static readonly AuthenticationMethod FORMS =
        new AuthenticationMethod(1, "FORMS");
    public static readonly AuthenticationMethod WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION =
        new AuthenticationMethod(2, "WINDOWS");
    public static readonly AuthenticationMethod SINGLESIGNON =
        new AuthenticationMethod(3, "SSN");

    private AuthenticationMethod(int Value, String Name)
        : base( Value, Name ) { }
    public new static IEnumerable<AuthenticationMethod> All
    { get { return EnumBase<AuthenticationMethod, int>.All; } }
    public static explicit operator AuthenticationMethod(string str)
    { return Parse(str); }
}

And here is the base class:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq; // for the .AsEnumerable() method call

// E is the derived type-safe-enum class
// - this allows all static members to be truly unique to the specific
//   derived class
public class EnumBase<E, T> where E: EnumBase<E, T>
{
    #region Instance code
    public T Value { get; private set; }
    public string Name { get; private set; }

    protected EnumBase(T EnumValue, string Name)
    {
        Value = EnumValue;
        this.Name = Name;
        mapping.Add(Name, this);
    }

    public override string ToString() { return Name; }
    #endregion

    #region Static tools
    static private readonly Dictionary<string, EnumBase<E, T>> mapping;
    static EnumBase() { mapping = new Dictionary<string, EnumBase<E, T>>(); }
    protected static E Parse(string name)
    {
        EnumBase<E, T> result;
        if (mapping.TryGetValue(name, out result))
        {
            return (E)result;
        }

        throw new InvalidCastException();
    }
    // This is protected to force the child class to expose it's own static
    // method.
    // By recreating this static method at the derived class, static
    // initialization will be explicit, promising the mapping dictionary
    // will never be empty when this method is called.
    protected static IEnumerable<E> All
    { get { return mapping.Values.AsEnumerable().Cast<E>(); } }
    #endregion
}
share|improve this answer

Option 1:

public sealed class FormsAuth
{
     public override string ToString{return "Forms Authtentication";}
}
public sealed class WindowsAuth
{
     public override string ToString{return "Windows Authtentication";}
}

public sealed class SsoAuth
{
     public override string ToString{return "SSO";}
}

and then

object auth = new SsoAuth(); //or whatever

//...
//...
// blablabla

DoSomethingWithTheAuth(auth.ToString());

Option 2:

public enum AuthenticationMethod
{
        FORMS = 1,
        WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION = 2,
        SINGLESIGNON = 3
}

public class MyClass
{
    private Dictionary<AuthenticationMethod, String> map = new Dictionary<AuthenticationMethod, String>();
    public MyClass()
    {
         map.Add(AuthenticationMethod.FORMS,"Forms Authentication");
         map.Add(AuthenticationMethod.WINDOWSAUTHENTICATION ,"Windows Authentication");
         map.Add(AuthenticationMethod.SINGLESIGNON ,"SSo Authentication");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you've come here looking to implement a simple "Enumerator" but whose values are strings instead of ints, here is the simplest solution:

    public sealed class MetricValueList
    {
        public static readonly string Brand = "A4082457-D467-E111-98DC-0026B9010912";
        public static readonly string Name = "B5B5E167-D467-E111-98DC-0026B9010912";
    }

Implementation:

var someStringVariable = MetricValueList.Brand;
share|improve this answer
1  
It's probably better to make the variables consts instead of using static readonly. –  AndyGeek Apr 22 '13 at 17:35

based on the MSDN: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc138362.aspx

foreach (string str in Enum.GetNames(typeof(enumHeaderField)))
{
    Debug.WriteLine(str);
}

str will be the names of the fields

share|improve this answer
2  
this will give the name of the enum, you can also use ToString() for that, this is not what was asked. checkout msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.enum.getname.aspx for more info about your bubu –  Mickey Perlstein May 7 '12 at 14:52

My variant

public struct Colors
{
    private String current;

    private static string red = "#ff0000";
    private static string green = "#00ff00";
    private static string blue = "#0000ff";

    private static IList<String> possibleColors; 

    public static Colors Red { get { return (Colors) red; } }
    public static Colors Green { get { return (Colors) green; } }
    public static Colors Blue { get { return (Colors) blue; } }

    static Colors()
    {
        possibleColors = new List<string>() {red, green, blue};
    }

    public static explicit operator String(Colors value)
    {
        return value.current;
    }

    public static explicit operator Colors(String value)
    {
        if (!possibleColors.Contains(value))
        {
            throw new InvalidCastException();
        }

        Colors color = new Colors();
        color.current = value;
        return color;
    }

    public static bool operator ==(Colors left, Colors right)
    {
        return left.current == right.current;
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Colors left, Colors right)
    {
        return left.current != right.current;
    }

    public bool Equals(Colors other)
    {
        return Equals(other.current, current);
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(null, obj)) return false;
        if (obj.GetType() != typeof(Colors)) return false;
        return Equals((Colors)obj);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return (current != null ? current.GetHashCode() : 0);
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return current;
    }
}

Code looks a bit ugly, but usages of this struct are pretty presentative.

Colors color1 = Colors.Red;
Console.WriteLine(color1); // #ff0000

Colors color2 = (Colors) "#00ff00";
Console.WriteLine(color2); // #00ff00

// Colors color3 = "#0000ff"; // Compilation error
// String color4 = Colors.Red; // Compilation error

Colors color5 = (Colors)"#ff0000";
Console.WriteLine(color1 == color5); // True

Colors color6 = (Colors)"#00ff00";
Console.WriteLine(color1 == color6); // False

Also, I think, if a lot of such enums required, code generation (e.g. T4) might be used.

share|improve this answer

for me, the pragmatic approach is class inside class, sample:

public class MSEModel
{
    class WITS
    {
        public const string DATE = "5005";
        public const string TIME = "5006";
        public const string MD = "5008";
        public const string ROP = "5075";
        public const string WOB = "5073";
        public const string RPM = "7001";
... 
    }
share|improve this answer

Here is yet another way to accomplish the task of associating strings with enums:

struct DATABASE {
    public enum enums {NOTCONNECTED, CONNECTED, ERROR}
    static List<string> strings =
        new List<string>() {"Not Connected", "Connected", "Error"};

    public string GetString(DATABASE.enums value) {
        return strings[(int)value];
    }
}

This method is called like this:

public FormMain() {
    DATABASE dbEnum;

    string enumName = dbEnum.GetString(DATABASE.enums.NOTCONNECTED);
}

You can group related enums in their own struct. Since this method uses the enum type, you can use Intellisense to display the list of enums when making the GetString() call.

You can optionally use the new operator on the DATABASE struct. Not using it means the strings List is not allocated until the first GetString() call is made.

share|improve this answer

Use object Enum.Parse(System.Type enumType, string value, bool ignoreCase); got it from http://blogs.msdn.com/b/tims/archive/2004/04/02/106310.aspx

share|improve this answer
3  
You should revise this answer to include an example not just a link. –  Bernie White Apr 21 '12 at 10:04
    
and read the question, same answer as above msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.enum.getname.aspx –  Mickey Perlstein May 7 '12 at 14:53

The link http://blogs.msdn.com/b/tims/archive/2004/04/02/106310.aspx is only fetching the values from enum but the content written by Ratnesh is fetching the values of Enum in form of string from Resource file based on different cultures. That is good one.

share|improve this answer

My answer, working on @user29964 's answer (which is by far the simplest and closest to a Enum) is

 public class StringValue : System.Attribute
    {
        private string _value;

        public StringValue(string value)
        {
            _value = value;
        }

        public string Value
        {
            get { return _value; }
        }



        public static string GetStringValue(Enum Flagvalue)
        {
            Type type = Flagvalue.GetType();
            string[] flags = Flagvalue.ToString().Split(',').Select(x => x.Trim()).ToArray();
            List<string> values = new List<string>();

            for (int i = 0; i < flags.Length; i++)
            {

                FieldInfo fi = type.GetField(flags[i].ToString());

                StringValue[] attrs =
                   fi.GetCustomAttributes(typeof(StringValue),
                                           false) as StringValue[];
                if (attrs.Length > 0)
                {
                    values.Add(attrs[0].Value);
                }
            }
            return String.Join(",", values);

        }

usage

[Flags]
    public enum CompeteMetric
    {

        /// <summary>
        /// u
        /// </summary>
        [StringValue("u")]//Json mapping
        Basic_UniqueVisitors = 1 //Basic
             ,
        /// <summary>
        /// vi
        /// </summary>
        [StringValue("vi")]//json mapping
        Basic_Visits = 2// Basic
            ,
        /// <summary>
        /// rank
        /// </summary>
        [StringValue("rank")]//json mapping
        Basic_Rank = 4//Basic
 }

Example

        CompeteMetric metrics = CompeteMetric.Basic_Visits | CompeteMetric.Basic_Rank;
        string strmetrics = StringValue.GetStringValue(metrics);

this will return "vi,rank"

share|improve this answer

The approach i found for internationalization of Enums or getting text of Enums from respective Resource files is to create an attribute class by inheriting DescriptionAttribute class

public class EnumResourceAttribute : DescriptionAttribute
{

    public Type ResourceType { get; private set; }
    public string ResourceName { get; private set; }
    public int SortOrder { get; private set; }
    public EnumResourceAttribute(Type ResourceType,
                         string ResourceName,
                         int SortOrder)
    {

        this.ResourceType = ResourceType;
        this.ResourceName = ResourceName;
        this.SortOrder = SortOrder;
    }
}

Create another Static class that will provide extension methods for GetString and GetStrings.

public static class EnumHelper
{
    public static string GetString(this Enum value)
    {
        EnumResourceAttribute ea =
       (EnumResourceAttribute)value.GetType().GetField(value.ToString())
        .GetCustomAttributes(typeof(EnumResourceAttribute), false)
         .FirstOrDefault();
        if (ea != null)
        {
            PropertyInfo pi = ea.ResourceType
             .GetProperty(CommonConstants.ResourceManager);
            if (pi != null)
            {
                ResourceManager rm = (ResourceManager)pi
                .GetValue(null, null);
                return rm.GetString(ea.ResourceName);
            }

        }
        return string.Empty;
    }


    public static IList GetStrings(this Type enumType)
    {
        List<string> stringList = new List<string>();
        FieldInfo[] fiArray = enumType.GetFields();
        foreach (FieldInfo fi in fiArray)
        {
            EnumResourceAttribute ea =
                (EnumResourceAttribute)fi
                     .GetCustomAttributes(typeof(EnumResourceAttribute), false)
                     .FirstOrDefault();
            if (ea != null)
            {
                PropertyInfo pi = ea.ResourceType
                                    .GetProperty(CommonConstants.ResourceManager);
                if (pi != null)
                {
                    ResourceManager rm = (ResourceManager)pi
                                          .GetValue(null, null);
                    stringList.Add(rm.GetString(ea.ResourceName));
                }
            }
        }
        return stringList.ToList();
    }
}

And on the elements of your Enum you can write :

public enum Priority
{
     [EnumResourceAttribute(typeof(Resources.AdviceModule), Resources.ResourceNames.AdviceCreateAdviceExternaPriorityMemberHigh, 1)]
    High,
     [EnumResourceAttribute(typeof(Resources.AdviceModule), Resources.ResourceNames.AdviceCreateAdviceExternaPriorityMemberRoutine, 2)]
    Routine
}

Where Resources.ResourceNames.AdviceCreateAdviceExternaPriorityMemberHigh & Resources.ResourceNames.AdviceCreateAdviceExternaPriorityMemberRoutine are constants in the resource file or you can say the strings whose values can be available in different cultures.

If you are implementing your web application in MVC architecture then create a property

private IList result;
public IList Result
{
    get
    {
        result = typeof(Priority).GetStrings();
        return result;
    }
}

and in your .cshtml file you can just bind the enum to your dropdownlist like :

@Html.DropDownListFor(model => Model.vwClinicalInfo.Priority, new SelectList(Model.Result))

Thanks Ratnesh

share|improve this answer

Well, after reading all of the above I feel that the guys have over complicated the issue of transforming enumerators into strings. I liked the idea of having attributes over enumerated fields but i think that attributes are mainly used for Meta-data, but in your case i think that all you need is some sort of localization.

public enum Color 
{ Red = 1, Green = 2, Blue = 3}


public static EnumUtils 
{
   public static string GetEnumResourceString(object enumValue)
    {
        Type enumType = enumValue.GetType();
        string value = Enum.GetName(enumValue.GetType(), enumValue);
        string resourceKey = String.Format("{0}_{1}", enumType.Name, value);
        string result = Resources.Enums.ResourceManager.GetString(resourceKey);
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(result))
        {
            result = String.Format("{0}", value);
        }
        return result;
    }
}

Now if we try to call the above method we can call it this way

public void Foo()
{
  var col = Color.Red;
  Console.WriteLine (EnumUtils.GetEnumResourceString (col));
}

All you need to do is just create a resource file containing all the enumerator values and the corresponding strings

Resource Name          Resource Value
Color_Red              My String Color in Red
Color_Blue             Blueeey
Color_Green            Hulk Color

What is actually very nice about that is that it will be very helpful if you need your application to be localized, since all you need to do is just create another resource file with your new language! and Voe-la!

share|improve this answer

I'm with Harvey but don't use const. I can mix and match string, int, whatever.

public class xlsLayout
{
    public int xlHeaderRow = 1;
    public int xlFirstDataRow = 2;
    public int xlSkipLinesBetweenFiles = 1; //so 0 would mean don't skip
    public string xlFileColumn = "A";
    public string xlFieldColumn = "B";
    public string xlFreindlyNameColumn = "C";
    public string xlHelpTextColumn = "D";
}

Then later ...

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
        xlsLayout xlLayout = new xlsLayout();

            xl.SetCell(xlLayout.xlFileColumn, xlLayout.xlHeaderRow, "File Name");
            xl.SetCell(xlLayout.xlFieldColumn, xlLayout.xlHeaderRow, "Code field name");
            xl.SetCell(xlLayout.xlFreindlyNameColumn, xlLayout.xlHeaderRow, "Freindly name");
            xl.SetCell(xlLayout.xlHelpTextColumn, xlLayout.xlHeaderRow, "Inline Help Text");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I use Harvey's as well, but I do use the const access modifier because it is a compile time value and I can thus use them in switch statements. Using your code can work for certain situations, but you cannot use your values in a switch. –  Jeff Johnson Jun 17 at 13:59

https://github.com/HeadspringLabs/Enumeration

Does what you want in a nuget package.

share|improve this answer

I have written a library to handle Enum <-> String Value conversions (allowing mapping in both directions)

The library is called EnumStringValues and is available from nuget in VS (package page is here too: https://www.nuget.org/packages/EnumStringValues) SourceCode is on GitHub here: https://github.com/Brondahl/EnumStringValues

Thoughts and comments are welcome.

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